Music: David Chevan and Bassology to play jazz Thursday, Oct. 25

David Chevan is a rare individual in the music world. An active bassist and composer, he is involved in some of the most dynamic and musically exciting jazz projects in Southern Connecticut. In addition to his busy performance schedule, Chevan also holds a Ph.D. in jazz history and is a full-time professor of music at Southern Connecticut State University.

Chevan’s artistic career has continued to blossom. He leads two of his own ensembles, BASSOLOGY and THE AFRO-SEMITIC EXPERIENCE, performs in two critically acclaimed duos, and is a free-lance bassist in the New Haven area.

Chevan’s band, BASSOLOGY, performs his original compositions along with arrangements of classic jazz compositions and favorite pieces from a number of traditions. The band has been featured in a number of local New Haven venues and continues to perform at special events. The band has participated in a number of festivals including New Haven’s Art on theEdge Festival, the New Haven Streetfest and the New Haven Harborfest, Norwalk’s SoNo Arts Festival and a variety of children’s concerts, and has released two CDs.

BASSOLOGY will perform on Thurs., Nov. 1, at 8 PM.  The combo will be playing a mix of blues and standards with an emphasis on tunes that drummer Ron Bragg sings. Bragg, according to Chevan, sounds like a cross between Johnny Hartman and Lou Rawls. The band for the evening will consist of Ron Braggs on drums and vocals, Will Cleary on saxophone, Sam Parker on keyboards and Chevan on bass.

The cover for this show will be $5. The Best Video Coffee & Wine Bar will be open, serving specialty coffee drinks, snacks. wines and beers.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

Monday, Nov. 5, 7 PM. What Would You Do? Film Series: “Brigham City”

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7:30 PM. Wildlife Stories: Ann Prum

Thursday, Nov. 8, 8 PM.New Haven Indie Pop Legends: The Furors

Sunday, Nov. 11, 1—2 PM. A Program for Kids of All Ages: Work of Hayao Miyazaki

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 8 PM. Indie Psych/Pop: MT Bearington

Thursday, Nov. 15, 8 PM. Bluegrass: Milksop: Unsung

 

Video: Soulful sounds of the Mountain Movers in the Best Video Performance Space

The Mountain Movers played the Best Video Performance Space last Thursday, Oct. 18. Prolific songwriter Dan Greene—who also is a member of the highly regarded Butterflies of Love—sang, played guitar and occasional harmonica (as on the song below, “The Day Calls Out To You”). Filling out the sound were bass player Rick Omonte and guitarist Kryssi Battalene, who added haunting arpeggios drenched in reverb.

Thanks to Dave Kelsey of Golden Microphone Productions for videotaping the set and uploading this song to YouTube.

Hank’s Recommendations 10/23/12

TWO NEW TV SERIES & HALLOWEEN

MAD MEN SEASON FIVE — The mystery of Don Draper returns in still yet unexpected ways. This most acclaimed and, at Best Video, awaited series—a multi-Globe and Emmy winner of the last four years—came out last week. Nonpareill art direction and period detail along with compellingly ambitious characters recreate the Madison Avenue world of the 60s, limning issues of misogyny, sexism, anti-semitism, homophobia, the glass ceiling and consumer materialism that resonate today. The first two linked episodes serve as both a reprise of what went before and a pilot of what’s to come. It’s a model of sophisticated writing and structured story telling: a fulfillment of everything promised.

 

THE WALKING DEAD — This edge-of-the seat horror drama is my choice for this year’s Halloween fare. The flight-and-pursuit story of a sheriff and a small group of people trying navigate zombie apocalypse—staying ahead of the dead that relentlessly stalk them while seeking solace in the hope of a refuge that may (or may not) lie ahead—focuses equally on the survivalist conflicts and rivalries within the group. Full of surprises and suspense and, above all, characters you can relate to, this is a show that has single-handedly reanimated the over-populated zombie genre. I’m trying to get my wife to watch it by comparing it to Friday Night Lights. Good luck to that.

Halloween is once a year but horror lives forever: a good horror film survives the designated Day of the Dead, remaining eternal in reminding ourselves of our dark side and how titillating it is to temporarily burrow in. With that in mind, we’ve created a BEST HORROR FILMS SECTION near cult and horror—in tall shelving that will tower over you like Frankenstein’s monster. Here is a sampling of our recommended horror films (two to watch with your kids; the other just for you) that will be good for any time of the year.

THE CHANGELING — Here, along with the following title (both rated PG), is the answer to a parent’s perennial plea: for a film that is “scary but not gory.”  Both are ghost stories that are among the best of their kind.

George C. Scott, putting in the inevitable strong performance, plays a music composer who witnesses the death of his wife and young son in a freak truck accident. Months later, he has taken refuge in an old, isolated Victorian house: all he wants is to be alone where he can immerse himself in his work. Instead, what he comes up against (or perhaps it’s the other way around) is the ghost of a murdered boy who seeks to use Scott as the instrument of his own vengeance. Scott’s at first reluctant and then dogged determination to carry out the boy’s mission puts him through some scarifying paces and winds up enabling him to exorcise his own demons along the way.

Octogenarian Melvyn Douglas, as a devious old man whose money and social prominence hides the answer to an ancient puzzle, adds a gem of a performance to a long distinguished career. If your idea of a horror thriller is to be moved as well as scared, then allow this ghost-thriller, complete with supernatural manifestations, séances and nocturnal grave diggings, to manifest itself on your TV screen.

 

LADY IN WHITE — Here’s a superb New England ghost story that’s also a Hitchcockian mystery thriller, great for both older kids and adults.

Twelve-year old Frankie, still in costume from a class Halloween party, is lured back into school by two mischievous friends and locked in the cloakroom overnight. Being alone, however, is not going to be his biggest fright. A man in a black face mask breaks into the cloakroom looking for something, encounters Frankie, and tries to strangle him. In the twilight between life and death, Frankie sees the apparition of a little girl, who, he realizes, is a former victim of his own assailant. Following his survival, he uses that vision as a clue to try to uncover the identity of the murderer, who, it turns out, has left nine other victims in the town.

This film is cleverly suspenseful and scary, but not gory. There is one possibly shocking moment when someone is shot in a car, and a suggested molestation motif, but the story is as sensitively told as it is beautifully photographed. If you’ve survived the rigors of that well-crafted, hoary chestnut, A CHRISTMAS STORY, but are in the mood for something spooky and horrific instead of hilarious, then allow this spirited film about one boy’s singularly determined quest into your own family den.

THE HUNGER — Vampire films (THE TWILIGHT SAGA, THE VAMPIRE DIARIES, TRUE BLOOD) have been all the rage lately, targeted to the unrequited hormonal yearnings of teen girls. Here is a highly stylized cult film with an A cast whose leanings are decidedly more toward sexual fulfillment and whose target audience is clearly adult.

Catherine Deneuve is an ageless, wealthy vampire whose successive lovers all too quickly age and die. Current lover David Bowie (an intriguing actor, as in THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH and the Criterion edition of MERRY CHRISTMAS MR. LAWRENCE) is on the way out (the scenes of this boy-man’s rapid aging are fascinating) and Susan Sarandon, the head of a rejuvenation clinic to which Bowie has sought help, is on the way in. How she gets the “hunger” from Deneuve and how she fights it is what the story’s about. Directed by Tony Scott (TAKING OF PELHAM 1 2 3, DOMINO, MAN ON FIRE, CRIMSON TIDE, TRUE ROMANCE, DAYS OF THUNDER), the film plays like a slick fashion spread where the blood is real. The story offers a dream of a cast in a film that itself is like a dream, yet goes straight for the jugular.

Sun., Oct. 28, family Halloween program from 1—2 PM

Don’t be scared!! Monsters will be at the Best Video Performance Space on Sunday, Oct. 28, from 1—2 PM. Cartoon favorites and clips from famous monster films for kids of all ages. Costumes are optional.

A donation of $5 to support the program is encouraged.

Music: Rich Moran sings classics from the Great American Songbook Thurs., Oct. 25

In August, vocalists Rich Moran and Christine Gill presented “Oscar and Steve” featuring the music of Oscar Hammerstein and Stephen Sondheim in our performing space. It was the second of two musical revues they created especially for the Best Video and Coffee & Wine Bar. On Thursday, Oct. 25, Rich returns to give an intimate solo performance showcasing music from the “Great American Songbook.” Once again, he will be backed up by the husband and wife team of Jeff Webber on saxophone and Judy Webber on piano. Sit back, relax, and enjoy a selection from our array of wine, beer, coffee, and non-alcoholic beverages while you listen to Rich’s inventive take on iconic standards. Classic songs from tunesmiths such as Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Johnny Mercer, and Hoagy Carmichael will be showcased. In between numbers, Rich will provide insightful commentary on the origin and history of many of the songs including where some of them can be found amongst the movies in the Best Video catalog.

A Hamden resident, Rich has performed in the New Haven area for over twenty years. In addition to his concert work, he has played a number of leading roles in musicals produced throughout the state. He is also an occasional guest host on Will Duchon’s “The Night Cafe” program featuring music from the Great American Songbook on Friday nights at 10 PM on WMNR Fine Arts public radio.

Jeff and Judy Webber first met while each were playing popular music in the New Haven club and restaurant scene. Judy is one of the busiest music directors in the New Haven area theater community. She directed this past summer’s Whitney Players production of “Hairspray” and is currently working on Sacred Heart Academy’s production of “White Christmas” to be performed at the Shubert Theater in late November. Jeff often joins her on woodwinds in the orchesteral pit for her shows. Rich, Judy, Jeff have been playing together for several years. In addition to “Oscar and Steve” in late August, they have collaborated recently for all standards concerts at the Guilford Public Library and the Hearth at Gardenside in Branford.

The Best Video Coffee & Wine Bar will be open with a fine selection of delicious snacks and refreshments, including Willoughby’s coffee. The Best Video Coffee & Wine Bar is now also licensed to sell wine and beer. The cover charge for this sow is $5.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

Sunday, Oct. 28, 6 PM. A Program for Kids of All Ages: Family Halloween Film Screening

Thursday, Nov. 1, 8 PM. Jazz: David Chevan

Monday, Nov. 5, 7 PM. What Would You Do? Film Series: “Brigham City”

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7:30 PM. Wildlife Stories: Ann Prum

Thursday, Nov. 8, 8 PM.Indie Psych/Pop: MT Bearington

Music: Frank Critelli & Mark Mirando to play the Performance Space Wed., Oct. 24

Frank Critelli and Mark Mirando are solo performers, occasional songwriting partners, and drinking-buddies from the great state of Connecticut. On October 24, at Best Video, they will each perform a solo set of songs from their extensive catalogues of original music. Then, they’ll perform a duo set of a few of the songs they’ve written together. Expect to hear everything from ragged harmonica-accompanied folk songs to pristine piano pop. Stop down and have a beer.

The music will start at 7:30 PM.  The cover charge for this show is $5.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

Thursday, Oct. 25, 8 PM. Music of the Great American Songbook (Porter, Berlin, Gershwin, Mercer et al): Rich Moran, accompanied by Judy and Steve Webber

Sunday, Oct. 28, 6 PM. A Program for Kids of All Ages: Family Halloween Film Screening

Thursday, Nov. 1, 8 PM. Jazz: David Chevan

Monday, Nov. 5, 7 PM. What Would You Do? Film Series: “Brigham City”

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7:30 PM. Wildlife Stories: Ann Prum

Thursday, Nov. 8, 8 PM.Indie Psych/Pop: MT Bearington

New Releases 10/16/12

Top Hits
Moonrise Kingdom (drama/whimsy, Bruce Willis. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 84.  A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “Wes Anderson makes films about small worlds in which big things happen: love, heartbreak, calamities, death. In his latest, the wondrous storybook tale Moonrise Kingdom, a girl and a boy, both 12, run off to a remote inlet on an island where most of the adults seem disappointed and more than a little sad. The girl and the boy are very serious — about love, their plans, books, life itself — and often act older than their age. She wears bright blue eyeliner; he puffs on a corncob pipe. You wonder what their hurry is, given that here adulthood, with its quarrels, regrets and anguished pillow talk, can feel as dangerous as the storm that’s hurtling toward the island, ready to blow it all down.” Read more…)

That’s My Boy (comedy, Adam Sandler. Rotten Tomatoes: 21%. Metacritic: 31. From David DeWitt’s New York Times review: “That’s My Boy is a pretty wretched movie if you want to activate your brain cells, but its busily plotted second half approaches involving. It leads to a big payoff wedding, after all, and it has a large ensemble for support, including Leighton Meester, Will Forte, Vanilla Ice [as himself], a funny James Caan, a cameo by Susan Sarandon and plenty of game-for-the-shame adult players like Peggy Stewart, as a politely naughty grandmother.” Read more…)

Neil Young: Journeys (Jonathan Demme-directed music doc. Rotten Tomatoes: 92%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’ Times review: “Thunder rumbling up from the center of the earth with scraggly flashes of lightning amid fire and flood: that describes the sound of Neil Young’s amplified guitar in Jonathan Demme’s compelling new concert film, Neil Young Journeys. The roar from below evokes huge chunks of rock displaced in a continual blasting operation. Heard over this man-made earthquake, Mr. Young’s passionate cracked whine assumes an oracular power. As always in his singing and songwriting, time weighs heavily. The cantankerous old man and the lost little boy are one and the same.” Read more…)

 

The Beatles: Magical Mystery Tour (Beatles’ TV special remastered. Rotten Tomatoes: 58%.)

New Blu-Ray
Moonrise Kingdom
That’s My Boy

New Foreign
The Forgiveness of Blood (Albania, drama, Tristan Halilaj. Rotten Tomatoes: 85%. Metacritic: 73. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “The murder in The Forgiveness of Blood gives its somber world a touch of florid red, but not so deep as to stain the screen. The American director Joshua Marston, who shot the film in Albania, doesn’t show the knife doing its work but instead focuses on the attenuated violence that comes after, rippling out and expanding until it engulfs all the characters. The Albanian tradition of blood feuds partly inspired Mr. Marston to make this story, yet what gives it shape are the more familiar conventions of the classic art film, including narrative ambiguity, ellipses and silence.” Read more…)

Turn Me On, Dammit (Norway, comedy, Helene Bergsholm. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 70. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “Our first glimpse of Alma (Helene Bergsholm), the hormonal 15-year-old heroine of Turn Me On, Dammit, is from above, as she masturbates ecstatically on her living-room floor. In her ear, the chipper voice of a phone-sex worker eggs her on — Alma is one of his regulars at Wild Wet Dreams — while the family dog watches impassively. Establishing its affectionately deadpan tone from the get-go, Jannicke Systad Jacobsen’s low-key Norwegian comedy takes coming-of-age literally.” Read more…)

New American Back Catalog DVDs
The Slender Thread (1965, drama, Sidney Poitier. From A.H. Weiler’s 1965 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “The producers of The Slender Thread, the dark tale that unwound yesterday at the Victoria, Festival and Murray Hill Theaters, have spun an often awesome, compelling but occasionally banal soap opera study stemming from the chillingly final statistic, ‘every two minutes someone attempts suicide in the United States’ that hangs in Seattle’s Crisis Clinic. Despite the obvious attribute of exposing the clinic’s largely unheralded good works, the performances of the principals and the film’s naturalistic dialogue are more memorable than the story itself. The Slender Thread makes its dramatic statement long before it unwinds in denouement.” Read more…)

The Sterile Cuckoo (1969, drama/romance, Liza Minnelli. Rotten Tomatoes: 88%. From Vincent Canby’s 1969 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “Quite clearly, Pookie Adams is a marvelous role, full of tough-sweet humor, and Liza Minnelli, the daughter of Vincente Minnelli and the late Judy Garland, turns it into one of the most appealing performances of the season, a triumph limited only by the squashy movie that encases it.” Read more…)

New British
The Ice House (thriller, Daniel Craig)

New TV
Mad Men: Season 5

New Documentaries
Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present (art, Marina Abramovic. Rotten Tomatoes: 95%. Metacritic: 75. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “The Artist Is Present, the centerpiece of an identically named 2010 retrospective of work by the performance artist Marina Abramovic at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, was one of those rare events that breach the wall dividing the art world from popular culture. Over 90 days — from the beginning of March through the end of May — hundreds of thousands of people streamed through MoMA, lining up [sometimes after camping out on 53rd Street the night before] for the opportunity to see Ms. Abramovic face to face. She sat in a plain wooden chair, gazing straight ahead, silently, into the eyes of whichever museum patron happened to be seated across from her. The effect, as recorded by Matthew Akers in his documentary Marina Abramovic the Artist Is Present, was galvanic. Many spectators cried during their encounter with Ms. Abramovic, and tears could often be seen in her eyes as well.” Read more…)

2016: Obama’s America (right wing political doc, Dinesh D’Souza. Rotten Tomatoes: 28%. Metacritic: 40. From Andy Webster’s New York Times review: “Dinesh D’Souza — the author of the best seller The Roots of Obama’s Rage and a former American Enterprise Institute fellow — is not a fan of President Obama. The strident documentary 2016: Obama’s America  [co-directed with John Sullivan] builds on Mr. D’Souza’s 2010 cover article for Forbes, which asserts that Mr. Obama pursues his father’s left-leaning, ‘anticolonial’ ideals. Here they are presented as flaws consistent with the senior Obama’s multiple relationships, alcoholism and fatal auto accident in 1982.” Read more…)

New Music DVDs
Neil Young: Journeys (Jonathan Demme-directed music doc, in Top Hits. Rotten Tomatoes: 92%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’ Times review: “Thunder rumbling up from the center of the earth with scraggly flashes of lightning amid fire and flood: that describes the sound of Neil Young’s amplified guitar in Jonathan Demme’s compelling new concert film, Neil Young Journeys. The roar from below evokes huge chunks of rock displaced in a continual blasting operation. Heard over this man-made earthquake, Mr. Young’s passionate cracked whine assumes an oracular power. As always in his singing and songwriting, time weighs heavily. The cantankerous old man and the lost little boy are one and the same.” Read more…)

The Beatles: Magical Mystery Tour (Beatles’ TV special remastered, in Top Hits. Rotten Tomatoes: 58%.)

New Children’s DVDs
Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (Dreamworks animated feature. Rotten Tomatoes: 76%. Metacritic: 59.)
Scooby-Doo: 13 Spooky Tales

Hank’s Recommendations 10/16/12

MOONRISE KINGDOM — Following BOTTLE ROCKET, RUSHMORE and THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS, Wes Anderson’s live action films—LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU and DARJEELING LIMITED—seemed to me an attempt to replace what was totally original and winningly eccentric into with a “Wes Anderson” formula that was simply precious and coy.

Moonrise Kingdom, his latest, however, is a brilliant return to form.

Taking place on a New England island in 1965, the film opens with a stately albeit whimsical introduction to an oddball family and their home called Summer’s End. The parents, the Bishops, are two lawyers who are most compatible when citing law cases to each other. He (Bill Murray) is otherwise distracted while she (Frances McDormand) runs their rambunctious household with the help of a bullhorn while carrying on a clandestine flirtation with the island’s lonely self-effacing sheriff (Bruce Willis). Suzy, their twelve-year-old daughter, jaundiced about her family, including a trio of much younger male siblings, loses herself in fantasy novels she steals from the library and wishes she was an orphan. But she is part of a clandestine plot of her own.

For on the other side of the island is a Boy Scout camp strictly but lovingly run by Ed Norton, who finds not one of his uniformed charges up to standard—except for Sam who does everything Scout-wise right but is alienated from the rest of the troop. He actually is an orphan who loses himself in landscape painting and whose off-island foster family doesn’t really want him anymore.

A year ago the two momentarily, and wordlessly, met at a school pageant. A subsequent correspondence of letters espoused their mutual devotion and sealed their pact to escape the adult world together. And sure enough they do, galvanizing the entire island adult world—parents, scout leaders (along with their troops), neighbors, social services (Tilda Swinton) and the island’s sheriff—to rise to the madcap search and rescue. Of course these adults, so rooted in their ways, don’t realize they will be totally outpaced by Sam’s mastery of survival techniques and skills. All this just as an offshore storm approaches.

So much of the filmmaking, in its framing and with its judicious use of split-screen, slow motion, flashback asides, is witty; the art direction and cinematography scrumptuously eye-catching. The dialogue, with not a wasted word, is a touch surreal, yet realistic enough to evoke sympathy and even suspense.

When Bruce Willis’ sheriff acknowledges that twelve year old Sam is smarter than himself, he adds: “But even smart kids stick their finger in the electrical socket sometimes…It’s been proven by history, all mankind makes mistakes. It’s our job to try to protect you from making the dangerous ones if we can. [Handing him a beer] Want a slug.”

The Bishops lying in bed with the rain falling:

“I’m sorry Walt.”

“It’s not your fault. [Beat] Which injuries are you apologizing for, specifically?”

“Specifically? Whichever ones still hurt.”

“Half of these were self-inflicted.”

The dialogue of the two young escapees—neither coy nor precious nor littered with faux-kids-speak—are credibly appropriate to their ages yet somehow uttered with a wisdom beyond their years, its palimpsest of innocence leavened with the foreknowledge that innocence won’t be likely to survive childhood. About a deceased pet:

“Was he a good dog?”

“Who’s to say. But he didn’t deserve to die.”

In this wonderful eye-catching, ear pleasing film that is a fable, a satire, a parody of adult speech and manners, of escape films, war films, westerns, therapy dramas, pageants and religious miracle plays, not to mention HIGH SIERRA and KEY LARGO, there are plenty of surprises, which I could never spoil even if I wanted to. True art is original, and never duplicable.

Oh yes, and Harvey Keitel is in it.

 

Mountain Movers in the Performance Space on Thurs., Oct. 18

The Mountain Movers will play the Best Video Performance Space on Thurs., Oct. 18. The music starts promptly at 8 p.m.

The Mountain Movers were started by Daniel Greene and Rick Omonte to keep up with Dan’s prolific songwriting. The band is based out of New Haven, Connecticut where they have a wealth of talented friends to help them perform and record their songs. Their sound can best be described as dreamy rock.

Always heartfelt, Greene’s ability to paint a picture with words is uncanny. Sonically, the band has a love for warm old tones, echoes, and tape hiss. This is apparent in their discography as most of their output was made on 2 inch reel to reel machines or 8 track cassette recorders.

The Mountain Movers are also known for their distinct visual style and their various releases feature Dan’s unique artwork (pencil/pen drawings, pastels, and watercolor paintings).

Recently the decision was made to create the band’s own record label, Car Crash Avoiders, further cementing the reputation they hold for a very hands-on ethos. They have played shows with Dinosaur Jr., MV and EE, Josephine Foster, Akron Family, Mark Mulcahy, Wolf Parade, and Cherry Blossoms. They have had banner reviews from Shindig, OMG Vinyl, Terrascope UK, and many other fine spots. New recordings are always in the works.

The Mountain Movers recently released a new 7-inch vinyl 45, “Desertion” b/w “Summertime.”

The Best Video Coffee & Wine Bar will be open with a fine selection of delicious snacks and refreshments, including Willoughby’s coffee. Best Video is licensed to sell wine and beer. Suggested donation to support the music programming at Best Video is $5.

Listen: The Mountain Movers song “World What World”:

 

Alice Mattison & Sandi Kahn Shelton to read Wed., Oct. 17

Alice Mattison and Sandi Kahn Shelton (aka Maddie Dawson) will read from their fiction on Wednesday, October 17, at 7:30 PM.

Alice Mattison will read from her new novel, When We Argued All Night, about which The New York Times Book Review wrote, “Mattison always operates in both close-up and wide angle, and here the effect is often dazzling.”  See her website, AliceMattison.com.

Sandi Kahn Shelton will read from her work-in-progress, a novel called The Opposite of Maybe, which will come out next year from Crown Publishers. Sandi’s earlier books include the novel Kissing Games of the World and The Stuff That Never Happened (written as Maddie Dawson and published in 2010).  She writes feature stories for the New Haven Register. Her website is SandiShelton.com.

The Best Video Coffee & Wine Bar will be open with a fine selection of delicious snacks and refreshments, including Willoughby’s coffee. Best Video is also licensed to sell wine and beer.