Music: Elison Jackson live Thurs., Nov. 7, at 8 PM

Elison_Jackson_WebThe band Elison Jackson play the Best Video Performance Space on Thursday, Nov. 7. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

Elison Jackson is a stoner-soul/garage-folk band from New Haven, CT. They just released a new album, “Do Not Fear to Kill a Dead Man,” on Telegraph Recording Company out of New London.

Their previous EP, “I Do Believe She Flew Out the Drainpipe,” drew critical acclaim in regional press and blogosphere.  They’ve toured east of the Mississippi extensively for the past year and a half, and have shared the stage with Akron/Family, The Music Tapes, The Sadies, Those Darlins, and more.

Reviewing “I Do Believe She Flew Out the Drainpipe” on CT.com, Chip McCabe wrote, “Fans of Leonard Cohen, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Velvet Underground, The Byrds, Syd Barrett, and especially The Animals will rejoice over the authenticity and awesomeness of this album.”

Pre-release reviews of the new record are just as enthusiastic. The reviewer for the Symbiotic Reviews blog wrote:

In 2011, Elison Jackson released their sophomore LP “Spectral Evidence,” a rustic collection of folksy tunes that showcased singer/songwriter Sam Perduta’s gift for colorful storytelling while highlighting his bluesy, baritone drawl. Ambitious 2012 EP “I Do Believe She Fell Out of the Drainpipe” followed, a work overflowing with vintage organs, ethereal female choirs, trumpets, and sprawling song-lengths that served to further the idea that the New Haven, CT five-piece were more interested in atmospheric texture than simply belting out radio-friendly pop hits. Now with third full length “Do Not Fear To Kill A Dead Man,” Elison Jackson have perfected their blend of folk, blues, and baroque pop that’s at once intimately familiar and excitingly new.

When the group played the Best Video Performance Space this past June, they wowed the audience with their powerful songs and deft control of dynamics, able to shift effortlessly from an evocative whisper to a blistering roar.

View an artsy YouTube video for Elison Jackson’s song “2009” from their new LP “Do Not Fear to Kill a Dead Man”:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Oct. 30. LOCAL LEGENDS/NEW WAVE: THE FURORS

• Thursday, Oct. 31. HALLOWEEN DOUBLE FEATURE: “CARNIVAL OF SOULS” at 7 PM; “NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD” at 8:30 PM.  ***(Just announced!)***

• Monday, Nov. 4. FILM SCREENING: “IN THE BEDROOM”

• Wednesday, Nov. 6. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ESTHER GOLTON

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Thursday, Dec. 5. GARAGE ROCK/POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring BEST VIDEO’S OWN RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 11. WORLD MUSIC/FOLK: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Thursday, Dec. 12. JAZZ: DAVID CHEVAN

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

 

Rob Harmon’s recommendations 10/29/13

ROB HARMON’S RECOMMENDATIONS 10/29/13

Rob_Harmon_image_for_picksThe Horror! The Horror!

Personally, I enjoy watching horror movies any time of the year—occasionally binging on them like a kid on candy corn—but I understand that, around Halloween, they do go with the season. After all, what better way to celebrate the autumn and longer, chillier nights than to pop in a really scary movie and watch it with friends, family, or, gulp, do you dare it alone? Of course, there are many different kinds of horror films—serious, silly, scary, satirical, campy, slasher, haunted house, giallo, vampire, zombie, werewolf, witchcraft, American, British, Japanese, Italian, etc.—but, undaunted, I have attempted to gather together my 100 Favorite Horror Films into one list for your perusal and viewing enjoyment. Happy Halloween!

1. Dawn of the Dead (1978)
2. Psycho (1960)
3. Halloween (1978)
4. Night of the Living Dead (1968)
5. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
6. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) (the 1978 remake is surprisingly good, as well)
7. Rosemary’s Baby (1968)
8. The Birds (1963)
9. Videodrome (1983)
10. The Seventh Victim (1943)
11. The Thing from Another World (1951) (+ the 1982 remake!!!)
12. Sisters (1973)
13. Alien (1979)
14. Black Christmas (1974)
15. Dressed to Kill (1980)
16. Suspiria (1977)
17. The Evil Dead (1981)
18. Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
19. The Exorcist (1973)
20. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
21. I Walked with a Zombie (1943)
22. The Shining (1980)
23. Island of Lost Souls (1932)
24. Martin (1976)
25. Zombie (1979)
26. Evil Dead II (1987)
27. Daughters of Darkness (1971)
28. Deathdream (1972)
29. Don’t Look Now (1973)
30. God Told Me To (1976)
31. Dead of Night (1945)
32. The Wicker Man (1973)
33. Twitch of the Death Nerve (1971)
34. Blood Feast (1963)
35. The Black Cat (1934)
36. Friday the 13th (1980)
37. Carnival of Souls (1962)
38. The Uninvited (1944)
39. Black Sabbath (1963)
40. Onibaba (1964)
41. The Haunting (1963)
42. Curse of the Demon (1957)
43. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919)
44. The Omen (1976)
45. The Innocents (1961)
46. They Live (1988)
47. Frankenstein (1931)
48. The Brood (1979)
49. The Last House on the Left (1972)
50. Re-Animator (1985)
51. It’s Alive (1974)
52. Invaders from Mars (1953)
53. Near Dark (1987)
54. Nosferatu (1922)
55. House (1977)
56. The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
57. Dead Alive (1992)
58. The Mummy (1932)
59. Ringu (1998)
60. The Wolf Man (1941)
61. Carrie (1976)
62. Audition (1999)
63. The Hills Have Eyes (1977)
64. Black Sunday (1960)
65. Jigoku (1960)
66. Poltergeist (1982)
67. The Devil Rides Out (1968)
68. Dracula (1931)
69. Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
70. Basket Case (1982)
71. Phantasm (1979)
72. The Crazies (1973)
73. Scream of Fear (1961)
74. Pulse (2001)
75. Deep Red (1975)
76. Burn, Witch, Burn (1962)
77. The Stuff (1985)
78. Gremlins (1984)
79. Cat People (1942)
80. Lemora: A Child’s Tale of the Supernatural (1973)
81. Possession (1981)
82. Planet of the Vampires (1965)
83. The Invisible Man (1933)
84. An American Werewolf in London (1981)
85. The Masque of the Red Death (1964)
86. Strait-Jacket (1964)
87. The Eye (2002)
88. The Horror of Dracula (1958)
89. The Blob (1958)
90. The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)
91. At Midnight I’ll Take Your Soul (1964)
92. Ju-on (2002)
93. Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982)
94. Shock (1977)
95. Raw Meat (1973)
96. The Howling (1981)
97. Night of the Creeps (1986)
98. The Fog (1980)
99. Homicidal (1961)
100. Them! (1954)

New Releases 10/29/13

Top Hits
R.I.P.D. (comedy, Jeff Bridges. Rotten Tomatoes: 13%. Metacritic: 25. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “Committed genre fans endure enormous amounts of recycled garbage in hopes of seeing something, anything, new. Even the most forgiving have their limits, though, and this week’s multiplex terminus can be found in the noisy nonsense known as R.I.P.D. Based on Rest in Peace Department, a Dark Horse comic created by Peter M. Lenkov, the movie has the kind of clever-enough premise that could be easily pitched at a 60-second meeting: a heavenly police force hunts dead villains and sends them to hell. Written by Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, the movie was directed by Robert Schwentke, who made a promising thriller [Flightplan] a few years back.” Read more…)

Monsters University (animated Pixar feature, Billy Crystal [voice]. Rotten Tomatoes: 78%. Metacritic: 65. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “What are little boy monsters made of? In Pixar’s Monsters University, they aren’t made of slugs, snails and puppy dog tails — they’re monstrous versions of those ingredients, only cuter, fuzzier, brighter, wilder and woollier. A stomping, creeping menagerie, they embody a Popsicle-hued rainbow of seeming diversity, from their googly eyes to their hydra heads and sticky tentacles. In this passable prequel to Pixar’s magical 2001 film Monsters, Inc., anything and every being seems possible. Or so believes the young Mike Wazowski (voiced by Noah Johnson and Billy Crystal), who thinks that if he studies hard enough, he too can become one of his world’s Scarers.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
R.I.P.D.
Monsters University

Music: Esther Golton performs Wed., Nov. 6, at 8 PM; UPDATE: Show postponed

Esther_Golton_Best_Video_041713

UPDATE: This show has been postponed for health reasons.

Esther Golton returns to the Best Video Performance Space on Wednesday, Nov. 6. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

Philadelphia born, educated with a degree in flute performance, jazz and composition, Esther moved to Alaska in 1997 to live a simple life in a wilderness log cabin.  “Alaska is a place of extreme weather and fiercely independent people.  And it’s beautiful.  I think my songs and style have come to evoke that experience.”

Esther Golton creates music that satisfies the quest for something delightfully different and diverse.  Her voice has been described as  “silky smooth, precise and winsome.”  Add an unusually intricate use of the mountain dulcimer, stunningly fluid flute, and melodic, colorful writing, and you begin to turn heads.

Esther’s extraordinary life has included an Appalachian Trail Thru-hike (’91), 2 years in Tokyo teaching English and busking in the train stations (’92-’93), self-building a cabin while in Alaska (’98), and traversing the U.S. as a touring singer-songwriter (’07-present).  She was also an integral part of Whole Wheat Radio, an 8-year web-radio project (’02-’10) that encouraged discovery and support of independent music, and hosted top-notch touring acoustic musicians for live-webcast house concerts, as well as providing a community gathering space to the local townsfolk.

Esther’s newest work, “Stay Warm,” was released this year.   She previously produced 2 other projects:  a lyrically rich collection of songs titled “Unfinished Houses,” and “Aurora Borealis: Conversations with Alaska’s Northern Lights,” an album of exquisite flute-dulcimer instrumentals.  Says Carrie Newcomer: “The world so needs works of honesty and truth and worth like these.”

Listen to the title track from the new CD:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Monday, Oct. 28. FILM SCREENING: “CAPE FEAR” (Original version)

• Wednesday, Oct. 30. LOCAL LEGENDS/NEW WAVE: THE FURORS

• Monday, Nov. 4. FILM SCREENING: “IN THE BEDROOM”

• Wednesday, Nov. 6. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ESTHER GOLTON

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Thursday, Dec. 5. PSYCHEDELIC POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN from BEST VIDEO

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

 

 

Music: New Haven music legends The Furors play Wed., Oct. 30, at 8 PM

Furors_BEST_VIDEO_110812_72dpiNew Haven rock ‘n’ roll legends The Furors will perform on Wednesday, Oct. 30. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover charge is $5.

Comprised of guitarist Derek Holcomb and drummer Tom Dans—Holcomb sings lead and Dans harmonizes—The Furors have been playing together for over three decades. They have self-released numerous vinyl 45s, a vinyl LP and several compact discs. Their catalog is so beloved among local musicians that a tribute album, “Let’s Get Furious,” was released in 2003 featuring 38 Furors songs covered by 38 local musicians and groups.

The Furors’ music is joyful, quirky three-minute pop, like a cross between They Might Be Giants and early British Invasion rock ‘n’ roll.

View The Furors at the Best Video Performance Space in November, 2012, courtesy of Dave Kelsey from Golden Microphone Productions:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Monday, Oct. 28. FILM SCREENING: “CAPE FEAR” (Original version)

• Wednesday, Oct. 30. LOCAL LEGENDS/NEW WAVE: THE FURORS

• Monday, Nov. 4. FILM SCREENING: “IN THE BEDROOM”

• Wednesday, Nov. 6. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ESTHER GOLTON

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Thursday, Dec. 5. PSYCHEDELIC POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN from BEST VIDEO

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

 

“Revenge” film series continues with “Cape Fear” (1962) on Mon., Oct. 28, at 7 PM

In the tradition of “What Would You Do? Ethical Dilemmas in Great Films” and “Can We All Get Along? Culture Clash in Great Films,” Best Video and Temple Beth Sholom have been presenting “Revenge: Will the Cycle Be Unbroken,” a six-film series that began on Oct. 7. Members of Best Video’s staff share with owner Hank Paper and Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic of co-sponsors Temple Beth Sholom the duties of introducing the films and leading the post-screening discussions. All the screenings begin at 7 PM.

Reservations are highly recommended for these screenings; in previous series, most of the showings have been sold out or near capacity. Admission is $5 per film.

“Revenge: Will the Cycle be Unbroken” remaining schedule:

Mon., Oct. 28: “Cape Fear” (original, starring Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum; Rob Harmon presenting, 1962, USA) Max Cady (Robert Mitchum) is out of jail and out to get revenge on the attorney who helped secure his conviction on rape and assault charge eight years before. Gregory Peck plays Sam Bowden, the former prosecutor who desperately tries to protect his family from Cady’s escalating campaign of vengeful terror. In 1962, New York Times critic Bosley Crowther wrote, “A cold-blooded, calculated build-up of sadistic menace and shivering dread is accomplished with frightening adroitness in J. Lee Thompson’s melodrama “Cape Fear,” which clubbed its way into the Victoria and the Trans-Lux Eighty-fifth Street yesterday. And the word on it is: don’t take the children. If you want to be horrified, that’s your business. But don’t expose the youngsters to the ordeal of watching this film.”

Mon., Nov. 4: “In the Bedroom” (Rabbi Scolnic presenting, 2001, USA) Matt (Tom Wilkinson) and Ruth Fowler’s (Sissy Spacek) son Frank, shortly to leave for college, gets involved with an older woman who is separated from her husband and seeking a divorce. After the estranged husband kills Frank in a jealous rage, the Fowlers painfully wait for the legal system to bring justice. But if the legal system fails, what then?

Mon., Nov. 11: “The Searchers” (Hank Paper presenting, 1956, USA) Named by the American Film Institute as the greatest American Western film of all time, “The Searchers”—starring John Wayne and directed by John Ford—plumbs themes of obsession, revenge and racism. In a foreshadowing of the revisionist Westerns of the 1970’s, Wayne plays a character marked by deep moral ambiguity. Filmed amid the glorious landscape of Monument Valley, “The Searchers” is itself a monument to American myth-making.

All screenings start at 7 PM.

New: Halloween film screenings at Best Video Sat., Oct. 26, and Halloween night

Plan_9_DVDBest Video Performance Space presents a special pre-Halloween double feature of campy classic horror on Saturday, Oct. 26. The first movie is at 7 PM and the second at 8:30 PM. Free popcorn and $1.50 Pabst Blue Ribbons from the Best Video/Coffee Wine Bar. The $5 admission gets you into both movies.

Experience these cult classics on Best Video’s big 120″ projection screen.

7 PM: “PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE” (dir. Edward D. Wood, Jr., 1959) Grave-robbers from outer space! See the film widely hailed as the “Worst Movie Ever Made!” Starring: Gregory Walcott, Mona McKinnon, Tor Johnson, Vampira, The Amazing Criswell and Bela Lugosi!

8:30 PM: “TROLL 2” (dir. Claudio Fragasso, 1990) Trolls are loose… no, wait, make that goblins are loose in the sleepy little town of Nilbog! Unfortunately for young Joshua Waits his family has just arrived there for a vacation: will they survive? Luckily, however, the ghost of dear, old grand-dad swings by to help… A perennial frontrunner in the “Worst Movie Ever Made” sweepstakes! Must be seen to be believed! Starring: Michael Stephenson, Margo Prey

Night_of_the_Living_Dead_DVDCan’t get enough Halloween movie madness? Best Video Performance Space presents a special Halloween double feature of classic horror on Halloween night, Thursday, Oct. 31. Free popcorn and $1.50 Pabst Blue Ribbons from the Best Video/Coffee Wine Bar. the $5 admission gets you into both movies.

7 PM: “CARNIVAL OF SOULS” (dir. Herk Harvey, 1962). Mary Henry miraculously survives a horrific car-wreck but when she takes a job as church organist in another town she keeps seeing strange visions… or could they be actual manifestations of the living dead?! A creepy, low-budget chiller! Starring: Candace Hilligoss, Frances Feist, Sidney Berger

8:30 PM: “NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD” (dir. George A. Romero, 1968) A number of strangers hole up one evening in an abandoned farmhouse as the countryside is overrun by wave after wave of flesh-eating zombies! The original experience in white-knuckled terror! Starring: Duane Jones and Judith O’Dea

Rob Harmon’s recommendations 10/22/13

ROB HARMON’S RECOMMENDATIONS 10/22/13

Rob_Harmon_image_for_picksI MARRIED A WITCH (dir. René Clair, 1942) — World War II-era movie audiences, perhaps weary from the life-or-death struggles swirling around them, seemed to embrace fantasy with fervor: take stories of the afterlife or angelic happenings like HERE COMES MR. JORDAN, HEAVEN CAN WAIT, BETWEEN TWO WORLDS, and THE HORN BLOWS AT MIDNIGHT as proof of the popularity of escape. Furthermore, few comedic fantasies, then or since, can approach the sheer, delicious gauziness of French émigré director René Clair’s I Married a Witch (its title a winking play on the 1938 Rodgers and Hart musical “I Married an Angel”), released in 1942 towards beginning of the war but at about the height of the popularity of its bombshell star, Veronica Lake.

The story begins in 17th century Salem where a witch about to be burned at the stake casts a spell on her Puritan accuser (a blond-wigged Fredric March!) that he and his descendants will be forever unlucky in love. A tree is then planted over the site of the fire in order to trap the spirits of the witch, Jennifer, and her devilish father Daniel—also burned—in its roots. A quick montage follows the hapless and hen-pecked Wooleys (all played by March) through the years up to the present, when a lightning bolt cuts through a tree limb and at last releases the two witches into the world, initially in the form of vapor-like essences with dissipated voices.

Recognizing the latest in the cursed line Wallace Wooley (March, once again), a weak-willed politician about to be married to his shrewish fiancée (Susan Hayward)—the daughter of the local newspaper magnate—as a publicity stunt on the eve of the upcoming election for governor, they decide to take physical form in order to better wreak havoc: Daniel as the roly-poly, velvet-voiced Cecil Kellaway and Jennifer as Veronica Lake, she of the peekaboo blond tresses! However, an errantly-applied love potion soon throws a wrench into their plans as Jennifer accidentally forces herself to fall in love with Wallace, ensuring that the traditionally goofy complications of “meeting-cute” screwball-style are compounded: this is one witch who will not be denied!

I Married a Witch is as delicate and effervescent a romantic comedy as there is. Fredric March was as reliable a leading man as Hollywood ever produced; Kellaway is fiendishly entertaining; Robert Benchley provides reliable comedic support as Dr. Dudley White, Wallace’s best friend; and Veronica Lake is an ideal screwball heroine: strong-headed, a little dizzy, sexy, and, yes, totally bewitching. If you ever wondered what Lake was like at the height of her powers this movie will give you a good idea. Edith Head’s gowns are gorgeous and the rest of the production is solid, ably crafting a totally fantastic and studio-constructed – as only Hollywood (Paramount, in this case) could do it – storybook version of New England.

Director Clair (who has his own section at Best Video) was a famed early innovator in sound and surreal comedy in his native France, heavily influencing Chaplin among others. His deft touch is evident everywhere in these fast-paced, zippy proceedings, which successfully manage to intermingle the paranormal and politics, the battle of the sexes and American history, love and witchcraft. If you are in the mood for a Halloween film which is fun (and does not feature chainsaws, machetes, or body counts) then look no further than this delightful comedic bonbon.

New Releases 10/22/13

Top Hits
The Conjuring (horror, Vera Farmiga. Rotten Tomatoes: 87%. Metacritic: 68. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “The dread gathers and surges while the blood scarcely trickles in The Conjuring, a fantastically effective haunted-house movie. Set largely in 1971, it purports to tell a story based on ‘true case files’ about a family of seven whose pastoral dream became a nightmare soon after they moved into a Rhode Island farmhouse. One day, Mom, Dad and the girls are settling into their conveniently sprawling, creaking, squeaking two-story house — the rooms quickly become a disorienting maze — and the next, they’re playing hide and creep with a mysterious, increasingly malevolent force.” Read more…)

The Internship (comedy, Owen Wilson. Rotten Tomatoes: 35%. Metacritic: 42. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “Whatever Mr. Vaughn’s motivations, with The Internship he has charted possibly new, definitely uneasy terrain by helping create a big-studio release that, from start to gaga finish, is a hosanna to a single company, its products, philosophy and implicit politics. Plenty of movies sell stuff from fashion to wars and religion; this one sells the Tao of Google.” Read more…)

Before Midnight (romance, Julie Delpy. Rotten Tomatoes: 98%. Metacritic: 94. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “Where did the time go? Has it really been nine years since we last saw Celine and Jesse, in Paris, rekindling the romance that first sparked nine years before that, in Vienna? Luckily [for us and for them] they are still together, having hatched a pair of sweet blond twin girls and glided, or maybe stumbled, into their 40s. And, of course, because they are played by Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke, Celine and Jesse are still better looking than most of the rest of us, and still have quite a lot to say about themselves, each other and the world.” Read more…)

The Way Way Back (comedy, Steve Carell. Rotten Tomatoes: 85%. Metacritic: 67. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Though it takes place in what looks like the present — the familiar now of ear buds and smartphones — The Way, Way Back, a summertime coming-of-age tale written and directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, is infused with nostalgia. The movie’s title seems to refer to the rear-facing third seat of the massive old station wagon where we first encounter its hero, a glum 14-year-old boy named Duncan [Liam James]. But it also describes a hazy, bittersweet mood of recollection that hovers around the action like July humidity.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
The Internship
The Conjuring
Before Midnight

New Foreign
The Wall (Germany/Austria, drama/adventure, Martina Gedeck. Rotten Tomatoes: 72%. Metacritic: 67. From Neil Genzlinger’s New York Times review: “In a few weeks CBS rolls out a mini-series called Under the Dome based on a Stephen King novel. It’s about a Maine town cut off from the world when a clear dome materializes over it. The story focuses on the power struggles among those caught inside, but there is another direction you can take the same premise: the one of The Wall. In this absorbing German-Austrian film, a transparent barrier also imposes itself, but the woman it traps is, by all appearances, alone. Martina Gedeck plays that unnamed character in what is essentially a one-woman study of physical and mental survival.” Read more…)

New Docs
The Waiting Room (health industry, hospitals. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 84. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “The crowded emergency room of Highland Hospital in Oakland, Calif., is the setting of Peter Nicks’s wrenching documentary The Waiting Room. Shot in 2010 over five months, the film, which has no narrator, titles, statistical analysis or overt editorializing, observes a composite day there during which nearly 250 patients — most of them uninsured — pour in.” Read more…)

Room 237 (film history and interpretation, Kubrick’s “The Shining”. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%. Metacritic: 80. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Mamohla Dargis’ Times review: “An ode to movie love at its most deliriously unfettered, Room 237 is a nonfiction look at some very serious film fans who take The Shining, Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 masterpiece, very, very seriously. They know — deep in their obsessive, sometimes demented cinephile hearts — that Kubrick did more than make a feverishly entertaining film about a family falling apart in an isolated hotel called the Overlook. He also embedded amazing messages in The Shining, cunningly weaving secrets and signs into the film’s very fabric, leaving clues about the Holocaust in elevators and messages about the Apollo 11 Moon landing in a sweater. In books, blogs and now this movie these fans carry forth the godhead’s gnostic communiqués.” Read more…)

Music: Indie folk rock from Dave Brooks and The Streams on Thurs., Oct. 24

Streams_Cafe_Nine_WebThe Streams play the Best Video Performance Space on Thurs., Oct. 24. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

The Streams are a four piece rock group formed in 1991. They recorded an album of driving rock called, “Today, I Died,” which sat on the shelf for a decade and a half before finally seeing release two years ago. It is available now at thestreams.net, itunes.com and most other online music sites.

The group is headed by Dave Brooks with his band of grizzled New Haven music scene veterans including: Dean Falcone (Shellye Valauskas Experience), Jeff Wiederschall (Miracle Legion) and New Haven guitar dazzler, Bill Beckett.

The songs on “Today, I Died” derive inspiration from the pages of Shelby Foote’s history of the Civil War, which gave a detailed and personalized view of the times devoid of political fence hopping, and the Ken Burns visual history of the Civil War, which also brought a unique and human perspective. Recorded simply and with not a lot of studio affectation to eight- and sixteen-track tape in the l1990’s, the record still sounds vibrant and contemporary in the 21st century notwithstanding its 19th century subject matter. The songs are chiming, heartfelt, rocking. One hears the sweat, the fear, the courage.

The instrumentation is grounded by a solid rhythm section with some folky flourishes of mandolin, banjo and organ generally accompanied by raging electric guitars. The songs are tightly crafted pop rockers and lyrically run the gamut from blisteringly pompous war cries to quiet acoustic meditations on loss and heartbreaking destruction.

While songs from “Today, I Died” are centered lyrically around the American Civil War, Brooks’ current tunes are more personally oriented. But they share with his older songs a strong individual musical vision.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Oct. 16. ACOUSTIC ROCK: JAMES VELVET & THE LONESOME SPARROWS

• Thursday, Oct. 17. INDIE ROCK: ZOO FRONT

• Monday, Oct. 21. FILM SCREENING: “FURY”

• Wednesday, Oct. 23. CLASSICAL: RAVENNA MICHALSEN & ALEXANDER SMITH

• Thursday, Oct. 24. INDIE ROCK: THE STREAMS

• Monday, Oct. 28. FILM SCREENING: “CAPE FEAR” (Original version)

• Wednesday, Oct. 30. LOCAL LEGENDS/NEW WAVE: THE FURORS

• Monday, Nov. 4. FILM SCREENING: “IN THE BEDROOM”

• Wednesday, Nov. 6. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ESTHER GOLTON

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Thursday, Dec. 5. PSYCHEDELIC POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN from BEST VIDEO

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU