Music: The Wyrd Brothers, Jack Rollins play Best Video Thurs., Mar. 30

The Wyrd Brothers and Jack Rollins will each play a set of music on Thursday, Mar. 30. The show starts at 8 PM and there is a $5 cover.

The Wyrd Brothers.

Brian & Peter Wyrd played in various bands together starting out in 1967 as a Byrds cover band in Jr High school. They spent their youth playing music in the family barn or down in the basement breathing in concrete dust. After 30 years Brian received an email from Peter with the first round of lyrics to “Racing to the Bottom.” Brian sent back a guitar part and the idea of a reunion was born.

Jack Rollins.

Jack Rollins is a Cambridge, MA-based singer-songwriter in the mold of a young Bob Dylan. Among his influences are “The Almighty Mr. Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, Joan Baez, Pete Seeger, Memphis Slim, Mississippi John Hurts, Jack Elliot, The Band, Gillian Welch & Dave Rawlings, Patti Smith, Little Richard, Roy Orbison, Mr. Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Cylde Telon, Tom Rush.”

UPCOMING EVENTS:

• Friday, Mar. 24. SOLO GUITAR: GLENN ROTH; SINGER-SONGWRITER: BELLE OF THE FALL

• Saturday, Mar. 25. JAZZ: : THE FAKE MUSIC ENSEMBLE PLAYS “BLACK, BROWN AND BEIGE; YELLOW, TRANS AND QUEER: MY COUNTRY ‘TIS OF THIS (A PROTEST SUITE COMPOSED BY ALLEN LOWE)

• Sunday, Mar. 26. GEN X FILM SERIES SCREENING: “REPO MAN”

• Wednesday, Mar. 29. SINGER-SONGWRITER: LAMONT

• Thursday, Mar. 30. ALTERNATIVE/AMERICANA: THE WYRD BROTHERS; SINGER-SONGWRITER: JACK ROLLINS

• Friday, Mar. 31. ACOUSTIC ROCK: EDNA; SINGER-SONGWRITER: JACK ROLLINS

• Saturday, Apr. 1. CULT FILM SCREENING: TBA

• Sunday, Apr. 2. GEN X FILM SERIES SCREENING: “PHILADELPHIA”

• Thursday, Apr. 6. AVANT-GARDE: ELM FICTION

• Friday, Apr. 7. ROCK: GHOST RADIO, SONIA & SID

• Saturday, Apr. 8. CLASSICAL GUITAR: MAX LYMAN; AMERICAN PRIMITIVE GUITAR: ALEXANDER

• Sunday, Apr. 9. REDSCROLL RECORDS SCREENING AND MUSIC

• Thursday, Apr. 13. JAZZ: JEFF FULLER & FRIENDS

• Friday, Apr. 14. JAZZ: JOVAN ALEXANDRE

• Sunday, Apr. 16. GEN X FILM SERIES SCREENING: “BLUE VELVET”

• Wednesday, Apr. 19. FOLK ROCK: WE HAPPY FEW

• Friday, Apr. 21. ROCK ‘N” ROLL: DUST HAT

• Saturday, Apr. 22. JAZZ: ALLEN LOWE & THE FAKE MUSIC ENSEMBLE

• Sunday, Apr. 23. GEN X FILM SERIES SCREENING: “DO THE RIGHT THING”

• Friday, Apr. 28. BLUEGRASS: THE SLOCAN RAMBLERS (A GUITARTOWNCT CONCERT)

• Sunday, Apr. 30. GEN X FILM SERIES SCREENING: “THELMA AND LOUISE”

• Thursday, May 4. INDIE ROCK: PROCEDURE CLUB

• Friday, May 5. SINGER-SONGWRITERS IN  THE ROUND: JENNIFER DAUPHINAIS, CHRISTOPHER BOUSQUET, FRANK CRITELLI

• Saturday, May 6. CULT FILM SCREENING: TBA

• Sunday, May 7. GEN X FILM SERIES SCREENING: “MY BEAUTIFUL LAUNDERETTE”

• Thursday, May 11. INDIE ROCK: ZOO FRONT

• Friday, May 12. SINGER-SONGWRITER: SHAWN TAYLOR & WANDERING ROOTS (CD Release)

• Saturday, May 13. JAZZ: ALLEN LOWE & THE FAKE MUSIC ENSEMBLE

• Friday, May 19. INDIE ROCK: LA TUNDA

• Friday, June 2. JAZZ VOCAL: LINDA SATIN & JOE CARTER DUO

• Friday, June 16. BLUEGRASS: MILE TWELVE (GUITARTOWNCT PRODUCTIONS)

• Friday, June 23. CHAMBER ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Friday, Aug. 4. BLUEGRASS: HONEY DEWDROPS (GUITARTOWNCT PRODUCTIONS)

• Friday, Sept. 15. BLUEGRASS: ROB ICKES & TREY HENSLEY (GUITARTOWNCT PRODUCTIONS)

• Thursday, Nov. 16. BLUEGRASS: TIM O’BRIEN

New releases 3/7/17

Top Hits
Jackie (bio-pic focusing on White House years, Natalie Portman. Rotten Tomatoes 89%. Metacritic: 81. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “‘Jackie’ doesn’t try to complete that impossible, apparently unfinishable movie, the never-ending epic known as ‘The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy and What It Means to History.’ Instead, set largely after his death, it explores the intersection of the private and the public while ruminating on the transformation of the past into myth. It also pulls off a nice representational coup because it proves that the problem known as the Movie Wife — you know her, the little lady hovering at the edge of both the frame and story — can be solved with thought and good filmmaking. And as in Warhol’s Jackie portraits, John F. Kennedy is somewhat of a bit player here.” Read more…)

I Am Michael (true-life drama, James Franco. Rotten Tomatoes 66%. Metacritic: 56. From Jeannette Catsoylis’  New York Times review: “After watching ‘I Am Michael,’ Justin Kelly’s dreary gay-conversion biopic, I felt rather sorry for James Franco. As Michael Glatze, a gay-rights agitator who struggled to become a straight Christian pastor, Mr. Franco broods and puzzles and vacillates. But he often seems abandoned by a director whose approach is so noncommittal and dramatically limp that it strands the actor, and his character, in a bland purgatory of conflicting motivations. While intellectually laudable, Mr. Kelly’s determined objectivity is so distancing that it takes an inherently intriguing story [based on a 2011 article in The New York Times Magazine] and sucks the life out of it.” Read more…)

The Eyes of My Mother (horror, Diana Agostini. Rotten Tomatoes 76%. Metacritic: 64. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ Times review: “From the very first shot, Nicolas Pesce’s ‘The Eyes of My Mother’ unsettles as a broken woman staggers along a deserted country road before collapsing in front of an oncoming truck. It will be a long time before we learn who she is or what has happened to her; meantime, there are more than enough horrors to keep us occupied.” Read more…)

Always Shine (feminist thriller, Mackenzie Davis. Rotten Tomatoes 91%. Metacritic: 72. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “On the surface, ‘Always Shine’ is a tense thriller about failed female alliances — much of the time it seems poised to become a remake of ‘Persona,’ as made by the horror director Alexandre Aja. But it’s not that, or rather, it’s not just that. Directed by Sophia Takal from a script by Lawrence Michael Levine [Ms. Takal appeared in Mr. Levine’s 2014 comedy, ‘Wild Canaries’], ‘Always Shine’ is a deft, assured movie with a sly self-reflexive undercurrent containing commentary on sexism and self-idealization that’s provocative, and sometimes disturbing.” Read more…)

Moana (Disney animated feature, Auli’i Cravalho. Rotten Tomatoes 95%. Metacritic: 81. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Moana is the daughter of a chief and will someday inherit her father’s position, but she’s furious when Maui, a tattooed, muscle-bound demigod, calls her a princess. Moana [MWAH-nah] is not only part of a dynastic line but also a girl off on an adventure in the company of a cute animal sidekick [a dimwitted chicken named Heihei]. So not just any princess, in other words: a Disney princess. She may be on a quest to save her island and restore ecological balance to the planet, but Moana [voiced by Auli’i Cravalho] is also upholding a brand.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
Jackie
Moana

New Foreign
Tanna (Australia, drama, Marie Wawa. Rotten Tomatoes 87%. Metacritic: 75. From Glenn Kenny’s New York Times review: “Named for the remote South Pacific island where it was filmed, ‘Tanna’ is a movie in which every single shot is picturesque, and more than a few of them are genuinely beautiful. For a North American viewer, it may serve two functions of cinema: showing a remote and unfamiliar place and culture, while also kicking up questions of how Western cinema sees cultural difference.” Read more…)

Miss Hokusai (Japan, animated feature, English & Japanese soundtrack, Erica Lindbeck [voice]. Rotten Tomatoes 94%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “Japanese animated film practically teems with plucky, inventive girls, but pictures depicting emotionally credible young women are relatively rare. That ‘Miss Hokusai’ does this very thing, and does it beautifully, is only one of the extraordinary things about it. Adapted from a Hinako Sugiura manga, ‘Miss Hokusai’ is a lively inquiry into the life of O-Ei Hokusai, a daughter of the 19th-century painter Katsushika Hokusai [one of whose most famous images, ‘The Great Wave,’ is cleverly alluded to in an early scene].” Read more…)

Departure (France, drama, Alex Lawther. Rotten Tomatoes 92%.)

New American Back Catalog (post-1960)
Film (1965, Samuel Beckett drama/comedy, Buster Keaton)

New British
Wuthering Heights (2011, Emily Brontë romance, James Howson. Rotten Tomatoes 69%. Metacritic: 70. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Too often, great works of literature arrive on screen weighed down by their reputations, immobilized in a straitjacket of cultural prestige. Emily Brontë’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ is a wild emanation of Victorian genius half-tamed by time and term papers, and Andrea Arnold’s new film adaptation is an admirable, frustrating attempt to strip away the novel’s inherited “classic” status and restore its raw and earthy passion.” Read more…)

New TV
The Americans: Season 4 (espionage drama, Keri Russell. Rotten Tomatoes 99%. Metacritic: 95.)

New Documentaries
NotFilm (Samuel Beckett, Buster Keaton, avant-garde cinema/theater. Rotten Tomatoes 92%. Metacritic: 81. Frtom A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “[Samuel Beckett and Buster Keaton] can also look like kindred artistic spirits, committed to formal rigor and possessing finely tuned comic sensibilities. It is not surprising — though it is also, somehow, astonishing — that they worked together once, on a film devised by Beckett and titled ‘Film.’ A little more than 20 minutes long, devoid of dialogue [though not of sound], it was made in New York in the summer of 1965. And it is now the subject of an intelligent, affectionate documentary by Ross Lipman, titled ‘Notfilm.'” Read more…)

New Children’s DVDs
Moana (Disney animated feature, Auli’i Cravalho. Rotten Tomatoes 95%. Metacritic: 81. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Moana is the daughter of a chief and will someday inherit her father’s position, but she’s furious when Maui, a tattooed, muscle-bound demigod, calls her a princess. Moana [MWAH-nah] is not only part of a dynastic line but also a girl off on an adventure in the company of a cute animal sidekick [a dimwitted chicken named Heihei]. So not just any princess, in other words: a Disney princess. She may be on a quest to save her island and restore ecological balance to the planet, but Moana [voiced by Auli’i Cravalho] is also upholding a brand.” Read more…)

Miss Hokusai (Japan, animated feature, English & Japanese soundtrack, Erica Lindbeck [voice]. Rotten Tomatoes 94%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “Japanese animated film practically teems with plucky, inventive girls, but pictures depicting emotionally credible young women are relatively rare. That ‘Miss Hokusai’ does this very thing, and does it beautifully, is only one of the extraordinary things about it. Adapted from a Hinako Sugiura manga, ‘Miss Hokusai’ is a lively inquiry into the life of O-Ei Hokusai, a daughter of the 19th-century painter Katsushika Hokusai [one of whose most famous images, ‘The Great Wave,’ is cleverly alluded to in an early scene].” Read more…)

New releases 2/28/16

Top Hits
Moonlight (coming-of-age drama, Trevante Rhodes. Rotten Tomatoes: 98%. Metacritic: 99. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “To describe ‘Moonlight,’ Barry Jenkins’s second feature, as a movie about growing up poor, black and gay would be accurate enough. It would also not be wrong to call it a movie about drug abuse, mass incarceration and school violence. But those classifications are also inadequate, so much as to be downright misleading. It would be truer to the mood and spirit of this breathtaking film to say that it’s about teaching a child to swim, about cooking a meal for an old friend, about the feeling of sand on skin and the sound of waves on a darkened beach, about first kisses and lingering regrets. Based on the play ‘In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue’ by Tarell Alvin McCraney, ‘Moonlight’ is both a disarmingly, at times almost unbearably personal film and an urgent social document, a hard look at American reality and a poem written in light, music and vivid human faces.” Read more…)

Allied (romantic thriller, Brad Pitt. Rotten Tomatoes: 62%. Metacritic: 60. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “[Director Robert] Zemeckis has made more ambitious, more dazzling films — as a dogmatic anti-Gumpian, my list of favorites would include ‘Back to the Future,’ ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ and ‘Cast Away’ — but this one may be the purest and most relaxed demonstration of his mastery. Like Steven Spielberg’s ‘Bridge of Spies,’ it infuses a venerable genre and a familiar period with new interest.” Read more…)

Rules Don’t Apply (1950s Hollywood period drama, Lily Collins. Rotten Tomatoes: 55%. Metacritic: 59. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “In his 1998 comedy, ‘Bluworth,’ [actor/director Warren] Beatty reinvented himself as a truth-spouting politician disseminating his liberal message in the language of rap: a vocabulary that, as wielded by Mr. Beatty, rang as simultaneously ridiculous and pointedly articulate. And in the smart, hugely entertaining ‘Rules Don’t Apply,’ Mr. Beatty expands his absurdist vision of politics and show business to take in Hollywood, where he has reigned as an enigmatic glamour boy turned statesman with serious talent for nearly 60 years.” Read more…)

Chronic (drama, Tim Roth. Rotten Tomatoes: 76%. Metacritic: 69. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “In the quietly devastating ‘Chronic,’ Tim Roth, never more impressive onscreen, plays David, a palliative care worker whose intimacy with death and dying both scares and shames family members who nervously peek in on loved ones they have more or less abandoned. The first English-language film by Michel Franco, the Mexican director of ‘After Lucia,’ a harrowing study of high school bullying, ‘Chronic’ stands back from its characters, which it views with a cold documentarylike detachment. Radically unsentimental, it portrays the end of life largely without the emotional concomitants of grief, suffering and solace. Its icy aura of inevitability befits a film whose central character goes from client to client like a polite, expressionless deputy of the Grim Reaper.” Read more…)

Shut In (psychological thriller, Naomi Watts. Rotten Tomatoes: 6%. Metacritic: 25. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “f you’re in any doubt as to the dearth of decent movie roles available to women of a certain age — certain never to see 40 again, at any rate — then buy a ticket for ‘Shut In.’ In this achingly inept thriller, you will see Naomi Watts do what she can to sell a plot of such preposterousness that the derisory laughter around me began barely 20 minutes in.” Read more…)

Doctor Strange (comic book action/fantasy, Benedict Cumberbatch. Rotten Tomatoes: 90%. Metacritic: 72. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “Most Marvel movies open like Robert Downey Jr.’s stand-up routine in ‘Iron Man’ before it goes south. They deliver quips and silky come-hither nonsense, only to end up like a big green monster stuck on rewind: “Hulk smash!” again and again, ad infinitum. In between start and finish, there are moments of levity and discovery in the machined product, but too often you can’t see the movie for Marvel’s action plan. Its latest, the giddily enjoyable ‘Doctor Strange,’ is part of Marvel’s strategy for world domination, yet it’s also so visually transfixing, so beautiful and nimble that you may even briefly forget the brand.” Read more…)

London Road (true crime, Olivia Colman. Rotten Tomatoes: 77%. Metacritic: 71. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ Times review: “An ungainly yet strangely captivating oddity, ‘London Road’ snags your attention from the get-go in the manner of any razor-edge experiment: By making you wonder, what on earth? As soon as that question is answered, however, you’re hooked, and this unconventional examination of the ripple effect of real-life killings on a quiet English town has worked its curious magic.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
Moonlight
Rules Don’t Apply
Doctor Strange

New Foreign
The Weissensee Saga: Season 1 (Germany, 1980s period drama, Uwe Kockisch)
Kiki: Love to Love (Spain, erotic comedy, Alex Garcia. Rotten Tomatoes: 80%.)

New British
A Place to Call Home: Season 4 (Australia drama series, Marta Dusseldorp)

New Documentaries
Kate Plays Christine (documentary/thriller, psychology, journalism, cinema, Kate Lyn Sheil. Rotten Tomatoes: 81%. Metacritic: 75. From Stephen Holden’s New York Times review; “This all-but-forgotten story is dredged up in Robert Greene’s ‘Kate Plays Christine,’ a movie that provocatively blurs the line between documentary and fiction. It follows the New York actress Kate Lyn Sheil as she researches the life of Ms. Chubbuck before portraying her in this unsettling cinematic hybrid. The suicide is wrongly thought by some to have inspired Paddy Chayefsky’s screenplay for Sidney Lumet’s 1976 satire, ‘Network,’ whose protagonist, Howard Beale, a network anchorman, inveighing against the evils of television, creates a national sensation by threatening to kill himself while on the air.” Read more…)

Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story (jazz, drug abuse, Frank Morgan. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 75. From Jaworowski’s New York Times review:”In the 1950s, some jazz musicians believed they couldn’t get that Charlie Parker ‘happy-sad feeling without using drugs.’ So says a friend of the saxophonist Frank Morgan in ‘Sound of Redemption,’ a documentary that revels in the happy despite some seriously sad events.” Read more…)

Utopia (Australia race relations, racism, indigenous people, John Pilger. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%.)
Rachel Carson (bio, environmentalism, Rachel Carson)

New Music
Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story (jazz, drug abuse, Frank Morgan. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 75.)

New Children’s DVDs
Christmas All Over Again (holiday family comedy filmed in Connecticut last year, Amber Montana.)

New releases 2/21/17

Top Hits
Manchester By the Sea (Kenneth Lonergan-directed drama, Casey Affleck. Rotten Tomatoes: 96%. Metacritic: 96. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “‘Manchester by the Sea’ is a finely shaded portrait, a study in individual misery set in a place that is observed with care and affection. Mr. Affleck and Mr. Hedges are exceptional, but the rest of the large cast is nearly as fine. [I’d single out Ms. Williams, Ms. Mol and C. J. Wilson, who plays Joe’s best pal and business partner.] The coastal Massachusetts town that gives the movie its name is picturesque in a modest, thrifty New England way. Not breathtaking, but calm and orderly, its hills flecked with tall deciduous trees and clapboard houses, its harbor ringed with low-slung, rocky islands.” Read more…)

Hacksaw Ridge (war drama, Andrew Garfield. Rotten Tomatoes: 86%. Metacritic: 71. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Mel Gibson can be accused of many things, but subtlety is not one of them. Even at his worst — I mean as a filmmaker, not a political thinker — he consistently proves to be an able craftsman and a shrewd showman. ‘Hacksaw Ridge,’ the first feature he has directed since ‘Apocalypto,’ a decade ago, is a bluntly effective faith-and-flag war drama, the true story of a remarkable hero with a knot of moral tension at its center.” Read more…)

Nocturnal Animals (romantic thriller, Amy Adams. Rotten Tomatoes: 73%. Metacritic: 67. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “In its broadest outlines, ‘Nocturnal Animals’ is about art — its creation, reception and power. Art and power are something that Susan [Amy Adfams], who runs a Los Angeles art gallery, understands. They’ve given her cultural capital and money [there’s a Jeff Koons statue next to her pool], yet she isn’t an artist. That distinction belongs to her ex-husband, Edward, a writer who soon after the movie opens sends Susan his latest, ‘Nocturnal Animals,’ a novel that he’s dedicated to her. She’s intrigued — the dedication is a seduction — and, after some domestic melodrama with her husband, Hutton [Armie Hammer], she settles in to read Edward’s novel.” Read more…)

Sophie and the Rising Sun (World War II-era romance drama, Julianne Nicholson. Rotten Tomatoes: 56%. Metacritic: 55. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “The veneer of decorum that cloaks the fictional fishing village of Salty Creek, S.C., does little to smother the stink of prejudice in ‘Sophie and the Rising Sun,’ a genteel love story set in the autumn of 1941 during the run-up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
Manchester By the Sea
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals

New Foreign
A French Village: Season 1 (France, World War II-era drama series, Robin Renucci)

New American Back Catalog (post-1960)
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (1982, Broadway stage production, Angela Lansbury)

New Documentaries
Seasons (nature doc from filmmakers of Winged Migration, forests. Rotten Tomatoes: 96%. Metacritic: 67. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “Beginning in edenic tranquillity and ending in death and destruction, ‘Seasons,’ the mesmeric nature documentary from Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud, doesn’t make you feel particularly proud to be human. Neither did their previous collaborations, ‘Winged Migration’ in 2003 and ‘Oceans’ seven years later, which were beautifully photographed entreaties to stop ravaging our wildlife. Having checked off fish and fowl, the filmmakers now turn to land animals, traversing millenniums to explore the fate of the vast forests that blanketed Europe after the last ice age.” Read more…)

Speed Sisters (Palestinian women race car drivers. Rotten Tomatoes: 91%. Metacritic: 65. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “Unconventional in form as well as content, ‘Speed Sisters’ is a sports-underdog documentary that pays only lip service to the genre’s typical strive-setback-win narrative arc. Loose and unforced, this debut feature from Amber Fares explores the rewards and challenges of belonging to the first female streetcar racing team in the Middle East.” Read more…)

Marinoni (bicycle manufacturing, riding. Rotten Tomatoes: 67%. Metacritic: 40. From Daniel M. Gold’s New York Times review: “‘Marinoni: The Fire in the Frame,’ a documentary by Tony Girardin, opens with Giuseppe Marinoni bent over a bicycle he’s building, welding torch in hand, in his workshop near Montreal. He doesn’t enjoy having the camera around, and hates talking about himself: ‘The welds can feel the stress,’ he complains. Once a champion cyclist who went to Canada to race and never left, Mr. Marinoni, 75, is now a master craftsman whose bicycles are prized by devotees.” Read more…)

Casablancas: The Man Who Loved Women (bio, supermodels, John Casablancas)

New releases 2/14/17

Top Hits
Arrival (sci-fi, Amy Adams. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 81. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “‘Arrival’ is a science-fiction parable in a distinctly more idealistic hopeful key than most movies in this genre, one in which the best solutions don’t necessarily materialize in a gun sight. It has a little action, a bit of violence and clenched-jawed jittery men. Mostly, it has ideas and hope, as well as eerie extraterrestrials who face off with a soulful linguist-heroine, Louise Banks [Amy Adams], the story’s voice of reason and its translator. She’s thoughtful, serious, at ease with her own silence and fears. She’d get along fine with Sandra Bullock’s character in ‘Gravity,’ which like this movie leans into feeling and thinking, and reminds you again that there’s more to this genre than heavy artillery.” Read more…)

Christine (drama, Rebecca Hall. Rotten Tomatoes: 88%. Metacritic: 72. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “Every so often, an actor takes possession of a role so thoroughly — turning each line, flickering look and gesture into an expression of being — that she becomes your way into the movie as well as the reason you keep watching. That’s the case with Rebecca Hall, the star of ‘Christine,’ a period drama about a television reporter, Christine Chubbuck, that plays more like an autopsy than like a biopic. In 1974 Ms. Chubbuck shot herself on the air, possibly becoming the first person to commit suicide on live TV. The ancient Romans had the Colosseum; we have television.” Read more…)

Gimme Danger (music bio, Iggy & The Stooges, Jim Jarmusch. Rotten Tomatoes: 95%. Metacritic: 72.. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “Considering the frenzied psychedelic circus it might have been, ‘Gimme Danger,’ Jim Jarmusch’s reverent documentary portrait of Iggy Pop, one of rock’s ultimate daredevil provocateurs, is downright prim. There are casual confessions of self-destructive, out-of-control behavior by Iggy Pop and his band, the Stooges. But you don’t see it. You only hear about it, and it’s glossed over as yesterday’s bad-boy antics.” Read more…)

The Edge of Seventeen (comedy, Woody Harrelson. Rotten Tomatoes: 95%. Metacritic: 77. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “To call ‘The Edge of Seventeen’ one of the best films about high school kids in 25 years isn’t to say it’s a masterpiece. In its raw honesty, it barely begins to approach Marielle Heller’s far tougher, more realistic ‘The Diary of a Teenage Girl,’ whose sexually curious 15-year-old title character entices her mother’s boyfriend into a clandestine affair. But it can hold its own against ‘The Perks of Being a Wallflower,’ ‘Clueless’ and other movies that have raised the bar on teenage movies.” Read more…)

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (war drama, Joe Alwyn. Rotten Tomatoes: 45%. Metacritic: 53. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “In 2004, George W. Bush was in the White House, Beyoncé was in Destiny’s Child and more than 100,000 American troops were in Iraq. Whether or not this could be called a more innocent time, innocence is the central idea — the premise, the moral, the scarlet letter and the white whale — of ‘Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,’ which takes place in that not-so-distant year. Directed by Ang Lee and adapted from Ben Fountain’s novel, a National Book Award finalist in 2012, the movie is dominated by the baby blues and shy smile of its title character, an Army specialist from a small town in Texas. Billy [Joe Alwyn] and the other surviving members of Bravo Company, having endured a hellish firefight in Iraq, find themselves in equally surreal if less perilous circumstances back in the U.S.A., where they have been conscripted into the halftime show of a Thanksgiving Day professional football game.” Read more…)

Bleed For This (sports drama, Miles Teller. Rotten Tomatoes: 71%. Metacritic: 62. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “[Lead actor Miles] Teller first plays his boxer as a hardheaded, generally likable mook — a bit of a bad boy, but over all an emblem of the integrity of the working-class athlete. After the accident, the portrayal deepens, and delivers substantial emotional dividends without yielding to facile sentimentality. As his trainer, Mr. Eckhart is similarly committed. Mr. Younger’s direction is focused and sometimes disarming — scenes that at first seem like slice-of-life digressions, such as a postaccident surprise birthday party for the protagonist, lead to unexpected mini-epiphanies.” Read more…)

Priceless (drama, Joel Smallbone. Metacritic: 41.)

New Blu-Ray
Arrival
The Edge of Seventeen

New Foreign
Disorder (France, thriller, Matthias Schoenaerts. Rotten Tomatoes: 73%. Metacritic: 66. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Alice Winocour’s ‘Disorder’ is a tightly wound spring of a movie, a tour de force of sound design and sly editing that implies much more than it shows. The premise is simple. A twitchy, traumatized veteran returns to France from a Central Asian war zone and picks up some security work during what he hopes will be a short interval between tours of duty. A fairly straightforward assignment ‘babysitting’ the wife and son of a well-connected rich guy turns out to be more complicated and dangerous than anyone expected.” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Gimme Danger (music bio, Iggy & The Stooges, Jim Jarmusch. Rotten Tomatoes: 95%. Metacritic: 72.. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “Considering the frenzied psychedelic circus it might have been, ‘Gimme Danger,’ Jim Jarmusch’s reverent documentary portrait of Iggy Pop, one of rock’s ultimate daredevil provocateurs, is downright prim. There are casual confessions of self-destructive, out-of-control behavior by Iggy Pop and his band, the Stooges. But you don’t see it. You only hear about it, and it’s glossed over as yesterday’s bad-boy antics.” Read more…)

All Things Must Pass (Tower Records story. Rotten Tomatoes: 97%. Metacritic: 73. From Andy Webster’s New York Times review: “‘Everybody in a record store is a little bit your friend for 20 minutes or so,’ says Bruce Springsteen in Colin Hanks’ breezy documentary ‘All Things Must Pass,’ an examination of the ill-fated trajectory of the Tower Records empire. To anyone who has ever savored a chat with a record store clerk about nuggets in a pop artist’s catalog, the sentiment is familiar. This movie makes you appreciate anew the one-on-one social dimension lost in the music industry’s headlong switch to digital downloads.” Read more…)

New Music DVDs
Gimme Danger (music bio, Iggy & The Stooges, Jim Jarmusch)

New Children’s DVDs
Scooby-Doo: Shaggy’s Showdown

New releases 2/7/17

Top Hits
Loving (historical drama, Ruth Negga. Rotten Tomatoes: 89%. Metacritic: 79. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Manohla Dargis’ Times review: “There are few movies that speak to the American moment as movingly — and with as much idealism — as Jeff Nichols’s ‘Loving,’ which revisits the era when blacks and whites were so profoundly segregated in this country that they couldn’t always wed. It’s a fictionalization of the story of Mildred and Richard Loving, a married couple who were arrested in 1958 because he was white, she was not, and they lived in Virginia, a state that banned interracial unions. Virginia passed its first anti-miscegenation law in 1691, partly to prevent what it called ‘spurious issue,’ or what most people just call children.” Read more…)

American Pastoral (drama, Ewan McGregor. Rotten Tomatoes: 23%. Metacritic: 43. From Stephen Holden’s New York Times review: “First, the half-good news about Ewan McGregor’s streamlined screen adaptation of Philip Roth’s 1997 novel, ‘American Pastoral’: The movie is not a desecration but a severe diminution of a complex literary masterpiece. This shallow but watchable gloss on a book that conjures a searing image of the disintegrating American dream in the 1960s, especially as it pertains to Jewish identity and aspiration, amounts to not much more than a dutiful checklist of scenes from the novel. And its elegiac tone omits Mr. Roth’s bitterly sarcastic humor.” Read more…)

Burn Country (thriller, Dominic Rains. Rotten Tomatoes: 60%. Metacritic: 60. From Neil Genzlinger’s New York Times review: “Dominic Rains is quietly captivating in ‘Burn Country,’ an amorphous study in table-turning directed by Ian Olds, a documentarian who is trying his first feature.” Read more…)

Trolls (Dreamworks animated feature, Anna Kendrick [voice]. Rotten Tomatoes: 74%. Metacritic: 56. From Andy Webster’s New York Times review: “Exuberant, busy and sometimes funny, DreamWorks Animation’s ‘Trolls’ is determined to amuse. You remember Trolls — not the rude lurkers online writing nasty remarks, but those little toys with round tummies, beatific expressions and abundant hair shooting upward. Here they’re players in a fairy-tale Cold War parable.” Read more…)

Danny Says (New Haven-based Brendan Toller’s bio of Danny Fields, rock counterculture figure, punk. “Danny Says” had a rough cut screening at Best Video in 2014. Rotten Tomatoes: 68%. Metacritic: 64. From Ben Kenigsberg’s New York Times review: “To hear it from the new documentary ‘Danny Says,’ Danny Fields had a hand in the breakup of the Beatles and the discovery of the Ramones. He palled around with the photographer Linda Eastman ]a.k.a. Linda McCartney]. He tried playing matchmaker for Jim Morrison and Nico, an introduction that resulted in a strange stare-down. He signed MC5 and the Stooges to Elektra in one swoop. He tripped on acid on the floor of Leonard Cohen and Judy Collins’s hotel room. To paraphrase one of the many friends who share stories of Mr. Fields in this anecdotal, loosely structured movie, he’s the guy who would talk you into buying some sort of abstract painting before the work was widely understood. Variously a journalist, a publicist and a Zelig-like gadfly of the music scene, he had a consistent ear for the next new thing.” Read more…)

Frank & Lola (noir romance, Michael Shannon. Rotten Tomatoes: 66%. Metacritic: 56. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “Its title is an early tip-off that “Frank & Lola” will be a new riff on Frankie and Johnny’s old troubles. Immortalized in song and onstage, these two have lent their names and heartache to a couple of films. [The movie shares its title with a Jimmy Buffett song.] They’re back in shadow form in ‘Frank & Lola,’ this time with an unpersuasively paired Michael Shannon and Imogen Poots as Las Vegas souls who, after tumbling into bed, fall for each other. Soon, Frank and Lola learn that love still hurts, especially when tendrils of jealously start twisting through the story and he confuses abandon with possession.” Read more…)

Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween (comedy, Tyler Perry. Rotten Tomatoes: 21%. Metacritic: 30. From Glenn Kenny’s New York Times review: “‘Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween’ is Mr. Perry’s 16th feature film as a director, and it shows him just barely more adept in this respect as he was for his first outing, ‘Madea’s Family Reunion’ [2006]. His shot composition is rudimentary at best, his blocking of action is practically indifferent, and his editing rhythms run the gamut from hobbled to stumbling. All of which matters only to the viewer actively looking at those aspects of the picture. Mr. Perry is also an eccentric, inspired performer, and his screen-filling antics as the raucous but righteous Madea — a character who runs through Mr. Perry’s stage, film and TV work — is the truly pertinent component here.” Read more…)

The Take (action/thriller, Idris Elba. Rotten Tomatoes: 46%. Metacritic: 48. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Neil Genzlinger’s Times review: “You’ve got to love the juxtaposition in ‘The Take,’ a tasty thriller directed by James Watkins. Tech- and media-savvy bad guys go up against that most humble of miscreants: a pickpocket. Well, against a pickpocket and a rule-breaking C.I.A. agent. The agent, Sean, is played with growly vigor by Idris Elba, and he pairs perfectly with Richard Madden [Robb Stark from ‘Game of Thrones’], who portrays Michael, the pickpocket.” Read more…)

Desierto (thriller, Gael García Bernal. Rotten Tomatoes: 60%. Metacritic: 51. From Neil Genzlinger’s New York Times review: “Jonás Cuarón and his cinematographer, Damian Garcia, make the desert look bleakly beautiful in ‘Desierto,’ right from the opening landscape shot. But there’s nothing beautiful about the story the film tells, and nothing redeeming, either.” Read more…)

Kevin Hart: What Now (standup comedy performance. Rotten Tomatoes: 76%. Metacritic: 60. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Times review: “A performer who can sell out a football stadium with the promise of delivering not much more than a stand-up comedy routine can safely be called ‘critic proof.’ So I understand that my opinion of the comedy offered by Kevin Hart, who set a record for packing Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia in August 2015, where this concert movie was filmed, is likely to be immaterial. In any event, I thought about two-thirds of ‘Kevin Hart: What Now?’ was pretty-to-very funny, and one third meh.” Read more…)

Justice League: Dark (R-rated animated superhero feature)

New Blu-Ray
Loving

New Foreign
The Eagle Huntress (Kazakhstan, documentary, Aisholpan. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%. Metacritic: 72. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “Aisholpan is a 13-year-old girl who lives in Mongolia, dividing her time between a boarding school and her nomadic family’s campsite. With the release of ‘The Eagle Huntress,’ a thrilling new documentary directed by Otto Bell, she may well become something else: a pop-culture heroine with the power to inspire girls (and not only girls) everywhere. It would not be surprising on future Halloweens to spot a handful of Aisholpans, dressed in traditional fur-and-embroidery hunting gear, pigtails fastened with pink bows, amid the throngs of Elsas and Katnisses.” Read more…)

Mediterraneo (Italy, 1991, comedy/drama, Nicola Lorusso. Rotten Tomatoes: 77%. From Vincent Canby’s 192 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “Gabriele Salvatores’s “Mediterraneo” is a deliberately charming comedy whose most daring conceit is that love, in one form and another, makes the world go around. Actually, it’s somewhat better than it sounds, having the good sense not to slop over into the sentimentality that awaits it at every turn.” Read more…)

Fellini’s Casanova (Italy, 1976, historical drama/romance, Donald Sutherland. From Vincent Canby’s 1977 new York Times review [requires log-in]: “‘Fellini’s Casanova’ recalls ‘Fellini’s Satyricon.’ Though its concerns are narrower, it’s as otherworldly as that nightmare vision of the pre-Christian Roman Empire. Like that film, too, ‘Casanova’ makes no attempt to recreate an identifiable era, but, rather, to create a completely subjective impression.” Read more…)

New American Back Catalog (post-1960)
Roar (1981, thriller, Tippi Hedren. Rotten Tomatoes: 72%. From Simon Abrams’ review on RogerEbert.com: “If you go see ‘Roar,’ a now-infamous 1981 ethnographic action film starring untrained wild cats, you probably will go expecting to see a memorably weird curio. This is a movie with a poster, commissioned by the cult film buffs at Drafthouse Films, that uses injuries sustained by 70 cast and crew members as a selling point [the poster’s tagline: ‘No animals were harmed in the making of this film. 70 cast and crew members were.’]. ‘Roar’ may often feel like a bizarre Swiss Family Robinson adventure, but the real reason you should go see it is its surplus of lions, and tigers, and cheetahs [oh my!]. I confess that, as a feline aficionado, I got what I wanted from ‘Roar’: lots and lots of big cats. There’s not much to the film beyond that, though knowing that the film’s hulking furry stars weren’t trained does add an element of suspense to an otherwise slack thriller. Still, if you want to see cats chasing people in packs, falling over themselves to descend stairwells, and jump up trees to swipe at disposable human protagonists–you will probably enjoy ‘Roar.'” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Cameraperson (cinematography, documentary, Kirsten Johnson. Rotten Tomatoes: 99%. Metacritic: 86. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “‘Cameraperson’ Kirsten Johnson’s transfixing documentary, defies easy summary. It’s unlike anything you’ve seen before, although if you remember films like Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering Kofman’s ‘Derrida’ or Whitney Dow and Marco Williams’s ‘Two Towns of Jasper,’ some of the images may be familiar. Ms. Johnson worked as a cinematographer on those documentaries and dozens of others, but the footage she shares here doesn’t come from the finished films. It includes outtakes, offhand moments, snatches of time when the camera just happened to be running. ‘These are the images that marked me,’ she says in an introductory note, and she has woven them together into a unique and affecting memoir.” Read more…)

Danny Says (Brendan Toller’s bio of Danny Fields, rock counterculture figure, punk. Rotten Tomatoes: 68%. Metacritic: 64. From Ben Kenigsberg’s New York Times review: “To hear it from the new documentary ‘Danny Says,’ Danny Fields had a hand in the breakup of the Beatles and the discovery of the Ramones. He palled around with the photographer Linda Eastman [a.k.a. Linda McCartney]. He tried playing matchmaker for Jim Morrison and Nico, an introduction that resulted in a strange stare-down. He signed MC5 and the Stooges to Elektra in one swoop. He tripped on acid on the floor of Leonard Cohen and Judy Collins’s hotel room. To paraphrase one of the many friends who share stories of Mr. Fields in this anecdotal, loosely structured movie, he’s the guy who would talk you into buying some sort of abstract painting before the work was widely understood. Variously a journalist, a publicist and a Zelig-like gadfly of the music scene, he had a consistent ear for the next new thing.” Read more…)

New Children’s DVDs
Cloud 9 (Disney snowboarding, Dove Cameron)

New releases 1/30/17

Top Hits
Queen of Katwe (family drama, David Oyelowo. Rotten Tomatoes: 92%. Metacritic: 73. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “‘Irresistible’ is one of those adjectives that critics should handle with utmost care. No matter how universally charming or winning a movie or a performance might seem to be, there is always a chance that somebody, somewhere, will be able to resist it. For all I know that may be the case with ‘Queen of Katwe,’ but if there is anyone out there capable of remaining unmoved by this true-life triumph-of-the-underdog sports story, I don’t think I want to meet that person.” Read more…)

Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (action, Tom Cruise. Rotten Tomatoes: 37%. Metacritic: 47. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “‘Jack Reacher: Never Go Back’ is the second movie that Tom Cruise has starred in as this title character. Let’s hope it’s the last. Mr. Cruise deserves better, as do his loyalists, who have stuck with him through the good and the bad, both in perfectly tailored roles that failed to impress audiences [‘Edge of Tomorrow’] and in roles that were unworthy of all his work and our love [‘Oblivion’]. In recent years, only the apparently indestructible ‘Mission: Impossible’ franchise has provided him with a steady vehicle for his talents as well as for a ride to box-office success.” Read more…)

Masterminds (action/comedy, Zach Galifianakis. Rotten Tomatoes: 32%. Metacritic: 47. From Glenn Kenny’s New York Times review: “‘I blame popular culture,’ Zach Galifianakis says at the start of this comedy, the ridiculousness of his Southern accent rivaling that of his very fluffy hairstyle. His character, David Ghantt — a real-life felon who took part in an ostentatious crime in the late 1990s — is rationalizing his own miscreant deeds for the audience of ‘Masterminds,’ a would-be memorable piece of popular culture that applies the TV-sketch-show-surreal-farce approach to a based-on-true-events caper picture.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
Jack Reacher: Never Go Back
Annie
My Neighbor Totoro

New Foreign
The Handmaiden (South Korea, thriller, Kim Tae-Ri. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 84. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Times review: “The art of the tease is rarely as refined as in ‘The Handmaiden.’ Set in Korea in the 1930s, this amusingly slippery entertainment is an erotic fantasy about an heiress, her sadistic uncle, her devoted maid and the rake who’s trying to pull off a devilishly elaborate con. The same could be said of the director Park Chan-wook, whose attention to voluptuous detail — to opulent brocades and silky robes, luscious peaches and creamy shoulders — turns each scene into an invitation to ooh, aah and mmm. This is a movie that tries to ravish your senses so thoroughly you may not notice its sleights of hand.” Read more…)

Mountain (Israel, drama, Shani Kein)

New American Back Catalog (post-1960)
Love Affair (1994, romance, Warren Beatty. Rotten Tomatoes: 31%. From Janet Maslin’s 1994 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “Warren Beatty isn’t quite Cary Grant in ‘Love Affair,’ though he plays the same ladies’ man Grant made so fabulously debonair in Leo McCarey’s 1957 ‘An Affair to Remember.’ [Charles Boyer also played this role, in 1939.] Surprisingly, he isn’t quite Warren Beatty either.  Never has Mr. Beatty seemed less foxy or confident than he does playing out this star-crossed romance opposite his real-life spouse, Annette Bening, who has the once glamorous Deborah Kerr role [played earlier by Irene Dunne]. A rule of thumb for male stars looking to set off flirtatious sparks: not with your wife, you don’t. Not on screen.” Read more…)

New British
Victoria: Season 1 (historical drama, Jenna Coleman)

New Documentaries
Harry and Snowman (horse competition, heartwarming. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Helen T. Verongos’ Times review: “The Snowman of Ron Davis’s documentary ‘Harry and Snowman’ is a horse that melts the heart. Purchased in the 1950s for $80 off a truck bound for the slaughterhouse, Snowman became a champion show jumper. And that was only one surprise in the long friendship that began when this scruffy white gelding locked eyes with Harry deLeyer, who raised horses and taught riding at a girls’ school in Long Island.” Read more…)

Electric Boogaloo: The Wild Untold Story of Cannon Films (film history, Cannon Films, Yoram Globus, Menahem Golan. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%. From Manohla Dargis’s New York Times article: “Energetically directed by Mark Hartley, ‘Electric Boogaloo’ features the usual all-star talking heads, among them the Swedish slab Dolph Lundgren and the director Tobe Hooper, who made ‘The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part 2’ for Cannon. Mr. Hartley taps plenty of entertaining archival material, some dating from Mr. Golan and Mr. Globus’s scrappy start in Israel. Mr. Golan, who directed his share of movies and died in 2014, registers as the more flamboyant and touching of the two, partly because movies were clearly his life’s passion and not just a long hustle. The talking heads are informative and often entertaining and not only because a number of the Cannon grunts and glitterati take such joy in imitating Mr. Globus and Mr. Golan’s accented English.” Read more…)

New releases 1/24/17

Top Hits
The Light Between Oceans (romance, Michael Fassbender. Rotten Tomatoes: 60%. Metacritic: 60. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “The movie, directed by Derek Cianfrance [‘Blue Valentine,’ ‘The Place Beyond the Pines’], envelops the image of a lonely, brooding sentinel gazing out over the water in the seething atmosphere of a Winslow Homer seascape. And Alexandre Desplat’s lush score washes over it like an endless tide. The film’s solemn visual rhythms exert an almost hypnotic spell that for a time gives a heroic dimension to a story as emotionally fraught as a vintage Bette Davis melodrama.” Read more…)

The Vessel (faith-based drama, Martin Sheen. Rotten Tomatoes: 65%. Metacritic: 67. From Andy Webster’s New York Times review: “Julio Quintana’s ‘The Vessel’ is a modest, but not maudlin, parable of hope about mustering the strength to vigorously plunge again into life’s uncertainties after a devastating loss.” Read more…)

The Inferno (action thriller, Tom Hanks. Rotten Tomatoes: 19%. Metacritic: 42. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “Late in ‘Inferno,’ Tom Hanks blurts out, ‘My God, this is a labyrinth.’ Well, of course it is, because Mr. Hanks is running [and running] through another muddled Dan Brown maze. Once again, this one comes to you from the director Ron Howard and his producing partner, Brian Grazer, who bring clenched-jaw commitment and a whole mess of filmmaking to every project, even the most disposable. In this case, the story may not make any sense, but they’re going to throw so much at you — so many jumpy moves, so many tangled threads — that you might not notice [or care].” Read more…)

The Monster (drama/horror, Zoe Kazan. Rotten Tomatoes: 78%. Metacritic: 76. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “Monstrous motherhood has never gone out of fashion, including in movies — recent examples include ‘The Babadook’ and ‘Goodnight Mommy’ — that are more obvious fodder for art houses than for multiplexes. ‘The Monster’ is cleverly pitched somewhere in between, with the kind of generous splatters that evoke the good old nasty days of grindhouse horror and enough sleek, self-conscious moves for festival play dates. Part of the ticklish enjoyment in ‘The Monster’ is how the director, Bryan Bertino [‘The Strangers’], plays with genre registers and how, after opening with disquieting stillness and an isolated child, he slowly yet surely turns up the shrieks.” Read more…)

The Men’s Club (drama, David Dukes)

New British
Sherlock: Season 4 (modern-day mysteries, Benedict Cumberbatch. Rotten Tomatoes: 61%)

New releases 1/17/17

Top Hits
Girl_TrainThe Girl On the Train (thriller, Emily Blunt. Rotten Tomatoes: 43%. Metacritic: 48. From Manohla Dargis’ New York Times review: “‘The Girl on the Train’ is a preposterous movie but not an unenjoyable one. If that sounds like faint praise, well, it is and it isn’t. There’s always something to be said for an entertainment that sustains its nuttiness all the way to its twisty finish. This one may not make much sense, but — like a demented old film noir or a Shonda Rhimes show at its crazed best — ‘Girl’ doesn’t falter in its absurdity or commitment to its own seriousness. It never winks. You may laugh [as the audience I saw it with did, on and off], but there’s genuine pleasure in that mirth.” Read more…)

Keeping Up With the Joneses (action comedy, Zach Galifianakis. Rotten Tomatoes: 19%. Metacritic: 34. From Ben Kenigsberg’s New York Times review: “One way to end the scourge of ‘TV is better than film’ articles is to stop making movies like ‘Keeping Up With the Joneses,’ a pedestrian comedy that almost seems intended as evidence for the cause. The plot invites comparisons to ‘The Americans’; the presence of Jon Hamm as a man of mystery prompsts wistful memories of ‘Mad Men’; and the visual vocabulary — no one has bothered to address the abundance of overlit and sun-bleached shots — shows the indifference of a hasty live broadcast.” Read more…)

Ouija: Origin of Evil (horror, Elizabeth Reaser. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. Metacritic: 65. Believe it or not, a New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Neil Genzlinger’s Times review: “Perhaps you weren’t impressed with ‘Ouija,’ the 2014 horror movie inspired by the Hasbro game. Critics certainly weren’t. But its new prequel, ‘Ouija: Origin of Evil,’ is deliciously creepy, thanks largely to a terrific performance by the youngest of its stars.” Read more…)

Touched_with_FireTouched With Fire (romance, Katie Holmes. Rotten Tomatoes: 70%. Metacritic: 62. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “‘Touched With Fire’ is an actor’s field day, and both [Luke] Kirby and [Katie] Holmes boldly meet the challenge of playing bright, high-strung artists struggling with depression. Like Jack Nicholson’s Randle Patrick McMurphy in ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ and Angelina Jolie’s Lisa in ‘Girl, Interrupted,’ they can appear supersane until their daredevil behavior reveals them as recklessly, self-destructively messianic. Their shared mania slightly contorts their faces and glazes their eyes, especially Mr. Kirby’s. And when Marco and Carla flee to the woods and drive into a stream to escape a police car, you recognize the degree of their illness.” Read more…)

Long Way North (animated feature, Christa Theret [voice]. Rotten Tomatoes: 98%. Metacritic: 70. From Neil Genzlinger’s New York Times review: “The story isn’t flashy and neither is the animation in ‘Long Way North,’ qualities that give the film a certain low-key charm in an age of fast-moving sagas eye-poppingly served. This tale, which in its theatrical release is being shown in both English- and French-language versions, has a young heroine, but you won’t mistake it for ‘Frozen.'” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
The Girl On the Train

New Foreign
IxcanulIxcanul (Guatemala, drama, Maria Mercedes Coroy. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 83. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ Times review: “Made with actual Maya farmers in the Guatemalan highlands, this luminous first feature from Jayro Bustamante has scenes of such tactile intimacy that the trust between the director and his mostly nonprofessional cast is unmistakable. Colors are rich and deep [the gorgeous wide-screen cinematography is by Luis Armando Arteaga], and the atmosphere is so tranquil that the whoosh of action in the final third is powerfully disorienting.” Read more…)

Fatima (France, drama, Soria Zeroual. Rotten Tomatoes: 89%. Metacritic: 69. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “‘If my daughter is a success, my happiness is complete,” declares the title character of ‘Fatima,’ a small miracle of a film from the French director Philippe Faucon. Divorced from her husband, whom she followed to France and with whom she is still friendly, Fatima [Soria Zeroual] is a 44-year-old North African woman raising two teenage girls in Lyon. The oldest, Nesrine [Zita Hanrot], 18, is a first-year medical student, and the younger, Souad [Kenza-Noah Aïche], is a sullen, sexy 15-year-old rebel ashamed of her mother for working as a housecleaner.” Read more…)

Train_BusanTrain to Busan (South Korea, zombie action, Gong Yoo. Rotten Tomatoes: 96%. Metacritic: 72. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ Times review: “Elite passengers on a South Korean bullet train face a twitching, hissing threat from the cheap seats in ‘Train to Busan,’ a public-transportation horror movie with a side helping of class warfare. The setup is lean and clean. A flattened deer, mowed down in a quarantine zone in Seoul where some kind of chemical spill has occurred [echoes of Bong Joon-ho’s 2007 enviro-horror film, ‘The Host’], springs back to life. Then, in just a few swiftly efficient scenes, we meet a harried hedge-fund manager and his small, sad daughter [Gong Yoo and an amazing Kim Su-ahn], see them settled on the titular locomotive and watch in dismay as a vividly unwell last-minute passenger lurches onboard. And we’re off!” Read more…)

Closet Monster (Canada, drama/gay & lesbian, Connor Jessup. Rotten Tomatoes: 86%. Metacritic: 81. From Ken Jaworowski’s Times review: “You may find yourself hoping that ‘Closet Monster’ fades to black during one of its few cheerful scenes — that way, the conflicted young man at its center will get a happy ending. This affecting film prompts that kind of concern for its characters. You want them to be safe. You may find yourself hoping that ‘Closet Monster’ fades to black during one of its few cheerful scenes — that way, the conflicted young man at its center will get a happy ending. This affecting film prompts that kind of concern for its characters. You want them to be safe.” Read more…)

 New American Back Catalog DVDs (post-1960)
Two for the Seesaw (1962, romance, Robert MItchum. Rotten Tomatoes: 60%. From Bosley Crowther’s 1962 new York Times review [requires log-in]: “Where the fellow in [playwright William] Gibson’s gimmicked and talkative little play was [and must be] an obviously withdrawing, self-pitying, apologetic type, on the order of Henry Fonda, who, miraculously, originated the role, [Robert] Mitchum is plainly a two-fisted, self-assertive and generally supercilious brute whose feeble attempts to act downtrodden are on the painful side of the absurd. And where the girl in the play was a fireball of emotional vibrancy and energy, [Shirley] MacLaine simply isn’t a fire-ball. She tries to portray one without sufficient fuel.” Read more…)

Something_WildSomething Wild (1961, indie drama, Criterion Collection, Carroll Baker. From Peter Sobczynski’s review of the new Criterion release at RogerEbert.com: “When Jack Garfein’s ‘Something Wild’ was released in 1961, it was mostly savaged by critics, roundly ignored by audiences and quickly slipped into obscurity. It didn’t turn up in revival houses, mentions in reference books were scarce at best and if the title did happen to come up somehow, most people probably mistook it for the 1986 Jonathan Demme movie of the same name. Now, in its highest-profile move since its original release [and probably even higher than that], ‘Something Wild’ has been accorded the honor of joining the Criterion Collection with a special-edition Blu-ray featuring a new transfer and a slew of bonus features offering additional background to the film and its unusual history. As a result, a new generation of viewers will have the opportunity to see it for themselves and realize what fans of the film have known for years—not only was ‘Something Wild’ one of the most audacious and formally radical American movies of the 1960s, it still feels startlingly ahead of its time even more than a half-century since it first came out.” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Palio (horse racing, Italian life. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 73. From Daniel M. Gold’s New York Times review: “Chariots don’t careen around the Colosseum anymore, but the Italian city of Siena still holds a competition from the Middle Ages that evokes a gladiatorial spirit. The Palio, a horse race first recorded in 1238, is a Tuscan feast of civic pride, medieval pageantry and Machiavellian strategies. As Cosima Spender’s ‘Palio’ shows, the race, run twice every summer in the city’s Piazza del Campo in front of about 70,000 screaming fans, is nominally a contest of neighbors: 10 of the city’s contrade, or districts, sponsor horses and hope to secure bragging rights with a victory. Lasting roughly — very roughly — 90 seconds, it’s a kind of equine Nascar event. Horses are ridden into the boards of the oval dirt track, or into one another; jockeys, who ride bareback, are often thrown off their mounts. And since jockeys may make secret deals — even bribes — to help or hinder other riders, scheming is part of the prepwork.” Read more…)

New releases 1/10/17

Top Hits
Deepwater_HorizonDeepwater Horizon (action/disaster, Mark Wahlberg. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. Metacritic: 68. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “‘Deepwater Horizon’ is a swift and suspenseful action movie, full of noise, peril, muck and fire. It’s also a true-crime story, the highly detailed procedural chronicle of how, on April 20, 2010, 11 people were killed and a vast marine ecosystem was despoiled because of negligence and greed. Like ‘The Big Short,’ this film, directed by Peter Berg, dramatizes a broadly familiar story and stands as a work of popular narrative for an age of corporate impunity. The anger and grief you feel leaving the theater constitute a kind of catharsis, a modest symbolic compensation for the failure of justice in the real world.” Read more…)

The Accountant (action/bookkeeping, Ben Affleck. Rotten Tomatoes: 51%. Metacritic: 51. From Stephen Holden’s New York Times review: “Who knows why [Ben] Affleck, looking appropriately dead-eyed and miserable, committed himself to this laborious ultraviolent brain tease of a crime thriller. The movie, directed by Gavin O’Connor [‘Tumbleweeds’], makes little sense. The screenplay, by Bill Dubuque, is so determined to hide its cards that when the big reveal finally arrives, it feels as underwhelming as it is preposterous. And Mr. Affleck, despite a meticulous performance, never uncovers a glimpse of his abused character’s humanity beyond Christian’s carefully delineated symptoms. ” Read more…)

Birth_of_NationThe Birth of a Nation (Nat Turner slave rebellion, Nate Parker. Rotten Tomatoes: 72%. Metacritic: 69. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Which is not to deny that he has attempted something grand and accomplished something real. The movie, uneven as it is, has terrific momentum and passages of concentrated visual beauty. The acting is strong even when the script wanders into thickets of rhetoric and mystification. And despite its efforts to simplify and italicize the story, it’s admirably difficult, raising thorny questions about ends and means, justice and mercy, and the legacy of racism that lies at the root of our national identity. There is still a lot of reckoning to be done. Birth is a messy business. And so is what comes after.” Read more…)

The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let’s Do the Time Warp Again (musical sequel, Laverne Cox. Rotten Tomatoes: 28%. Metacritic: 55. From Neil Genzlinger’s New York Times television review: “Some things can’t be replicated or recaptured, and thanks to Fox we now know that one of them is the subversive magic of ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show.’ On Thursday night, the network serves up its new version of the cult film [for some reason titled ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let’s Do the Time Warp Again’], and although it’s moderately entertaining at times, it never makes clear why it needed to be attempted. That’s the burden of any remake, of course, and from that perspective the project may have been doomed from the start. Certain performances simply can’t be topped.” Read more…)

Homeland: Season 5 (thriller series, Claire Danes. Rotten Tomatoes: 87%. Metacritic: 76.)

New Blu-Ray
Deepwater Horizon
The Accountant

New Foreign
My_KingMy King (France, drama/romance, Vincent Cassel. Rotten Tomatoes: 72%. Metacritic: 68. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ Times review: “Your first thought on seeing Tony (Emmanuelle Bercot), the mentally shredded heroine of ‘My King’ [‘Mon Roi’], recuperating from a skiing calamity might well be “If I have to break a limb, please let me do it in France.” Cocooned in a gleaming rehab center by the ocean, Tony is recovering from more than a torn knee. And while France may or may not offer lust-worthy physical therapy, it has occasionally produced notable cinematic depictions of injurious passion, of which this unblinking portrait of emotional abuse is an especially juicy example.” Read more…)

Ma Ma (Spain, drama, Penelope Cruz. Rotten Tomatoes: 22%. Metacritic: 31. From Andy Webster’s New York Times review: “Penélope Cruz is an Oscar-winning actress we don’t see often enough in prominent leading roles. So how disappointing to find her having to carry Julio Medem’s florid ‘Ma Ma,’ a melodrama only glancing at profundity.” Read more…)

The People Vs. Fritz Bauer (Germany, historical drama, Burghart Klausner. Rotten Tomatoes: 86%. Metacritic: 61. From Ken Jaworowski’s New York Times review: “Fritz Bauer is a mass, and a mess, of contradictions: crafty yet principled, loyal yet friendless, brooding yet driven. Sometimes he charges ahead, other times he bumbles along, usually engulfed in a cloud of tobacco smoke. Burghart Klaussner, playing him in “’he People vs. Fritz Bauer,’ delivers a masterly performance as this complicated man. Appraising the film isn’t nearly as complicated. From start to finish, it’s absorbing. A historical drama that radiates suspense, it often recalls ‘Munich’ and ‘Bridge of Spies’ [in which Mr. Klaussner played a role]. Not to get carried away — ‘Fritz Bauer’ doesn’t have the immediacy or the range of those movies. Yet it has their mood, and that’s more than enough reason to watch.” Read more…)

As I Open My Eyes (Tunisia, political drama, Baya Medhaffer. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “‘I see those deprived of work, of food, of life outside the neighborhood,’ sings Farah [Baya Medhaffar], a fiery 18-year-old Tunisian singer who lights up Leyla Bouzid’s film ‘As I Open My Eyes.’ The film is set in 2010, shortly before Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution ushered in the upheavals of the Arab Spring. The song, with lyrics by Ghassen Amami and music by the eminent Iraqi oud player Khyam Allami, protests the repressive government of Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, Tunisia’s president for 23 years until he fled the country in 2011. It sets the tone of the film in which word of Farah’s dissenting voice reaches the authorities and her safety is endangered. The movie is a sympathetic portrait of the brash, foolhardy Farah, who lives with her fiercely protective mother, Hayet [Ghalia Benali], though she shares her daughter’s rebellious streak.” Read more…)

New Classic DVDs (pre-1960)
His_Girl_FridayHis Girl Friday/The Front Page (Criterion Collection):
His Girl Friday (1940, newspaper screwball comedy, Rosalind Russell. Rotten Tomatoes: 98%. From Frank S. Nugent’s 1940 new York Times review [requires log-in]: “Hysteria is one of the communicable diseases and “His Girl Friday” is a more pernicious carrier than Typhoid Mary. It takes you by the scruff of the neck in the first reel and it shakes you madly, bellowing hoarsely the. while, for the remaining six or seven. Before it’s over you don’t know whether you have been laughing or having your ears boxed. The veriest bit on the strenuous side, if you follow us.” Read more…)

The Front Page (1931, newspaper comedy, Adolphe Menjou.  Rotten Tomatoes: 91%. From Mordaunt Hall’s 1931 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “A witty and virile talking picture has been wrought from ‘The Front Page,’ the play of Chicago newspaper life by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. This film, which is now at the Rivoli, differs but little in construction from the parent work. It is a fast-paced entertainment and, while its humor is frequently harsh, it assuredly won favor with the audience yesterday afternoon.” Read more…)

Carbine Williams (1952, biopic, James Stewart. From Bosley Crowther’s 1952 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “A somewhat bewildering combination of personal attributes, some of them exemplary and some of them sinister and gross, is arranged for almost solid admiration by the people of MGM in a picture called ‘Carbine Williams,’ which came to the Capitol yesterday. Since this is presented as the story of D. Marsh Williams, the fabulous man who invented the Army’s modern carbine, and since James Stewart plays the title role in his customery gaunt and earnest fashion, a certain degree of sentiment is aroused that may not be entirely supported when the elements are carefully analyzed.” Read more…)

 New American Back Catalog DVDs (post-1960)
The Outside Man (1972, thriller directed by French director Jacques Deray, Jean-Louis Trintignant)

New British
Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency: Season 1 (Douglas Adams comedy series, Elijah Wood. Rotten Tomatoes: 72%. Metacritic: 62.)

New TV
Mr. Robot: Season 2 (cyber-security drama, Rami Malek. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 81.)

New Documentaries
The Story of Cats (nature, cheetahs, Fluffy. From Neil Genzlnger’s New York Times television review: “It may have been a mistake to watch ‘The Story of Cats’ with my cat. I’m concerned about some of the ideas the program might have put into her head. ‘The Story of Cats,’ a two-part installment of the PBS series ‘Nature’ that begins on Wednesday, is about all sorts of cats, whether fierce jungle ones or the kind that curl up on the couch. Its overall point is that across the millenniums cats have been supremely skilled at evolving to suit new environments and circumstances.” Read more…)

Black America Since MLK: Still I Rise (civil rights, race, history, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.)