New releases 5/11/21

Top Hits
Land (drama, Robin Wright. Rotten Tomatoes: 70%. Metacritic: 62. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “The beauty of the mountain regions of Alberta, Canada, is presented in modes both lush and piercingly sharp in Robin Wright’s feature directing debut, ‘Land.’ Wright also plays the lead role, Edee, a grieving woman who wants to get away from the world.” Read more…)

Pixie (thriller/comedy, Olivia Cooke. Rotten Tomatoes: 76%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 45. From Cath Clarke’s Guardian review: “Pixie is her name and trouble is her game. ‘She won’t just break you, she’ll take a Kalashnikov to your heart,’ is the warning at the start of this hectic gangster comedy from St Trinian’s director Barnaby Thompson. It features a strong lead performance from Olivia Cooke as Pixie, the step-daughter of a smalltime gangster in the west of Ireland. She’s written as a 21st-century femme fatale, a woman who uses her brains, beauty and cunning to sucker a succession of chumpish men into helping her rob drug dealers of MDMA with a street value of €1m.” Read more…)

The Mauritanian (drama, Tahar Rahim. Rotten Tomatoes: 74%. Metacritic: 53. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “Directed by Kevin Macdonald and based on [Mohamedou Ould] Slahi’s 2015 memoir, the story focuses mainly on the efforts of the defense lawyer Nancy Hollander [Jodie Foster] to obtain a hearing for Slahi and, hopefully, his release. She’s more hindered than helped in this endeavor by a junior associate, Teri Duncan [Shailene Woodley], who’s written with a gullibility that borders on unprofessional.” Read more…)

Beast Beast (drama, Shirley Chen. Rotten Tomatoes: 76%. Metacritic: 55. From Amy Nicholson’s Variety review: “Writer-director Danny Madden’s ‘Beast Beast’ clatters to life with organic percussion: a stick rat-a-tatting against an iron fence, a skateboard scraping on concrete, a rifle pinging bullets against a defenseless tin plate. Together, these sounds combine into jazz, despite the discordance of the three teens making such a ruckus.” Read more…)

Lapsis (drama/thriller, Dean Imperial. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 74. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “‘Lapsis’ is set in an alternate present, but it doesn’t feel that way. A low-budget dig at corporate rapaciousness and the gig economy, this gently comic satire feels entirely in step with the world outside our front doors.” Read more…)

The Marksman (action, Liam Neeson. Rotten Tomatoes: 36%. Metacritic: 44. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “Slow and simple and minimally violent, ‘The Marksman,’ directed by Robert Lorenz, cares more about bonding than brutality. Predictable to a fault, the movie coasts pleasurably on [Liam] Neeson’s seasoned, sad-sweet charisma — an asset that’s been tragically imprisoned in mopey-loner roles and generic action thrillers.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
The Mauritanian

New Foreign DVDs
Nina Wu (China, thriller, Wu Ke-Xi. Rotten Tomatoes: 86%. Metacritic: 66. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Beatrice Loayza’s Times review: “It’s easy enough to slap the #MeToo label on ‘Nina Wu’ and call it a day. Yes, its titular heroine [a remarkable Wu Ke-Xi, also a co-writer] is an actress brutalized and exploited by a misogynist film industry, and the Taiwanese director, Midi Z, never pulls his punches. Yet this startlingly evocative, complex and confrontational new film is not interested in justice or didacticism.” Read more…)

The Columnist (Netherlands, thriller/satire, Katja Herbers. Rotten Tomatoes: 80%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 58. From Beatric Loayza’s New York Times review: “A writer is thrown into the cyber snake pit when her op-ed criticizing Black Pete — a traditional Dutch Christmas character who typically appears in blackface — is published. Suddenly, swarms of disinhibited men inundate her Twitter account with death threats and misogynist nastiness. Oh, to be a woman online. In ‘The Columnist,’ a glossy and intentionally ridiculous psycho-thriller, the writer, Femke Boot [Katja Herbers], refuses to let the haters bring her down. She makes sure of that by becoming a literal troll hunter who spends her evenings stylishly executing unkempt dudes.” Read more…)

Trances (Morocco, 1981, music documentary, Nass El Ghiwane. From an unsigned 1985 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “Ahmed El-Maanouni’s ‘Transes,’ a French-Moroccan documentary, is about an immensely popular Moroccan musical group called Nass el-Ghiwane.The five-man combo, we are told, has had the same kind of electrifying effect on popular North African music in the 1970’s that the Beatles had on the popular music of Britain, Europe and America in the 60’s; thus the title ‘Transes,’ French for the trances of its audiences.” Read more…)

New Classic DVDs (pre-1960)
Lady In the Dark (1954, pioneering color TV musical with a book by Moss Hart, music by Kurt Weill, and lyrics by Ira Gershwin, Ann Sothern. From V.A.’s 1954 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “It was a wonderful show. Its professional touch from all directions stood out like Easter flowers in Rockefeller Plaza, and its taste was all but impeccable, with one or two minor exceptions. ‘Lady in the Dark’ was real theatre. It had vitality, it had mood and it had illusion—all the way from start to finish.” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Rocks In My Pockets (2014, animation, mental health, family history, Signe Baumane. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 78. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Nicolas Rapold’s 2014 Times review: “With ‘Rocks in My Pockets,’ Signe Baumane presents a sharp, surprising and funny animated feature, plumbing the depths of depression via her family history. Guided by Ms. Baumane’s almost musically accented voice-over, this hand-drawn debut feature is based upon the mental struggles of her Latvian grandmother and other relatives. It’s told with remorseless psychological intelligence, wicked irony and an acerbic sense of humor.” Read more…)

The Reason I Jump (autism, neuro-diversity, Naoki Higashida. Rotten Tomatoes: 98%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 83. From Ben Kenigsberg’s New York Times review: “In the book ‘The Reason I Jump,’ published in 2007, the author Naoki Higashida, who wrote it when he was 13, says he hopes to explain ‘what’s going on in the minds of people with autism.’ Higashida, a nonspeaking autistic person, structures the book as a Q. and A., answering questions like, ‘How are you writing these sentences?’ and ‘What are your thoughts on autism itself?’ The film adaptation, directed by Jerry Rothwell [the documentary about Greenpeace ‘How to Change the World’], is at once a supplement and an effort to find a cinematic analogue.” Read more…)

Some Kind of Heaven (The Villages, senior citizen life in USA. Rotten Tomatoes: 92%, Cerified Fresh. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Ben Kenigsberg’s Times review: “‘Some Kind of Heaven,’ a documentary co-produced by The New York Times, pierces the bubble of The Villages, a Florida retirement community northwest of Orlando that has grown to the size of a small city. The architecture and even the local lore foster an illusion of history. Rather than present a cross-section of this 30-square-mile golf-opolis, the director, Lance Oppenheim, making his first feature, focuses on three sets of characters.” Read more…)

Music: Glenn Roth mesmerizes on guitar on the Best Video deck Sat., May 15

Glenn Roth plays Best Video Film & Cultural Center’s deck Saturday, May 15. Glenn will play two 40-minute sets, starting at 5 PM.

The Best Video cafe will be open from and serving coffee drinks, beer, and wine.

Glenn Roth is not your typical commuter from Connecticut. Instead of a briefcase, he carries a gig bag. His workspace is the vaulted splendor of Grand Central Terminal or the tunnels and platforms of the New York City subway system. A literal underground sensation, Glenn is a licensed performer in the MTAs Music under New York program, playing for the most distracted and demanding audience in the world: legions of workers rushing to jobs throughout the Big Apple. And his fingers work magic, creating a soundscape of compelling melodies that invite them to leave the city rush behind on an aural escape.

Respect for social distancing, please, and masks mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking is available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

The Shellye Valauskas Experience, Jebb play the Best Video deck Fri., May 14

The Shellye Valauskas Experience plays a semi-unplugged show on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Fri., May 14, 2021. Jebb opens, starting at 5 PM.

Based in the New Haven area, Shellye Valauskas and Dean Falcone have been making music together for years. In addition to being Valauskas’ songwriting collaborator, bandmate & producer, Falcone has served the Connecticut music scene since the early ’80s with Jon Brion in The Excerpts, his own Dean and the Dragsters and a host of others. He has also worked on a national level collaborating with Norah Jones, Brian May (Queen), Aimee Mann, Lydia Loveless, Susannah Hoffs and Neko Case. Valauskas and Falcone’s shared love for the punchy pop of Crowded House, The Posies and Aimee Mann helped them nail a distinctive yet accessible radio-friendly sound from the start.

Valauskas and Falcone will be joined at this show by Brian Stevens (bass) and Rich Dart (percussion). The Shellye Valauskas Experience released their full-length LP “History of Panic” to rave reviews. Robert L. Ross at Popdose declared, “That’s the key thing – it satisfies on every level. The entire album. Listen to this and tell me you’re not instantly in love with it. It’s impossible to not be.”

Jebb is a 21 year old musician and writer, who has worked with Frankie Siragusa (The Posies), Terry Draper (Klaatu), Lisa Mychols & Tom Richards (The Six and Seven), Arthur Roberts (The Posies, Sushi Robo, and Peach). He is curently working on a song with Ken Stringfellow & Jon Auer of The Posies that will be on his upcoming studio album Can’t Wait for Yesterday being recorded at 10selden studio with Jef Wilson of Talent Craft.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks are mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Jazz by David Chevan & Warren Byrd on the Best Video deck Thurs., May 13

Jazz bassist David Chevan will be playing with pianist Warren Byrd outdoors on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Thurs., May 13, starting at 4:30 PM. They will probably play some standards, some originals, and some music from their group, The Afro-Semitic Experience.

Warren Byrd and David Chevan met at a Hartford jazz club and first started playing together in 1995. They played in various groups in jazz clubs all around Connecticut. Both open-minded musicians, they enjoyed interplay and communicating through improvisation. And so they began a friendship both on and off stage that has continued to this day. In 1997, they were invited to give a sermon in song at an MLK service at Congregation Mishkan Israel in Hamden. They added sacred music to their repertoire and began sharing their music in alternative performance spaces, namely houses of worship.

Since 1997, The Warren Byrd-David Chevan Duo and their group, The Afro-Semitic Experience, have given concerts across the United States in concert halls, churches, synagogues, schools and colleges. They have been featured artists at many festivals including the Detroit MusicFest, NY Noise Festival, the Washington D.C. Festival of Jewish Music, Greater Hartford Jazz Festival, the Paris Festival of Jewish Culture, and the International Festival of Arts and Ideas in New Haven. They have been featured in stories on NPR’s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon and Religion and Ethics Newsweekly on PBS.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks are mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking is available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Rescheduled: Robert Daniel Irwin plays the Best Video deck Wed., May 12

Robert Daniel Irwin plays the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Wednesday, May 12, starting at 5:30 PM. This show was rescheduled from Apr. 29 due to rain on that date.

Robert Daniel Irwin is a songwriter, singer, and guitarist from Hamden. Full of imagery, wordplay, and humor, his songs explore what it means to be human, and the strangeness of daily life in general. Rob will be releasing his second studio album in as many years, so come out and enjoy some new, original homegrown music!

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks are mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking is available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

New releases 5/4/21

Top Hits
Judas and the Black Messiah (historical drama, Daniel Kaluuya. Rotten Tomatoes: 96%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 85. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. Metacritic: 85. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “‘Judas and the Black Messiah’ represents a disciplined, impassioned effort to bring clarity to a volatile moment, to dispense with the sentimentality and revisionism that too often cloud movies about the ’60s and about the politics of race. It’s fascinating in its own right, and even more so when looked at alongside other recent movies.” Read more…)

The Little Things (thriller, Denzel Washington. Rotten Tomatoes: 48%. Metacritic: 54. From A.O. Scott’s New York Times review: “Written and directed by John Lee Hancock and starring Denzel Washington as a weary professional with keen instincts and a battered conscience, ‘The Little Things’ is an unapologetic throwback. It broods over the psychologically and spiritually damaging effects of police work as its two main detectives (Rami Malek alongside Washington) pursue an elusive, malignant murderer of women.” Read more…)

The Professor & The Madman (drama/biography, Sean Penn. Rotten Tomatoes: 41%. Metacritic: 27. From Jay Weissberg’s Variety review: “For those that have been anticipating this curious, much-delayed oddity, the good news is that Gibson is fine; it’s everything else that doesn’t work. Given that Gibson is refusing to do publicity (and doubtless neither will co-star Sean Penn), the film’s chances of attracting audiences seem minuscule. But at least the possibility finally exists. Only Safinia and his closest collaborators know just how much tinkering went on following his departure, but editing, alongside truly uninspired dialogue, are the picture’s biggest flaws.” Read more…)

Cowboys (drama, Steve Zahn. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 73. From Teo Bugbee’s New York Times review: “The conflicts at the heart of ‘Cowboys’ are timely, coming in a moment when trans children and their rights are at the forefront of American political debate. But the writer and director Anna Kerrigan doesn’t sensationalize her story. Her characters don’t speak as if they were addressing the audience from a pulpit.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
Judas and the Black Messiah

New Foreign
Moka (France, drama, Emmanuelle Devos. Rotten Tomatoes: 85%. Metacritic: 69. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “Something has to give, obviously, and the movie’s climax has sufficient twists and turns for a conventional payoff. But the movie, adapted from a novel by Tatiana de Rosnay, is ultimately more concerned with the genuinely tragic dimensions of the story than its suspense angles. That point is driven home with a final scene that is likely to move audience members to tears, just as it does Diane. ‘Moka’ is also a first-rate showcase for two of French cinema’s finest actors, Ms. Devos and Ms. Baye, both of whom do career-high work here.” Read more…)

The Day of the Beast (Spain, 1995, horror, Álex Angulo. Rotten Tomatoes: 75%. From Lawrence Van Gelder’s 1999 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “If Quentin Tarantino had gotten his directorial hands on ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ or ‘The Exorcist,’ the results might very well have resembled ‘The Day of the Beast.’ Part black comedy, part lurid cartoon, part paranoid theological melodrama with a heavy metal undercurrent, this subtitled Spanish film arrives today at Cinema Village trailing half a dozen Goyas, the Spanish equivalents of Oscars.” Read more…)

Viy (Russia, 1967, horror, Natalya Varley. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%.)

New British DVDs
Atlantic Crossing (historically-based mini-series, Kyle MacLahlan. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. Metacritic: 71. From Caroline Hallemann’s Town & Country review: “Inspired by the real-life experiences of the Norwegian royal family during the German occupation of their country in World War II, ‘Atlantic Crossing’ fictionalizes Crown Princess Märtha’s journey to safety in the U.S., and her influential relationship with President FDR. It’s that combination of royal history and political drama that really scratches the same itch as ‘The Crown.’ Plus, no major spoilers, but Queen Elizabeth’s parents even show up for a few episodes.” Read more…)

New American Back Catalog DVDs (post-1960)
The Reflecting Skin (1991, drama, Viggo Mortensen. Rotten Tomatoes: 88%. From Vincent Canby’s 1991 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “The film is the first to be written and directed by Mr. Ridley, the Englishman who wrote the screenplay for ‘The Krays.’ He seems to have a lot on his mind, though none of it is yet sorted out. He is reported to have said that he conceived ‘The Reflecting Skin’ at a period in his life when he was reading “Alice in Wonderland” and looking at a lot of paintings by Andrew Wyeth. You can make of that what you will.” Read more…)

The List of Adrian Messenger (1963, suspense, George C. Scott. Rotten Tomatoes: 67%. From Bosley Crowther’s 1963 New York Times review: “In ‘The List of Adrian Messenger,’ John Huston pulls a stunt that helps neither his reputation nor his plainly mediocre mystery film. He has some well-known Hollywood actors got up in disguises appear as assorted small characters in the picture without identifying them in the cast. Then, when the drama is over, he has them pull off their rubber masks and show themselves, with winks and simpers, as though they were clever, indeed. They aren’t.” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Hemingway (bio, writing, Ernest Hemingway. Rotten Tomatoes: 91%. Metacritic: 89. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From James Poniewozik’s Times review: “‘Hemingway’ doesn’t separate art and artist. Hemingway didn’t either. He created a public “avatar” that sometimes overshadowed his work [and threatened to make him a self-caricature] and wrote his life into his art [sometimes with cruelty toward friends and peers]. But the documentary also recognizes that life and art don’t always correlate neatly or simply. The resulting biography is clear-eyed about its subject but emotional about his legacy. “ Read more…)

M.C. Escher: Journey to Infinity (art, bio, dorm room posters, M.C. Escher. Rotten Tomatoes: 90%. Metacritic: 74. From Ben Kenigsberg’s New York Times review: “The film is strongest when it uses animation to illustrate Escher’s ideas, as when it unbends the curves of a lithograph to more clearly show what it depicts: a man in a gallery looking at a picture of the very scene he is in, a perspective repeated endlessly. We learn how Escher applied ideas from the mosaics at the Alhambra in Spain to imagery from the natural world. He describes the associative thinking — his mind jumping from a hexagon to a honeycomb to a bee — that inspired his subject matter and says he feels a kinship to Bach’s use of repetition and variation.” Read more…)

F.T.A. (antiwar activism, vaudeville, cultural politics, Vietnam war, Jane Fonda Rotten Tomatoes: 85%. Metacritic: 75. From J. Hoberman’s New York Times write-up of this movie’s re-release: “‘F.T.A.’, an agitprop rockumentary that ran for a week in July 1972, reappears as an exhumed relic, recording the joyfully scurrilous anti-Vietnam War vaudeville led by Jane Fonda that toured the towns outside American military bases in Hawaii, the Philippines and Japan. The movie, directed by Francine Parker, who produced it along with Fonda and Donald Sutherland, opened the same day that Fonda’s trip to North Vietnam made news. The film, greeted with outrage and consigned to oblivion, has been restored by IndieCollect, and is enjoying a belated second (virtual) run.” Read more…)

Anime/Animation
Death Note: The Complete Series (2006, anime, fantasy. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%.)

The 2021 Great Give® is May 4-5; advance giving has already started!

Great Give Happy Hour on our deck Tues., May 4

Save the dates! The Great Give® 2021 takes place from 8 AM, May 4, through 8 PM, May 5. (Advance giving began Apr. 23.) And we have two Great Give ®-associated Happy Hours from 5-7 PM on Tuesdays, Apr. 27 and May 4.

The Great Give®, a 36-hour fundraising marathon coordinated by the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, is a financial lifeline for hundreds of cultural and social action non-profits in the greater New Haven area. And BVFCC is no exception.

Last year, we raised some $50,000 in The Great Give®, almost doubling our previous best performance. (The Great Give® overall saw an outpouring of generosity in 2020.)

Those funds were crucial to sustaining us through the (still ongoing) lean pandemic months. They enabled us to:

• invest in a beautiful outdoor deck so we could present music shows safely last fall; the shows begin again in mid-April;

• help organize this past fall’s Hamden Black Film Mini-Series;

• and to continue to expand our renowned movie library.

Planning on supporting Best Video and like for your support to go even further? Please consider becoming one of our Best Video Great Give® “fundraisers.” There are thousands of dollars in additional prizes for the organizations with the most fundraisers raising $200 or more. Last year, BVFCC won $4,000 for second place in The Great Give®’s “You’ve Got Friends” prize by having over 60 fundraisers who brought in $200 or more. This year, we would like to get that number up to 100 fundraisers. Please contact us at info [AT] bestvideo.com for information on being one of our friendly fundraisers!

And please join us on our deck—paid for by the 2020 Great Give®—for Great Give® Happy Hours on Tuesday, May 4, from 5-7 PM each day! We will have half-price drinks, free snacks, and an opportunity to socialize (safely and outdoors) with fellow supporters of Best Video.

We look forward to continue to work on our mission of bringing people, film, and music together and it’s your support in The Great Give® that makes that possible.

The Bargain on the Best Video deck Sat., May 8, at 5 PM

The Bargain—a trio featuring Frank Critelli, Shandy Lawson, and Michael Rivers—play the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Saturday, May 8, starting at 5 PM.

A bargain was struck with the devil and each other to write, record, and perform the songs Frank Critelli, Muddy Rivers, and Shandy Lawson lasso while sitting around the kitchen table.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.


Click here for a complete list of upcoming events.

Seth Adam on the Best Video deck Fri., May 7, at 5 PM

Singer-songwriter Seth Adam plays a solo show on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Friday, May 7, starting at 5:00 PM.

A responsibly organized, socially distanced, outside event (weather permitting), featuring Seth’s catalog originals.

Singer/songwriter Seth Adam writes compelling, genuine songs with honest lyrics. The alt-country, Americana rocker draws comparisons to Counting Crows, Tom Petty, Ryan Adams, and Jason Isbell.

2016 was a turning point in his career as he wrote and recorded songs out of a hobbled together, home studio space. Playing all of the instruments, engineering, producing, and everything else-ing on his own resulted in an EP called East Rock. The experience inspired him to continue to do much of the same for the foreseeable future, foregoing using the formal recording studios. In January 2018, he released a single (and video) called ‘Anytown,’ written in response to the events in Charlottesville VA the summer before.

Currently, he is writing and recording songs for a full-length album as well as wrapping up an all-acoustic version of his 2007 release, Where You Come From, celebrating the 10 year anniversary of the original.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks are mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Click here for a complete list of upcoming events.

Katie & David play Irish music Thurs., May 6, at 5 PM

Katie & David play traditional Irish music on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Thurs., May 6, starting at 5 PM.

Born in London, England, to Irish parents, Katie Murray moved to Co. Mayo, Ireland, at age 10 and quickly immersed herself in the South Sligo music scene, which has highly influenced her style of fiddle playing. Following a number of years in Manchester, England, Katie moved to New Haven, Connecticut in 2015 where she works as Research Scientist. Katie can be regularly found playing in Irish music sessions throughout New England.

David Sasso is a multi-instrumentalist and composer who can be heard playing with folk/acoustic duo Kat Wallace and David Sasso and bluegrass group Five ‘n Change. A psychiatrist by day, he enjoys playing mandolin-family instruments in a variety of folk genres. He met Katie through the Irish traditional music scene in CT.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks are mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

For a complete list of upcoming events, click here.