Best Video Film & Cultural Center hosts Anniversary Open House & Fundraiser Sat., Nov. 16

On Saturday, November 16, 2019, Best Video Film & Cultural Center (BVFCC), celebrating its fourth anniversary as a nonprofit, will host its Fall Open House & “Fun”draising Extravaganza—a full day of festivity, pageantry, and fun for all ages. If you attended last year’s Open House, you know you’re in for a treat.

Everybody is welcome to come and enjoy what Best Video has to offer that day. It is our main fall fundraiser—our main spring fundraiser is the online Great Give in May—and we count on it. There is no set donation amount but we encourage all to contribute whatever they can—and/or become a Best Video Film & Cultural Center member—to keep BVFCC open and running.

There will be a table run by staff and Best Video Board members to meet you, sign up new members, renew memberships and receive donations.

BVFCC, has been running the former Best Video as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization since November, 2015. The organization’s mission is to “bring film, music and people together.” BVFCC curates an archive of over 30,000 titles assembled by original owner Hank Paper; presents regular music, film-related and literary events; and maintains a welcoming space for the community.

We invite you to our celebration on November 16. Please join us if you can, help put the “fun” in “fun”draiser! And remember, we love seeing you all each and every day. And each day in November is a day that you can donate. Come in and see us. Please help to make our fundraising efforts a success. You always have! We thank you wholeheartedly.

If you can’t make it on Saturday, you can still donate online and/or become a member online!

Schedule:

9 AM-Noon: Best Video Kids’ Music & Cartoon PJ Party

9:30 AM (or so) • Cartoons chosen by Best Video staffer Michael Wheatley & Dave Schmidt

10:30 AM • Music by Val McKee & Robert Messore

Noon • Prizes given out to winners of our second Student Art Show and display of all the entries

Noon-2 PM • The Caseus Cheese Truck at Best Video

1 PM • Open Mic for Kids 18 and younger

1-4 PM • Best Cookie Contest: Almost 20 bakers compete to see who bakes the “Best Cookie,” with two winners chosen by a poll of attendees! (Two great gift certificate prizes)

2 PM • Movie Trivia: BVFCC staffer Rob Harmon leads a 20-question preview of a new, in-the-works monthly trivia event ($50 BVFCC gift certificate prize)

3 PM • Music by The Blind Mice, a trio featuring members of the Hamden High School Jazz Combo.

4 PM (or so) • Short Films from 48 Hour Film Project New Haven

5-7 PM • Taqueria Cinco food truck at Best Video, free beer from Black Hog Brewing, Inc. (1 per attendee over 21 while supplies last)

5 PM • Rob Harmon’s “Secret Cinema”

5:30 (or so) • Short Films from 48 Hour Film Project New Haven

6 PM • Music by Bronson Rock (Rock/Soul/R&B)

7 PM (or so) • Short Films from 48 Hour Film Project New Haven

8:30 PM • Music by Thabisa (Afro-Soul)

 

Spring Glen School students present poetry slam at Best Video Wed., and Thurs., Nov. 20 & 21, 4:30-5:30 PM

Sixth grade students from Spring Glen Elementary will present a Poetry SLAM Wednesday and Thursday, Nov.  20 and 21, from 4:30-5:30 PM at Best Video Film & Cultural Center.

Organized by teacher Mary Nelson, students have written powerful poetry answering the question “What would you like to change in the world?” A dozen or so different poets will perform each afternoon.

*Note that content may not be appropriate for young children

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Mark Schenker continues “How to Read a Film” series on screwball comedies with “The Awful Truth” on Sun., Nov. 17, at 2 PM

In this ninth installment of his series “How to Read A Film,” Mark Schenker, Dean of Academic Affairs of Yale College, turns this time to screwball comedies. Like the gangster movie, the Western and the Hollywood musical, the genre of screwball comedy films originated in the United States. The new satirical spin (hence “screwball”) on romantic comedy stressed witty dialogue and zaniness over sentimental love, and placed big name stars in odd situations. As with gangster movies, horror films and lavish musicals, the genre found a ready audience with Depression-era filmgoers who were eager for escapist fare.

The second lecture with film in this series will be on Sun., Nov. 17. The series skips Nov. 24 and winds up on Dec. 1 and Dec. 8. Admission to each lecture is $7. The series continues on Nov. 17 with the 1937 movie “The Awful Truth.” (The series began with the 1934 “It Happened One Night” on Nov. 10.)

Schenker will consider three such films from the “classic” period of the genre, and then turn to a masterpiece of the form from the late 1950’s, when its heyday had passed. The remaining schedule:

Nov 17, 2 PM: The Awful Truth (1937)

Dec 1, 2 PM: Ball of Fire (1941)

Dec 8, 2 PM: Some Like It Hot (1959)

From Bosley Crowther’s 1937 New York Times review of “The Awful Truth”:

To be frank, “The Awful Truth” is awfully unimportant, but it is also one of the more laughable screen comedies of 1937, a fairly good vintage year. Its comedy is almost purely physical- like that of the old Avery Hopwood stage farces- with only here and there a lone gag to interrupt the pure poetry of motion, yet its unapologetic return to the fundamentals of comedy seems, we repeat, original and daring.

Its obvious success with a modern audience is also rather disquieting. Just when it began to appear that an excellent case had finally been made out for spoken wit and adultness of viewpoint on the screen, the mercurial Mr. McCarey, who only a few months ago saddened us to the point of tears with his “Make Way for Tomorrow,” shocks us with a comedy in which speech is subsidiary, and maturity exists only to be deflated into abject juvenility.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Mark Schenker launches next “How to Read a Film” series on great screwball comedies Sun., Nov. 10, at 2 PM

In this ninth installment of his series “How to Read A Film,” Mark Schenker, Dean of Academic Affairs of Yale College, turns this time to screwball comedies. Like the gangster movie, the Western and the Hollywood musical, the genre of screwball comedy films originated in the United States. The new satirical spin (hence “screwball”) on romantic comedy stressed witty dialogue and zaniness over sentimental love, and placed big name stars in odd situations. As with gangster movies, horror films and lavish musicals, the genre found a ready audience with Depression-era filmgoers who were eager for escapist fare.

All four lectures will be held on Sunday afternoons at 2 PM, starting on Sunday, Nov. 10. The second lecture will be on Sun., Nov. 17. The series skips Nov. 24 and winds up on Dec. 1 and Dec. 8. Admission to each lecture is $7. The series kicks off with the 1934 multiple Oscar-winning “It Happened One Night.”

Schenker will consider three such films from the “classic” period of the genre, and then turn to a masterpiece of the form from the late 1950’s, when its heyday had passed. The schedule:

Nov 10, 2 PM: It Happened One Night (1934)

Nov 17, 2 PM: The Awful Truth (1937)

Dec 1, 2 PM: Ball of Fire (1941)

Dec 8, 2 PM: Some Like It Hot (1959)

Roger Ebert’s capsule take on “It Happened One Night,” from 2009:

The surprise success of “It Happened One Night” made Frank Capra one of the screen’s top directors and provided the prototype for a decade of screwball comedies. Romantic comedies like “When Harry Met Sally…” and “The Sure Thing” draw on the rapid banter, outrageous comic situations and sexy road trip of “It Happened One Night.” The movie even provided inspiration for one of the screen’s most enduring characters, Bugs Bunny.

Mark Schenker’s lectures are accompanied by clips from the films to illustrate the points he is making. His previous lectures on the films of Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, and Billy Wilder (among others) and the historical context in which the TV series “Downton Abbey” took place were erudite and entertaining.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

 

Film Screening & Director Q&A: Best Video and NHDocs present “Shift Change: The Future of Community Policing” Mon., Nov. 4, at 7 PM

Best Video Film & Cultural Center and NHdocs: The New Haven Documentary Film Festival present a screening of Steve Hamm’s documentary film “Shift Change” on Monday, Nov. 4, at 7 PM. Admission is a suggested donation of $7.

“Shift Change: The Future of Community Policing” in New Haven documentary: at a time when the United States is sharply divided over the use of force by police, New Haven practices an approach called community policing. The goal is to foster trust and open communications, and to avoid excessive force. At its core, community policing is about attitude—police officers who have a public service mentality, who empathize with the people, and who exhaust all alternatives before making arrests and using force. There are lessons here for police—and the people—in cities all across the country.

Writer and director Steve Hamm will be on hand to discuss the making of the film and the issues it raises.

Children’s music: Robert Messore brings his Toddler Tunes to Best Video Sat., Nov. 2, 10:30 AM

Robert Messore brings his Toddler Tunes kids’ music show to Best Video Performance Space Saturday, Nov. 2. The event starts at 10:30 AM.

There’s a suggested donation of $5-10 per family but nobody will be turned away for lack of funds.

Robert Messore puts on a high-energy sing-and-dance-along program for young children and their parents. Voted “Best Entertainer for Toddlers” in the 2011 Kidhaven.com readers poll, Messore’s public “Toddler Tunes” program at St. John’s Episcopal Church in New Haven is the place to be every week! The songs are a mix of the classics and some newer songs that folks love. He recognizes that these programs are a place for parents to get together as much as anything, so he encourages folks with newborns through 6-yr-old children to attend.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Halloween Night at Best Video! 6-8:30 PM

Let Best Video Film & Cultural Center be your headquarters for Halloween Night!

We’ll be setting up in the front parking lot along with the Hamden Police Department to help you have a safe and fun night of Trick or Treating in Spring Glen. Popcorn, apple cider and donuts will be served as well as some family friendly spookiness on the TV. C’mon in with the kids or just hang out and have a coffee, beer or wine while little monsters haunt the neighborhood.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Sign up now for Best Cookie Contest, part of Best Video Film & Cultural Center’s Nov. 16 Anniversary Open House & Fundraising Extravaganza

On Saturday, November 16, 2019, Best Video Film and Cultural Center (BVFCC), celebrating its fourth anniversary, will host its BVFCC Anniversary Open House & Fundraising Extravaganza—a full day of festivity, pageantry, and fun for all ages. As part of that event, we will be hosting a Best Cookie Contest, set to occur from 1-4 PM.

Up to 16 bakers will be competing for the Best Cookie. If you want to be one of the bakers, send an email with the subject “Cookie” to bvfcc [at] bestvideo.com. Include your name, phone and type of cookie. The first 16 bakers to email us to sign up will be part of the contest. You will be emailed with full details once you sign up.

Want to be a taster? There’s no need to sign up—just come to Best Video Film & Cultural Center’s Sat., Nov. 16, Open House & Fundraiser, get a ballot for $2, and vote for your favorite cookies.

We have some great prizes for the winners. Any kind of cookie is welcome!

This year’s Best Video student art contest announced, submissions due Mon., Nov. 4

Best Video Film & Cultural Center (BVFCC) announces a student art contest as part of the celebration of its fourth anniversary as a nonprofit organization and in conjunction with its Anniversary Open House & Fundraising Extravaganza, which takes place Saturday, Nov. 16, from 9 AM-9 PM. Winners in four age categories—Kindergarten to 3rd grade, 4th through 6th grade, 7th through 8th grade and grades 9-12—will receive a $100 prize.

The deadline for submitting artwork is 6 PM, Monday, Nov. 4, 2019.

All submissions must be on 8 ½”x11″ paper and deal with either a movie- or music-related theme. They can be in color or black and white. They can be drawings, paintings, collage or any other flat, two-dimensional medium.

Prizes will be $100 in each age category. The Grand Prize winner will be published as the centerfold of BVFCC’s Open House program book. The other three winners will also appear in the book.

The rest of the submissions will be on display at the gala on November 16. Originals will be on display if space is available. If there is not enough space, the submissions will be displayed via video.

BVFCC has been running the former Best Video as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization since November, 2015. The organization’s mission is to “bring film, music and people together.”

Second Wednesday Open Mic takes place Wed., Oct. 9, at 7 PM

Musicians! Comedians! Poets! Magicians! Spoken word artists! The Second Wednesday Open Mic takes place Wednesday, Oct. 9, starting at 7 PM. Admission is a Suggested Donation of $3-5 to support BVFCC. Poet Karen Ponzio (aka KP The Word) — who writes for the New Haven Independent and has a show on Cygnus RADIO — is the host for this show.

The sign-up sheet will be put out at 6:45 PM in order for prospective performers who haven’t been able to get here earlier to have a chance at performing slots. No sign-ups will be taken before 6:45.

Each slot is 10 minutes or two songs (whichever is shorter) with a 5-minute break between each performer. We have a total of 10 slots from 7-9:30 PM if people use their maximum time. We will play it by ear after that with any “extra” performers getting time as available in order of signing the sheet. While 9:30 PM is the official cut-off time, we may at our discretion continue with performers up to 10 PM.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.