New releases 7/1/14

Top Hits
The Unknown Known (documentary, recent history, politics, Donald Rumsfeld. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. Metacritic: 69. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “And The Unknown Known, which draws its title from one of Mr. Rumsfeld’s most famous rhetorical flights, is very much a battle of wits and words. Yes, it is a probing and unsettling inquiry into the recent political and military history of the United States, but it is also a bracing and invigorating philosophical skirmish. The tension between those two registers — between hard facts about state violence and devilish abstractions about causes and consequences — is what gives the film some of its energy and suspense. It is clear enough that an ideological chasm separates the unseen interviewer from his crisply dressed subject, but the real drama between them arises from a clash of epistemologies.” Read more…)

This Is Martin Bonner (drama, Paul Eenhoorn. Rotten Tomatoes: 93%. Metacritic: 71.From Nicolas Rapold’s New York Times review: “In Chad Hartigan’s resolutely low-key film, the Martin of the title, a fresh transplant from the East, is starting over as an outreach counselor at a Reno, Nev., penitentiary after a crisis of belief. He meets Travis, who is newly sprung after years in prison, and takes him under his wing. The slightly bewildered new ex-con sees freedom stretched out before him and immediately worries that he’ll blow his chances.” Read more…)

Afflicted (fantasy/horror, Derek Lee. Rotten Tomatoes: 79%. Metacritic: 56.)
Whoopi: Back to Broadway (stand-up comedy, Whoopi Goldberg)

New TV
Helix: Season 1 (sci-fi/thriller series, Billy Campbell. Rotten Tomatoes: 81%. Metacritic: 68.)

New Documentaries
The Unknown Known (recent history, politics, war, Donald Rumsfeld, in Top Hits. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. Metacritic: 69. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From A.O. Scott’s Times review: “And The Unknown Known, which draws its title from one of Mr. Rumsfeld’s most famous rhetorical flights, is very much a battle of wits and words. Yes, it is a probing and unsettling inquiry into the recent political and military history of the United States, but it is also a bracing and invigorating philosophical skirmish. The tension between those two registers — between hard facts about state violence and devilish abstractions about causes and consequences — is what gives the film some of its energy and suspense. It is clear enough that an ideological chasm separates the unseen interviewer from his crisply dressed subject, but the real drama between them arises from a clash of epistemologies.” Read more…)