Film Screening: Director Alice Millar presents her “Summer in the Shade” Mon., Mar 9, at 7 PM

Best Video Film & Cultural Center presents a special screening of the unreleased independent movie “Summer in the Shade” on Monday, Mar. 9, at 7 PM. NYC-based Director Alice Millar will be on hand for a Q&A as will BVFCC members Gabrielle Muller and David Lackner, who were responsible for illustrations used in the film and the music score, respectively.

Synopsis:

Summer, 1997. Twelve-year-old Grace and eleven-year-old Asta have been friends for as long as they can remember. When her father suddenly leaves, Grace’s fascination with religion and the supernatural becomes an obsession. At the end of the school holidays, the girls go to stay in a cottage in the Cornish countryside with Asta’s bohemian mum, Kate. There, troubled Grace is forced to confront her demons.

From Alice Millar’s director’s statement:

“Summer in the Shade” is a psychological thriller about the terror experienced by a girl as she transitions from a child to a woman. Set in 1997 on a summer vacation in Cornwall, we follow troubled Grace and her best friend Asta as they explore the ancient forests and their changing bodies…

What unfolds is an exploration into the trauma of puberty and the experience of self-disgust experienced by most women as they deal with changing from a little girl to a sexualized being. Universally this is a diffcult time and for many, is accompanied by deep psychological fear and existential revulsion. The body swells and starts to bleed. Often, men look at you with hunger rather than affection and women with jealousy rather than protection in their eyes.

In the vivid imagination of our protagonist Grace, who is also dealing with her father abandoning her family for the cliché of a younger woman, these themes lead her to see religion as a comfort. However, the religion she finds merely reinforces a sense of shame and guilt, as well as igniting fears of supernatural and biblical terrors, demons, original sin and the concept of participating in evil.

Award-winning Alice Florence Millar is a filmmaker from London, England based in New York City. She is a graduate of NYU’s Gallatin School where she created the individualized degree ‘Mesmerizing the Masses.’ Millar has worked as a Director of Photography for six years, shooting in the Americas, the United Kingdom, France, Bangladesh and Thailand. She is best known for her handheld camera style, which is fluid and meditative; her images oscillate between naturalism and highly constructed surrealism. Millar is attached to four independent features about to be released, including a co-direction on psychological thriller Attendant. Her directorial work focuses on women, violence and identity. Millar will make her feature length directorial debut with Summer in the Shade, a dark mystery about puberty inspired by her childhood holidays in seaside Cornwall.

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Secret Cinema—hosted by Rob Harmon—screens a double feature Sat., Mar. 7, at 7 PM

Best Video Film & Cultural Center staffer Rob Harmon hosts a semi-regular cult film series under the rubric “Secret Cinema.” The next Secret Cinema takes place Saturday, Mar. 7, at 7 PM. Along with the night’s movie, Rob shows relevant film trailers and cranks up the Best Video popcorn machine for cinema-appropriate snacking.​

For this edition of Secret Cinema, Rob hosts a double feature.

Secret Cinema is free but donations to support Best Video Film & Cultural Center and its programming are always welcome. For more info (including what the movie titles are), call BVFCC at (203) 287-9286 or email Rob at secretcinemact@gmail.com.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Secret Cinema, hosted by Rob Harmon, screens a secret movie Mon., Feb. 24

Best Video Film & Cultural Center staffer Rob Harmon hosts a semi-regular cult film series under the rubric “Secret Cinema.” The next Secret Cinema takes place Monday, Feb. 24, at 8 PM. Along with the night’s movie, Rob shows relevant film trailers and cranks up the Best Video popcorn machine for cinema-appropriate snacking.​

Secret Cinema is free but donations to support Best Video Film & Cultural Center and its programming are always welcome. For more info, call BVFCC at (203) 287-9286 or email Rob at secretcinemact@gmail.com.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Film screening: “Greenfingers” launches second annual 3-film “Garden In Film” garden-themed series Sun., Feb. 23, at 3 PM

Reprising a series concept from 2019, Best Video Film & Cultural Center member and master gardener Eric Larson (formerly head of Marsh Botanical Gardens at Yale) presents “Garden In Film,” a series of three garden-themed movies, starting on Sunday, Feb. 23, and continuing on alternate Sundays (Mar. 8 and Mar. 22). Admission for each screening is $7.

The series plants the seed on Sunday, Feb. 23, at 3 PM with 2000’s “Greenfingers,” starring Clive Owen and Helen Mirren. Seedlings break the earth on Sunday, Mar. 8, at 3 PM with “Tulip Fever” from 2017, starring Alicia Vikander. The final harvest occurs on Sunday, Mar. 23, at 3 PM with the screening of Hal Ashby’s “Being There” (1979), starring Peter Sellers.

Starring Clive Owen and Helen Mirren, Green Fingers tells the tale of a group in a minimum security facility in England who discover the joys of gardening as therapy, physical improvement and perhaps leading to a spot in the world famous Chelsea Flower Show. Based on a true story (aren’t all movies these days?) Green Fingers will help us swing into the gardening season with verve, elan and the added bonus of appreciating that we are not locked up in prison.

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Film screening: Rob Harmon’s Secret Cinema takes place Mon., Feb. 10, at 8 PM

Best Video Film & Cultural Center staffer Rob Harmon hosts a semi-regular cult film series under the rubric “Secret Cinema.” The next Secret Cinema takes place Monday, Feb. 10, at 8 PM. Along with the night’s movie, Rob shows relevant film trailers and cranks up the Best Video popcorn machine for cinema-appropriate snacking.​

Secret Cinema is free but donations to support Best Video Film & Cultural Center and its programming are always welcome. For more info, including what the movie is, call BVFCC or email Rob at secretcinemact@gmail.com.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Film Screening: Rob Harmon hosts Secret Cinema Mon., Jan. 13, at 8 PM

Best Video Film & Cultural Center staffer Rob Harmon hosts a semi-regular cult film series under the rubric “Secret Cinema.” The next Secret Cinema takes place Monday, Jan. 13, at 8 PM. Along with the night’s movie, Rob shows relevant film trailers and cranks up the Best Video popcorn machine for cinema-appropriate snacking.​

Secret Cinema is free but donations to support Best Video Film & Cultural Center and its programming are always welcome. For more info and the name of the film, email Rob at secretcinemact@gmail.com or call at (203) 287-9286.

Film Screening: Hamden Tree Commission presents “Call of the Forest” Sun., Jan. 12, at 3 PM

The Hamden Tree Commission and the Town of Hamden present a screening of “Call of the Forest: The Forgotten Wisdom of Trees” at Best Video Film & Cultural Center on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020. The screening is at 3 PM and is free and open to the public.

Take a walk in the woods with beloved Irish-Canadian scientist and author, Diana Beresford-Kroeger, as she reveals our profound human connection to the ancient & sacred northern forests and the essential role that they play in sustaining the health of our planet.

We cut down billions of trees every year – Today only five percent of the world’s old growth forests remain intact. Yet trees are one of this planet’s most significant creators of food, new medicines, and oxygen. Forests hold the answer to many of the world’s problems; from climate change to human health and well-being. Visionary scientist and acclaimed author Diana Beresford-Kroeger explores the science, folklore, and history of this essential eco-system reminding us that when we improve our profound human connection to woodlands we can, not only, restore our health – we can restore our planet.

From the sacred sugi and cedar forests of Japan, the ancient Raheen Wood of Ireland, and the walnut and redwood trees of America, to the great boreal forest of Canada, Call of the Forest tells the amazing stories behind the history and legacy of these ancient forests while also explaining the science of trees and the irreplaceable roles they play in protecting and feeding the planet.

Along the way Diana meets people who are taking the lead to replant, restore and protect the last of these great ancient species forests. We meet Dr. Akira Miyawaki, a worldwide specialist in the restoration of natural forest systems on degraded land, who shows us how a native forest system can be planted in the smallest street corner of Tokyo. Dr. Bill Libby, a pioneer in the field of forest tree genetics, tells us about the impacts of climate change on California’s coast redwood and giant sequoia. Since 2002 Andrew St. Ledger, founder of The Woodland League in Ireland, has dedicated his life to restoring native woodlands in Ireland. His work restoring the great forest of Aughty shows us all how old growth forests can be replanted and offers a glimpse into our cultural history with trees.

Woodlands are the beating heart of our ecosystem and Diana’s call to action – to protect the native forests of the world and for every person to plant one tree a year for the next six years – provides us with a simple and powerful solution for climate change. As she travels across the globe to tell the story of the life and the science of the global forest, she presents us with a revolutionary conception of their value to all life and a message that could, literally, save mankind from itself.

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Film Screening and Q&A: Stephen Dest’s “I Am Shakespeare: The Henry Green Story” Mon., Nov. 11, at 7 PM

Filmmaker Stephen Dest screens his documentary “I Am Shakespeare: The Henry Green Story” at Best Video Performance Space on Monday, Nov. 11, at 7 PM. Admission is $7.

Join us for a viewing of one of the most talked about documentaries of the year. Filmmaker, Stephen Dest will have just returned from New Orleans where he screened the film at the 2019 Grantmakers for Education Conference. I’m sure he’ll have plenty to say as he continues his journey to bring Henry’s incredible story to a schools nationwide.

Stephen Dest’s documentary “I AM SHAKESPEARE: The Henry Green Story” chronicles the true life story of 19 year old, Henry Green, living a dual life as a brilliant young actor and inner-city gang member, who was brutally shot and left for dead just shortly after his inspiring performance in Shakespeare’s “Romeo & Juliet” and his remarkable (less than 1% chance of survival) recovery/intestinal transplant received by a 13 year old boy (Jack) who was killed in a car accident on the other side of the country but who still managed to save Henry’s life.

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Film screening: “The Village,” about Wooster Square Italian community, screens Tues., May 7, at 7:30 PM

Best Video Film & Cultural Center screens “The Village: Life in New Haven’s Little Italy” on Tuesday, May 7. The screening starts at 7:30 PM and admission is $7.

“The Village: Life in New Haven’s Little Italy,” tells the story of the city’s Wooster Square neighborhood, which for many years was a tight-knit Italian-American enclave. Using oral history interviews, photos from family albums, and historic films and photographs, the documentary explores the power of ethnic identity and reaffirms the importance of immigration to American society.

Today, few descendants of the immigrants still live in Wooster Square, but vestiges of their community remain—in the church, the ethnic societies and their festas, and the pizza joints and pastry shops. Most vividly, the village lives on in the fond memories of the people who grew up there.

“The Village,” directed by Steve Hamm, has been playing to packed houses in the greater New Haven area. Hamm, film editor Scott Amore and longtime Wooster Square resident Frank Carrano—who is featured in the film—will be on hand for a discussion after the one-hour showing.

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Film screening: Hamden Land Conservation Trust presents “Journey of the Universe” Tues., Apr. 2, at 6:30 PM

Join the Hamden Land Conservation Trust on Tuesday, Apr. 2, at 6:30 pm at Best Video located at 1842 Whitney Avenue for a viewing of the film “Journey of the Universe,” a remarkable film that draws together scientific discoveries in astronomy, geology, and biology with humanistic insights concerning the nature of the universe.

Yale professors and producers of the film Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim will offer their insights afterward. Viewers are sure to walk away moved and inspired.

“Journey of the Universe” narrates the 14-billion year story of the universe’s development, from the great flaring forth at the universe’s inception to the emergence of simple molecules and atoms to the evolution of galaxies, stars, solar systems, and planetary life of greater complexity and consciousness. This is a story that inspires wonder as we begin to understand such complexity through science and appreciate such beauty through poetry, art, history, religion, and philosophy. It also awakens us to the dynamic processes of evolution that are chaotic and destructive, as well as creative and life-generating.

The film is narrated by evolutionary philosopher Brian Swimme, and was produced by Yale historian of religions Mary Evelyn Tucker and her husband, John Grim. Tucker and Grim teach in a joint master’s program in religion and ecology at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (FES) and Yale Divinity School, where they also direct the Forum on Religion and Ecology.

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