Music: Anna Ayres-Brown to perform her songs on Wed., June 12, at 8 PM

Singer-songwriter Anna Ayres-Brown will perform in the Best Video Performance space on Wednesday, June 12. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover charge is $5.

Anna Ayres-Brown is a 15 year-old sophomore from New Haven, CT. She attends Hopkins School. She began writing songs on the guitar at a young age and has continued with her interest in songwriting. She is in an all-female a cappella group from Hopkins, “Triple Trio”. She is also an avid member of the Drama Association at her school.

Ayres-Brown performed in the Performance Space last December—her first concert outside her school as a solo artist—and wowed the audience both with her poise on stage and with the sophistication of her compositions.

Watch Anna perform her song “Stay Awhile” in the Best Video Performance Space last December:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, June 5. PUNK/BLUES: SPACE ORPHANS

• Thursday, June 6. INDIE ROCK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, June 10. FILM SCREENING: “SAVING HUBBLE”

• Wednesday, June 12. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ANNA AYRES-BROWN

• Thursday, June 13. INDIE ROCK: THE MOUNTAIN MOVERS

• Wednesday, June 19. CABARET: RICH MORAN

• Thursday, June 20. INDIE POP: THE FURORS, AL HOWARD

• Wednesday, June 26. INDIE ROCK: THE JELLYSHIRTS

• Thursday, June 27. SINGER-SONGWRITERS: FRANK CRITELLI, MARK MIRANDO

• Wednesday, July 10. ACOUSTIC FOLK: SHELDON CAMPBELL

• Thursday, July 11. ACOUSTIC ROCK: JAMES VELVET & THE LONESOME SPARROWS

• Wednesday, July 18. CLASSICAL GUITAR: ORPHÉE RUSSELL

Film screening: “Saving Hubble” on Mon., June 10, at 7:30 PM

Saving_Hubble_poster72dpiDirector David Gaynes will screen and discuss his documentary “Saving Hubble” at the Best Video Performance Space on Monday, June 10, starting at 7:30 PM.  Admission for this screening is $5.

The film is about the successful effort to save and repair the space telescope and how that complex piece of equipment connects humans to the wider universe. Gaynes has been showing the film as part of his “Hubble Roadshow,” events that often include panel discussions about related issues and—weather conditions permitting—post-screening star viewing through the telescopes of amateur astronomers.

David Gaynes is a documentary filmmaker and cameraman. “Saving Hubble” tells the story of the fight to keep the Hubble Space Telescope alive during a complicated period in NASA (and American) history. David is drawing world-wide attention for “Saving Hubble”‘s grassroots, ad-hoc distribution campaign, affectionately titled the Hubble Roadshow. He is also finishing a new documentary feature about a pilgrimage to Israel taken by a group of nursing home residents, currently titled “Next Year in Jerusalem.” David was the cinematographer of the recent award-winning documentary feature “All Me: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert” (Dir. Vivian Ducat). In 2005, he won multiple festival awards for his debut documentary feature “Keeper of the Kohn,” which explored the life and challenges of Peter Kohn, the 70-year old waterboy of the Middlebury College Lacrosse Team. David lives in New York City, making a living on a mix of income from film projects and freelance camera and directorial work.

From a 2012 review of “Saving Hubble” by Jeff Foust for The Space Review:

One of the more remarkable grassroots space advocacy efforts of the last decade was the public response to NASA’s plans in 2004 to cancel the final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. The overwhelmingly negative reaction to that decision transcended the usual narrow communities of space activists into the general public, overshadowing the debate about the future of NASA’s human spaceflight plans—the Vision for Space Exploration—that was taking place at the same time. Those lobbying efforts paid off: in 2006 NASA reversed its earlier decision, electing to carrying out the servicing mission, which the STS-125 shuttle crew carried out successfully in May 2009.

“Saving Hubble” does provide some history about the telescope, charting the highs and lows, such as the reaction to its optical aberration discovered shortly after launch to the successful repairs of the telescope and the imagery it’s produced. The bulk of the film, though, is about the decision by then-NASA administrator Sean O’Keefe to cancel the final Hubble servicing mission, and the reaction by both astronomers and the public. The film features interviews with some of the scientists and engineers involved with Hubble and journalists who covered it, but it also includes a broad cross-section of the public as well, talking about Hubble and what it means to them. Gaynes casts a wide net here, from a gregarious taxicab driver in Nashville to high school athletes and cheerleaders in Kansas to even the commercial spaceflight pioneers working at Mojave Air and Space Port in California.

View the trailer for “Saving Hubble”:

Music: Elison Jackson to play alt-country/indie rock Thurs., June 6, at 8 PM

Elison_Jackson_WebThe band Elison Jackson play the Best Video Performance Space on Thursday, June 6. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

Elison Jackson is a stoner-soul/garage-folk band from New Haven, CT. Their latest release, “I Do Believe She Flew Out the Drainpipe,” drew critical acclaim in regional press and blogosphere.  They’ve toured east of the Mississippi extensively for the past year and a half, and have shared the stage with Akron/Family, The Music Tapes, The Sadies, Those Darlins, and more.  They plan to release their new full length this summer.

Reviewing “I Do Believe She Flew Out the Drainpipe” on CT.com, Chip McCabe wrote, “Fans of Leonard Cohen, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Velvet Underground, The Byrds, Syd Barrett, and especially The Animals will rejoice over the authenticity and awesomeness of this album.”

CT’s Elison Jackson has been on my personal radar for awhile now.  I was blown away by last year’s full length effort, Spectral Evidence, and had big hopes for any new recorded material.  My expectations have been exceeded.  Their new EP, “I Do Believe She Flew Out the Drain Pipe” (released on New London’s  The Telegraph Recording Company imprint) is hands down one of the best things you’ll hear out of the CT music scene this year.

Elison Jackson has always had this sort of ethereal , ghostly quality to the brand of folk rock they peddle.  However on this release they’ve taken their sound to new dark and secret places that it hasn’t ventured as of yet.  Songs like “Burned” and “Parking Lot” feel a little dangerous, the latter especially with its haunting backing vocals and nasty guitar work.  There are moments on this EP where I feel like I’m suddenly launched into a David Lynch film even if only for a brief moment and that’s not a bad thing at all.

Check out this live performance by Elison Jackson on the “Live & Local” show:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, May 29. No Event.

•Thursday, May 30. ACOUSTIC FOLK: ROBERT MESSORE

• Wednesday, June 5. PUNK/BLUES: SPACE ORPHANS

• Thursday, June 6. INDIE ROCK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, June 10. FILM SCREENING: “SAVING HUBBLE”

• Wednesday, June 12. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ANNA AYRES-BROWN

• Thursday, June 13. INDIE ROCK: THE MOUNTAIN MOVERS

• Wednesday, June 19. CABARET: RICH MORAN

• Thursday, June 20. INDIE POP: THE FURORS, AL HOWARD

• Wednesday, June 26. INDIE ROCK: THE JELLYSHIRTS

• Thursday, June 27. SINGER-SONGWRITERS: FRANK CRITELLI, MARK MIRANDO

• Wednesday, July 10. ACOUSTIC FOLK: SHELDON CAMPBELL

• Thursday, July 11. ACOUSTIC ROCK: JAMES VELVET & THE LONESOME SPARROWS

Music: Space Orphans to play blues-influenced punk Wed., June 5, at 8 PM

Space_Orphans_WebSpace Orphans play the Best Video Performance Space on Wednesday, June 5. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

Ex-Kimono Draggin’ alumni re-formed as Space Orphans after recruiting a new bass player and adding a keyboardist. Their sound is built upon a thick foundation of scratchy guitars, weighty drums, relentlessly shifting rhythms and rowdy animated vocals. The arrangement adds a blanket layer of cosmic essence, worthy of their name, while the musical structures are focused, finely tuned and surprisingly melodic.

Influences include Pink Floyd, Bowie, Velvet Underground, Mothers of Invention, King Crimson, Big Black, T. Rex, Gentle Giant, My Bloody Valentine, Minutemen, Hüsker Dü, Black Sabbath, etc.

Band members are Joe Nolan (Guitar, Vocals), Kelly L’Heureux (Bass), Frank Malec (Keyboards) and Chris Swirski (Drums).

Space Orphans playing one side of their recent 7″ 45 record live in Hartford:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, May 29. No Event.

•Thursday, May 30. ACOUSTIC FOLK: ROBERT MESSORE

• Wednesday, June 5. PUNK/BLUES: SPACE ORPHANS

• Thursday, June 6. INDIE ROCK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, June 10. FILM SCREENING: “SAVING HUBBLE”

• Wednesday, June 12. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ANNA AYRES-BROWN

• Thursday, June 13. INDIE ROCK: THE MOUNTAIN MOVERS

• Wednesday, June 19. CABARET: RICH MORAN

• Thursday, June 20. INDIE POP: THE FURORS, AL HOWARD

• Wednesday, June 26. INDIE ROCK: THE JELLYSHIRTS

• Thursday, June 27. SINGER-SONGWRITERS: FRANK CRITELLI, MARK MIRANDO

• Wednesday, July 10. ACOUSTIC FOLK: SHELDON CAMPBELL

• Thursday, July 11. ACOUSTIC ROCK: JAMES VELVET & THE LONESOME SPARROWS

Film on the Hubble Space Telescope to be screened Mon., June 10

Director David Gaynes will screen and discuss his documentary “Saving Hubble” at the Best Video Performance Space on Monday, June 10, starting at 7:30 PM.  The film is about the successful effort to save and repair the space telescope and how that complex piece of equipment connects humans to the wider universe. Gaynes has been showing the film as part of his “Hubble Roadshow,” events that often include panel discussions about related issues and—weather conditions permitting—post-screening star viewing through the telescopes of amateur astronomers.

We will post more information about this event closer to the date. In the meantime, view the trailer for “Saving Hubble”: