Rob Harmon’s recommendation 11/26/13

ROB HARMON’S PICKS 11/26/13

Rob_Harmon_image_for_picksIT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE…AT BEST VIDEO!

…So my pick this week is… everything at Best Video.

“Wait,” you may say, “Isn’t that a bit broad? Shouldn’t this column be about recommending specific titles?””

Allow me to explain.

On a recent Sunday night, my mind naturally began to wander as I straightened out the shelves and put away movies. Perhaps it was the late hour or the quiet before the impending holiday season but I found myself wondering – as in that beloved Frank Capra-directed classic of small-town resilience IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE –  “What would a world without Best Video look like?”

I imagined such a frightening scenario: Nothing in Hamden and the Greater New Haven area but forgettable and *blah* movies available to stream online, or watch on demand or—as far as rental goes—only that coldly glowing red vending machine dispensing inane entertainment in the dead of night. It was an eerie landscape, a veritable ghost town for movies. Where would one go to speak to an accomplished staff—or anyone human, for that matter!—about recommendations or help in tracking down rare or hard-to-find movies? Where, indeed, would the community gathering place be if not at its locally-owned video store?

The thought made me shudder and brought me shooting back to reality. I see the looks of wonder on the faces of children as they enter Best Video: many have never been inside a video store before and they roam about with their mouths agape. I remember the sense of wonder myself and I still feel it, even after working here for three-and-a-half years. We are, indeed, lucky to have this resource in our community.

The Christmas season is upon us and Best Video needs your support now more than at any other time during the year. As you go about your holiday shopping please remember the brick-and-mortar store with its 50,000 thousand titles which has been an anchor here in the Spring Glen neighborhood since first opening its doors in 1985 with a simple premise: to rent and sell the movies that we love to our customers who are precisely in the mood or need for them. Remember that dollars spent here in Hamden stay in Hamden and aid our continuing development as both a community cultural center and a neighborhood crossroads.

Remember that Best Video is the last remaining video store in the New Haven, for many a continued survival in today’s media climate against the non-personal, non-interactive trends of the day. Remember that—like the Bailey Building & Loan of It’s a Wonderful Life—Best Video is your last line of defense, against a world of Redboxes and red Netflix envelopes and log-in screens. Remember the impact that this one store has had in the life of this community: like George Bailey, who stood by his hometown and fought the “Battle of Bedford Falls,” Best Video’s owner Hank Paper and its two managers, Richard Brown and Hank Hoffman, have similarly fought the “Battle of Hamden, CT,” staying true to the store’s original mission while remaining relevant by adding a café and wine bar and a performance space in recent years.

And, yet, all of this does not come free: we need your business this holiday season; we need it as never before! Here is how you can help:

• RENT — This is the easiest and most fundamental way in which you can help Best Video! Do you have lists of “movies to watch” tucked away somewhere? Thinking of a holiday movie marathon? Best Video is your one-stop destination! With the cold weather here again what could be better than an armload of movies or TV shows to snuggle up with?

• BUY — In addition to the movies, TV shows, and assorted box sets on DVD and Blu-ray—both new and used—which we have available for sale we are capable of ordering thousands more titles besides, including CDs, for your purchase, which are here at the store in just a matter of days. Our prices are competitive: 10% off of list price and 20% off of titles pre-ordered before street date, and our turnaround for special orders is swift – just a day or two. Why do your holiday shopping anywhere else when you can do it here at Best Video? And, if you have no idea what to get that certain movie lover on your list there is the ever-reliable Best Video gift certificate!

• EAT and DRINK at our café and wine bar — We have an excellent variety of coffees, teas, hot chocolate, bagels, muffins, scones, as well as holiday-themed drinks and treats to start your day and keep it going strong; and, after a hectic day of shopping and visiting, we have our peerless selection of beers and wines to enjoy with family and friends!

• ATTEND A PERFORMANCE in our performance space — We have hosted a wide variety of events since the inception of our performance space, everything from rock music to jazz to classical, from movie screenings with moderated Q&A’s to wine tastings and poetry readings. The performance space and café —with its intimate atmosphere, PA system, and large projection screen—is even available for rental for your holiday party, book club meeting, art reception, PowerPoint seminar, or other events!

• DONATE your used DVDs for us to sell!

• SPREAD THE WORD about Best Video to anyone and everyone you know – We started out 28 years ago as a neighborhood store and we are still a neighborhood store today!

Many customers express gratitude to us for still being here and—trust me—we are glad to be here, too! But what better way could there be to show your thanks than with your business this holiday season?

So, for this week only….

Recommended: Everything, every damn movie in the store – from AMOUR and ARGO to ZARDOZ and ZORBA THE GREEK, from ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST and 2 GUNS to THE 5,000 FINGERS OF DR. T and MILLION DOLLAR BABY, and from FIRST BLOOD to THE LAST EMPEROR!

Let’s ensure that this is a great holiday season and that Best Video is here for many more to come! Happy Thanksgiving and thank you, thank you, thank you from the bottom of our hearts for your continued support throughout the years: we truly would not be here without you!

“You see, George, you really had a wonderful life. Don’t you see what a mistake it would be to throw it away?” – It’s a Wonderful Life

Rob Harmon’s recommendations 11/19/13

ROB HARMON’S PICKS 11/19/13

Rob_Harmon_image_for_picksBARBARA (dir. Christian Petzold, 2012)

The impressive new German political thriller BARBARA depicts life in the former German Democratic Republic (or East Germany), but, whereas most films paint a picture of the Soviet Bloc countries in terms of black-and-white, director Christian Petzold wisely chooses to focus on the bleak and dehumanizing ephemera of everyday life—such as busted wall sockets and a strictly-monitored bathing schedule—and the pure dug-in determination of its inhabitants to survive. This is a landscape—seemingly sparse and quiet—populated by survivors, spiritually wounded and maimed though they may be; where the West is such a capricious wonderland far, far away that two hushed women can stare transfixedly at the pages of a garish, smuggled-in jewelry catalogue; and where even villains—especially villains—have human sides: this society may be air-tight but it is far from airless, permitting some room to breathe.

The story takes place in 1980, a year in which much of the GDR was transfixed upon the Olympic Summer Games in Moscow. Dr. Barbara Wolff (veteran actress Nina Hoss) arrives in the provinces to take up a post at a small pediatric hospital. As it turns out this humble position is a far cry from the fast-track career in medicine that she was once charting in Berlin: Barbara has been officially “relocated” due to the fact that she has requested an exit visa from the GDR, a fall from grace which most in this society of few secrets instantly recognizes and pounces upon. She is sullen and remote, spurning the companionship of her colleagues, particularly the sincere and love-sick Dr. André Reiser (Ronald Zehrfeld), which right away earns her the reputation of a cold, big city snob to go on top of her apparent political crimes. Yet it soon becomes clear that Barbara has a secret connection to the West and one which she aims to exploit, this in spite of the watchful eyes of her neighbors and the local Stasi agent’s (Rainer Bock) withering attention, resulting in humiliating searches of her flat and her person at seemingly any time, day or night.

Though Barbara is increasingly drawn into the provincial life of the hospital around her and better learns to see the world from André’s humanistic viewpoint she still retains her ultimate desire to escape to the West… doesn’t she?

Barbara tells the story of the GDR in an intimate, restrained fashion, focusing on the life of the title character and her relationships with those around her, especially the lovelorn André and a hard-luck young patient named Stella (Jasna Fritzi Bauer) for whom she forms a strong and  endearing maternal attachment. The performances in the film are understated and powerful, with particular praise going to the gutsy Hoss in the title role. The cinematography, editing, and production design are all first-rate and refreshingly side-step the typical clichés of depicting life under a totalitarian regime in broad strokes and severe gestures, focusing instead on the human-scale sadness of a society divided against itself.

Petzold, who previously gained attention for his drama YELLA (2007) (also starring Hoss), won the Silver Bear as Best Director for Barbara at the 2012 Berlin Film Festival, heralding perhaps a breakthrough for him, as well as his willowy star, Hoss. Barbara succeeds as a meditation on the life-draining paranoia and amnesia inherent to life under such cruel circumstances, but also ultimately reveals the strength which can unexpectedly come in dark times.

For an alternate but equally-moving take on this same subject matter be sure to see (if you have not already) the widely-heralded 2006 GDR-set drama/thriller THE LIVES OF OTHERS.

Music: The Grimm Generation to play Thurs., Nov. 21, at 8 PM

The Grimm Generation play the Best Video Performance space on Thursday, Nov. 21. The music begins at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

The Grimm Generation sound has been described as “Morning After Music” and “Radio Songs For Voyeurs” though we have personally described as “If Alan Lomax and Ziggy Stardust had a baby.” It’s creepy, suburban pop-noir made and played by creepy suburbanites.

Carmen Champagne and Jason P. Krug started The Grimm Generation as an outlet to tell real time stories of cheap excess and alcohol, but with the addition of Lys Guillorn (lapsteel, banjo, bells, rawk guitar), Eric Bloomquist (bass) and Julie Drechsler (cello), the group has evolved into more a sweeping soundtrack of a movie that may be your real life.

Here is the band’s video for their new song “The Next Indie Boy”:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Wednesday, Dec. 4. CONTRA DANCE MUSIC: WRY BRED

• Thursday, Dec. 5. GARAGE ROCK/POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring BEST VIDEO’S OWN RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 11. WORLD MUSIC/FOLK: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Thursday, Dec. 12. JAZZ: DAVID CHEVAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 18. JAZZ: THE KITCHEN SINK with NICK Di MARIA

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

 

Rob Harmon’s recommendations 11/12/13

ROB HARMON’S PICKS 11/12/13

Rob_Harmon_image_for_picksJEAN GRÉMILLON DURING THE OCCUPATION

The inventory of movies here at Best Video is vast: with tens of thousands of titles and over 200 sections the collection is so vast that even an employee like me can find myself getting lost in its depths from time-to-time! And with such a huge catalogue there is an ever-present danger: that movies – even great ones – can fall between the cracks.

Take the work of French director Jean Grémillon, for example. If you have not heard of Grémillon you are certainly not alone: in a career which spanned from the 1920’s to the 50’s Grémillon tends to be overshadowed by his poetic realist contemporaries like Renoir, Carné, or Duvivier. I was unaware, myself, until about ten years ago when I was living in New York and was lucky enough to go, on a whim, one night to see Grémillon’s 1937 film GUELE d’AMOUR. I was completely won over by this fatalistic love story about a cocksure military officer and lothario, played by Jean Gabin, both meeting his match and brought to his knees by a beautiful woman of luxury, played by Mireille Balin. The emotions at work were outsized and a little volcanic, sure, but they were also true and hit home. From then on I caught Grémillon’s films any chance that I could.

Aiding the cause of making Grémillon’s name better known is the Criterion Collection, which graciously released a trio of outstanding films of his on DVD last year, all penned by poetic realist stalwarts such as Jacques Prévert and Charles Spaak, starring the radiant French leading lady Madeleine Renaud, and all made during the German occupation. Appropriately enough, the set is entitled Jean Grémillon During the Occupation.

Jean_Gremillon_set_DVDREMORQUES (1941) concerns the day-to-day dangers and realities of a hard-bitten tugboat crew and the patient women—their wives and lovers—who wait at home and take care of them. The film stars Gabin and Renaud, as husband and wife André and Yvonne, he the captain of the crew, and the stunning Michèle Morgan (THE FALLEN IDOL, PORT OF SHADOWS) as a mysterious woman named Catherine whom André rescues, initiating a desperate affair which seriously threatens the stability of home life.

LUMIÈRE D’ÉTÉ (1943) is a moody masterpiece set in the mountains in Provençal. Michèle (Madeleine Robinson) is a beautiful young woman whose future is ahead of her yet she is desperately attached to the fatalistic, dipsomaniac artist Roland (Pierre Brasseur); Patrice (Paul Bernard) is a decadent aristocrat living on a palatial-but-lonely estate who falls for Michèle, which causes jealousy from his long-time lover, Christine or “Cri-Cri” (Renaud), owner of the glass-enclosed mountain-top hotel The Guardian Angel. Into this already tightly-knit web is injected hunky and sincere, young worker Julien (Georges Marchal), who similarly falls in love with Michèle and who works at the massive construction site nearby—a Mephistophelean nightmare of nocturnal activity—where a dam is being constructed and the dynamite blasting seems to go on ominously and continuously.

LE CIEL EST À VOUS (translatable as the “The Sky is Yours,” 1944) is a nostalgic and warm-hearted drama about family life in a small town and a mother whose love of flying puts her at odds with her expected role in the home. Charles Vanel and Renaud star as Pierre and Thérèse Gauthier, a loving couple and parents of two children whose love is put to the test when Thérèse, jealous of her mechanic husband’s—a former WWI airman—intense interest in aviation spurs her to take up the sport for herself, eventually aiming to break a risky distance flying record. The tension in Le Ciel comes not from unrequited or doomed love (interestingly, all of the flying action is either observed from the ground or takes place off-screen) but from the everyday problems of hard-working people trying to free themselves through pursuit of their dreams, even when those passions threaten to become obsessions and bring everything crashing back down to earth. Renaud is commanding: both her brave performance and the portrayal of a family trying to pull together in hard times make it easy to see how this film would have appealed highly to wartime audiences living under the boot of Nazi control.

In all three films Grémillon’s controlled, often studio-shot virtuoso camerawork is on display: intricate special-effects and tracking shots used during the daring tugboat rescue in Remorques, as well as an extended wedding sequence; a concluding masked ball in Lumière which is a marvel for the eyes to behold; and a sensationally long and idyllic take at the outset of Le Ciel—the camera pans right from a flock of bleating sheep moving across a field to a group of schoolchildren singing and playing, as they eventually are reassembled and begin walking back into town.

If poetic realism is your thing—fatalistic love affairs; settings both picturesque and squalid; buffoonish and hilarious performances by great French character actors such as Léonce Corne; high and low classes intermingling in the ebb and flow of destiny; world-weary protagonists who pontificate and sigh piquant observations on the injustices of life; and plots by turns quotidian or shot through with broad symbolism—then Jean Grémillon’s world is for you.

In the meantime, stay tuned: we will continue to dig around here at Best Video and let you know what other buried treasure we find.

Music: Ilana Zsigmond show, scheduled for Thursday, postponed due to illness

The Ilana Zsigmond show, scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 14—has been postponed due to illness. Hopefully this show ill be rescheduled for sometime in the new year.

Music: String quartet rock by The Tet Offensive on Wed., Nov. 20, at 8 PM

Tet_Offensive_official_WebThe Tet Offensive play the Best Video Performance Space on Wed., Nov. 20. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

The Tet Offensive are a string quartet-powered rock band led by singer and composer Brian Robinson. Formed in New York City, the Tet Offensive played to audiences at CBGBs and the Knitting Factory covering bands as wide-ranging as Nirvana and the Bee Gees. Now based in New Haven, CT, the Tet Offensive has become a formidable ensemble, performing original songs deeply influenced by bands like the White Stripes, Radiohead and Led Zeppelin. It’s the Tet Offensive’s mission to show that traditionally “classical” instruments have just as much bite and visceral energy as the standard rock quartet.

Watch The Tet Offensive play Brian Robinson’s composition “Time Out” at Cafe Nine this past February:

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Wednesday, Dec. 4. CONTRA DANCE MUSIC: WRY BRED

• Thursday, Dec. 5. GARAGE ROCK/POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring BEST VIDEO’S OWN RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 11. WORLD MUSIC/FOLK: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Thursday, Dec. 12. JAZZ: DAVID CHEVAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 18. JAZZ: THE KITCHEN SINK with NICK Di MARIA

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

Music: Ilana Zsigmond on Thurs., Nov. 14, at 8 PM; UPDATE: Postponed

Ilana_Zsigmond_02_Web

UPDATE Tuesday, Nov. 12: The Ilana Zsigmond show scheduled is being postponed due to illness.

Ilana Zsigmond will perform in the Best Video Performance Space on Thursday, Nov. 14. The music starts at 8 PM and the cover is $5.

Ilana Zsigmond is a word nerd of indeterminate age that likes Spider-Man, novelty band-aids, and semi-colons. If she could live entirely on fried rice and sci-fi movies, she would be truly happy. She currently makes music on planet earth with her cat Max and several pet humans that insist are her family.

Music has been a constant through her entire life. She began playing classical piano at 4 and guitar at 10. She draws a lot inspiration from The Shins, Bright Eyes and her parents.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Nov. 6. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ESTHER GOLTON

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Wednesday, Dec. 4. FOLK MUSIC: WRY BRED

• Thursday, Dec. 5. GARAGE ROCK/POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring BEST VIDEO’S OWN RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 11. WORLD MUSIC/FOLK: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Thursday, Dec. 12. JAZZ: DAVID CHEVAN

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

Rob Harmon’s recommendations 11/05/13

ROB HARMON’S PICKS 11/05/13

Rob_Harmon_image_for_picks“This is where it ends,” states Céline (Julie Delpy) early in Richard Linklater’s sensational new feature BEFORE MIDNIGHT, impulsively reacting to her long-time lover’s Jesse (Ethan Hawke) feelings of regret over having to live so far from his teenage son. “This is how people start breaking up.”

Before Midnight follows on the heels of Linklater’s BEFORE SUNRISE (1995) and BEFORE SUNSET (2004), both of which have charted the relationship of the French Céline and the American Jesse, through the first, romantic flushes of love as they meet and spend the day in Vienna, and then picking up again about ten years later with their unexpected reunion in Paris, awkwardly attempting to come to grips with their feelings, both past and present. Is Before Midnight meant to represent the end of that relationship?

The film, itself, presents no easy answers on this subject: just as this inordinately charming series of films has been constructed in an unorthodox manner it would probably be a mistake to make such an assumption. In fact, Before Midnight is open to many interpretations.

The action picks up at the tail end of a summer holiday in the southern Peloponnese in Greece: Jesse, now a well-established writer, sees his teenage son Hank off at the airport where he will return home to Chicago to live with his mother, Jesse’s vindictive ex-wife who has never forgiven him for leaving her for Céline. Jesse experiences deep pangs of guilt and regret at his having to live in Paris, so far away from Hank. These feelings continue on the drive back, with Céline and their twin daughters, to the villa where they have been the guests for six weeks of a prominent writer, Patrick (Walter Lassally), leading to a discussion between Céline and Jesse of their deepest priorities in life. Céline, Jesse, and daughters Ella and Nina are nearing the end of their stay and the various guests gather together that evening for a dinner in which all manner of topics, both mundane and metaphysical, profane and profound, are openly discussed, from relationships to time and the meaning of everything. Some fellow guests purchase for Céline and Jesse a room at a posh nearby hotel and offer to take care of the girls for a night in order to allow them a romantic evening together. What begins as a night of inventive and meaningful conversation and foreplay quickly devolves, however, as the two lovers’ increasingly embattled visions of motherhood, fatherhood, career, and resulting sensations of guilt come into play, resulting in a night of bickering, accusations, and, ultimately, some kind of an uncertain new stand-off or truce.

Actually, to call this Linklater’s series would be a major oversight of a few people, namely, Kim Krizan, Linklater’s collaborator on the screenplay of the initial film in the series and, most importantly, the stars and co-writers of the second and third films, Hawke and Delpy. It would certainly be appropriate to say at this point that the “Céline and Jesse” films belong at least as much to Delpy and Hawke as they do to Linklater. Their performances are exceptional here, from Delpy simulating a rodent’s orgasm or the fawning attentions of one of Jesse’s literary fans to Hawke’s pained looks of regret in the airport before his son departs. Similarly deserving of praise is Graham Reynolds, whose loping score perfectly matches the gait of this perambulatory film, and director of photography Christos Voudouris, whose lensing of the Greek landscape is gorgeous.

Yet it is impossible to overlook Linklater and marvel at what he has become: this shambling, insouciant hero of the early-90’s, grunge-era, Austin, TX indie film scene, now grown into one of American cinema’s most adult, erudite, and consistent voices. Céline and Jesse, like many of his best characters (see also SLACKER, DAZED AND CONFUSED, WAKING LIFE) are peripatetic, and do their best thinking on their feet—or, as is often the case in America, driving around in a car!—the camera merely taking in action and recording dialogue as characters move freely about. Before Midnight features many breathtakingly long and patient sequences and shots, such as the 13-minute drive back from the airport (all done in one take with a brief cutaway) and the final three-and-a-half minute shot, heartbreaking in its finality and implications. This is movie-making for grown-ups at its finest.

In a film whose characters ponder the tenuousness of the moment and the ephemeral nature of existence itself perhaps Before Midnight‘s greatest statement is made by Natalia (played by veteran Greek actress Xenia Kalogeropoulou in a scene-stealing moment) as she muses on the flickering memory of her late, beloved husband: “It’s just like our life, hmm? We appear and we disappear and we are so important to some but we are just… passing through.”

Music: Esther Golton performance, scheduled for Nov. 6, postponed

Unfortunately, singer-songwriter Esther Golton—who was scheduled to play the Best Video Performance Space on Wednesday, Nov. 6—has to postpone her appearance due to health reasons. Golton charmed the audience when she played the room this past April, accompanying her singing with mountain dulcimer and regaling attendees with her stories about living in the Alaskan wilderness.

We wish Esther a quick recovery.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Monday, Nov. 4. FILM SCREENING: “IN THE BEDROOM”

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Thursday, Dec. 5. GARAGE ROCK/POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring BEST VIDEO’S OWN RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 11. WORLD MUSIC/FOLK: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Thursday, Dec. 12. JAZZ: DAVID CHEVAN

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU

Mediterranean wine tasting with Bob Feinn Wed., Nov. 13, at 6 PM—Reserve your place now!

Wine expert Bob Feinn of Mt. Carmel Wine & Spirits returns to Best Video on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at 6 PM for a tutorial and wine tasting. Feinn has presented wine tastings twice before at the store and the events have been well-attended, educational and—most important—fun. The cost for this event is only $20 and seating is limited. Call Best Video at (203) 287-9286 for reservations.

Bob_Feinn_mediterranean_sea_Web

The theme this time is good, affordable wines from the Mediterranean countries: France, Italy and Spain. Mediterranean-themed hors d’oeuvre will be available and are included in the event price.

Don’t miss this one. Reservations are very strongly recommended. This is a great opportunity to learn about and stock up on quality affordable wines, guided by the advice of an expert.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE SPACE EVENTS:

• Thursday, Nov. 7. GARAGE FOLK: ELISON JACKSON

• Monday, Nov. 11. FILM SCREENING: “THE SEARCHERS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 13. WINE TASTING with BOB FEINN FROM MT. CARMEL WINE & SPIRITS

• Thursday, Nov. 14. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Wednesday, Nov. 20. STRING QUARTET ROCK: THE TET OFFENSIVE

• Thursday, Nov. 21. APOCALYPTIC POP: THE GRIMM GENERATION

• Wednesday, Dec. 4. FOLK MUSIC: WRY BRED

• Thursday, Dec. 5. GARAGE ROCK/POP: HAPPY ENDING featuring BEST VIDEO’S OWN RICHARD BROWN & HANK HOFFMAN

• Wednesday, Dec. 11. WORLD MUSIC/FOLK: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Thursday, Dec. 12. JAZZ: DAVID CHEVAN

• Thursday, Dec. 19. PUNK ROCK: STARK RAVING LULU