UPDATE: “Found Horizons” film series to start Mon., Feb. 16, at 7 PM with screening of “About Schmidt”

All_7_posters_Late_Quartet_2_rows_WebThe next film series in collaboration with Temple Beth Sholom begins Monday, Feb. 16, at 7 PM with a screening of the 2002 comedy/drama “About Schmidt.” The initial starting date of Feb. 9 had to be pushed back due to bad weather. “Found Horizons: Changes and Choices in Mid-Life” will feature powerful films in which the protagonists face stark mid-life choices. As has been our practice, each screening will begin with a short, context-setting introduction and by followed by an optional discussion.

Each screening begins at 7 PM. The cost for each movie is $5 and reservations are encouraged. The series is co-sponsored by Temple Beth Sholom Adult Education.

The schedule:

Monday, Feb. 16: “About Schmidt” (2002)

In this alternately outrageous, hilarious and tender film directed by Alexander Payne (“Nebraska,” “The Descendants,” “Sideways”) Jack Nicholson offers one of his iconic roles as an insurance worker who, upon retirement from a safe, predictable life, embarks on a journey to his estranged daughter’s wedding only to discover more about himself and life than he ever expected.

Monday, Feb. 23: “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (1989)

(Martin Landau, Woody Allen) Without forsaking his self-reflexive humor, this Woody Allen film offers one of the most profound examinations of temptation and guilt. Oscar-nominated for Best actor, director and writing.

Monday, Mar. 2: “The Swimmer” (1968)

In this unique movie filmed in New Canaan, CT, a charismatic and mysterious man (played by Burt Lancaster), after a summer away, decides to swim in a succession of his neighbor’s pools that lead to his home, a stunt that winds up telling his life story. Engaging poolside encounters with an interesting cast of characters (including Joan Rivers, Marge Champion and Cornelius Otis Skinner) lead to a shattering revelation in this film that, once seen, is never forgotten.

Monday, Mar. 9: “Gran Torino” (2008)

In this multiple award winning film and old school parable, Clint Eastwood (who also directed the film) plays a disgruntled Korean veteran living alone in a Vietnamese neighborhood, determined to fight his own demons and prejudices with grit and resolve. DIRTY HARRY grows up.

Monday, Mar. 16: “Now, Voyager” (1942)

Can a Boston spinster without self-esteem and completely dominated by her wealthy mother blossom under therapy and find impossible romance? One of the most romantic movies – and perhaps most affecting Bette Davis film – ever made.

Monday, Mar. 23: “Up in the Air” (2009)

In this very contemporary film starring George Clooney and Vera Farmiga, Clooney enjoys a lucrative virtual life flying around the country firing people on behalf of their corporations, until he finds this perfect life threatened by a new hire and a frequent-traveler woman of his dreams.

Monday, Mar. 30: “A Late Quartet” (2012)

“A Late Quartet” one of Best Video owner Hank Paper’s favorite films of the last couple of years. Featuring rapturous music and bravura acting (including Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener, and Christopher Walken in a completely involving “straight” role), this dramatic film portrays a classical string quartet, approaching its 25th anniversary recital, that suddenly finds itself struggling to stay together in the face of long suppressed emotions, competing egos and uncontrollable lust. It’s what movies are all about!

UPCOMING EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Feb. 11. JAZZ: BRETT BOTTOMLEY

• Thursday, Feb. 12. INDIE ROCK: HAPPY ENDING, LYS GUILLORN

• Friday, Feb. 13. BLUEGRASS: DUDLEY FARM STRING BAND

• Monday, Feb. 16. FILM SCREENING: “ABOUT SCHMIDT”

• Wednesday, Feb. 18. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Friday, Feb. 20. INDIE ROCK: THE MOUNTAIN MOVERS

• Thursday, Feb. 26. BLUEGRASS: CHURCH SECTS

• Friday, Feb. 27. FUNK/ROCK: HOLIDAY PING

• Monday, Mar. 2. FILM SCREENING: “THE SWIMMER”

• Wednesday, Mar. 4. THEATRICAL READING: “COZY BEACH” by STEVE BELLWOOD

• Thursday, Mar. 5. SINGER-SONGWRITER: THE ANNE MARIE MENTA BAND

• Friday, Mar. 6. JAZZ: NICK DiMARIA WiRED

• Monday, Mar. 9. FILM SCREENING: “GRAN TORINO”

• Wednesday, Mar. 11. ROCK: ROPE, BOP TWEEDIE

• Friday, Mar. 13. BLUEGRASS: THE WOOL HATS STRING BAND

• Monday, Mar. 16. FILM SCREENING: “NOW, VOYAGER”

• Wednesday, Mar. 18. MODERN ROCK SPOKEN WORD SONGSTRESS/INDIE FOLK ROCK: SHADOW & COMPANY

• Thursday, Mar. 19. RAGTIME/BLUES: THE RED HOTS

• Friday, Mar. 20. ALT-COUNTRY: MERCY MEADOWS

• Monday, Mar. 23. FILM SCREENING: “UP IN THE AIR”

• Monday. Mar. 30. FILM SCREENING: “A LATE QUARTET”

• Thursday, April 2. ROCK/POP: THE SHELLYE VALAUSKAS EXPERIENCE

• Friday, April 3. AVANT-GARDE: ZERO DOLLAR

• Thursday, Apr. 9. 150th ANNIVERSARY OF APPOMATTOX/FOLK MUSIC: SHELDON CAMPBELL

• Friday, Apr. 10. ROCK: PARKER’S TANGENT

• Friday, April 17. WPKN BENEFIT

• Thursday, Apr. 23. ECLECTIC ACOUSTIC MUSIC: PRESTER JOHN featuring SHAWN PERSINGER & DAVID MILLER

• Friday, May 1. FILM FEST: “A DARK ROOM”

• Wednesday, Aug. 26. BLUEGRASS: STACY PHILLIPS & HIS BLUEGRASS CHARACTERS

 

Monday’s screening of “A Late Quartet” postponed due to weather

Due to the predicted snow and ice storm tomorrow, we are postponing the screening of “A Late Quartet.” It will be shown instead at the end of the series on Mon., Mar. 30.

Weather permitting (!), the first film in the series will now be “About Schmidt,” starting Jack Nicholson and directed by Alexander Payne (“The Descendants,” “Nebraska,” “Sideways”). “About Schmidt” will be screened Monday, Feb. 16, at 7 PM.

Film screening: “A Late Quartet” replaces “Lost Horizon” as opening film in new film series, Mon., Feb. 9, at 7 PM (UPDATED)

All_7_posters_Late_Quartet_2_rows_WebThe next film series in collaboration with Temple Beth Sholom begins Monday, Feb. 9, at 7 PM with a screening of the 2012 drama “A Late Quartet,” just substituted for the originally planned “Lost Horizon” (for reasons noted below). “Found Horizons: Changes and Choices in Mid-Life” will feature powerful films in which the protagonists face stark mid-life choices. As has been our practice, each screening will begin with a short, context-setting introduction and by followed by an optional discussion.

Each screening begins at 7 PM. The cost for each movie is $5 and reservations are encouraged. The series is co-sponsored by Temple Beth Sholom Adult Education.

Due to a annoyingly restored version of “Lost Horizon” being the only version extant, we are going to screen another movie in its place, which deals forthrightly and grippingly with the issues of the series—powerful films in which the protagonists face stark mid-life choices—and happens to be one of Best Video owner Hank Paper’s favorite films of the last couple of years: “A Late Quartet.”

Featuring rapturous music and bravura acting (including Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener, and Christopher Walken in a completely involving “straight” role), this dramatic film portrays a classical string quartet, approaching its 25th anniversary recital, that suddenly finds itself struggling to stay together in the face of long suppressed emotions, competing egos and uncontrollable lust. It’s what movies are all about!

The rest of the schedule:

Monday, Feb. 16: “About Schmidt” (2002)

In this alternately outrageous, hilarious and tender film directed by Alexander Payne (“Nebraska,” “The Descendants,” “Sideways”) Jack Nicholson offers one of his iconic roles as an insurance worker who, upon retirement from a safe, predictable life, embarks on a journey to his estranged daughter’s wedding only to discover more about himself and life than he ever expected.

Monday, Feb. 23: “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (1989)

(Martin Landau, Woody Allen) Without forsaking his self-reflexive humor, this Woody Allen film offers one of the most profound examinations of temptation and guilt. Oscar-nominated for Best actor, director and writing.

Monday, Mar. 2: “The Swimmer” (1968)

In this unique movie filmed in New Canaan, CT, a charismatic and mysterious man (played by Burt Lancaster), after a summer away, decides to swim in a succession of his neighbor’s pools that lead to his home, a stunt that winds up telling his life story. Engaging poolside encounters with an interesting cast of characters (including Joan Rivers, Marge Champion and Cornelius Otis Skinner) lead to a shattering revelation in this film that, once seen, is never forgotten.

Monday, Mar. 9: “Gran Torino” (2008)

In this multiple award winning film and old school parable, Clint Eastwood (who also directed the film) plays a disgruntled Korean veteran living alone in a Vietnamese neighborhood, determined to fight his own demons and prejudices with grit and resolve. DIRTY HARRY grows up.

Monday, Mar. 16: “Now, Voyager” (1942)

Can a Boston spinster without self-esteem and completely dominated by her wealthy mother blossom under therapy and find impossible romance? One of the most romantic movies – and perhaps most affecting Bette Davis film – ever made.

Monday, Mar. 23: “Up in the Air” (2009)

In this very contemporary film starring George Clooney and Vera Farmiga, Clooney enjoys a lucrative virtual life flying around the country firing people on behalf of their corporations, until he finds this perfect life threatened by a new hire and a frequent-traveler woman of his dreams.

UPCOMING EVENTS:

• Wednesday, Feb. 4. ALT-COUNTRY: LINES WEST

• Friday, Feb. 6. AVANT-GARDE: RIVENER, LIGHT UPON BLIGHT

• Monday, Feb. 9. FILM SCREENING: “LOST HORIZON” “A LATE QUARTET”

• Wednesday, Feb. 11. JAZZ: BRETT BOTTOMLEY

• Thursday, Feb. 12. INDIE ROCK: HAPPY ENDING, LYS GUILLORN

• Friday, Feb. 13. BLUEGRASS: DUDLEY FARM STRING BAND

• Monday, Feb. 16. FILM SCREENING: “ABOUT SCHMIDT”

• Wednesday, Feb. 18. SINGER-SONGWRITER: ILANA ZSIGMOND

• Friday, Feb. 20. INDIE ROCK: THE MOUNTAIN MOVERS

• Monday, Feb. 23. FILM SCREENING: “CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS”

• Thursday, Fen. 26. BLUEGRASS: CHURCH SECTS

• Friday, Feb. 27. FUNK/ROCK: HOLIDAY PING

• Monday, Mar. 2. FILM SCREENING: “THE SWIMMER”

• Thursday, Mar. 5. SINGER-SONGWRITER: THE ANNE MARIE MENTA BAND

• Friday, Mar. 6. JAZZ: NICK DiMARIA WiRED

• Monday, Mar. 9. FILM SCREENING: “GRAN TORINO”

• Monday, Mar. 16. FILM SCREENING: “NOW, VOYAGER”

• Monday, Mar. 23. FILM SCREENING: “UP IN THE AIR”

• Friday, April 3. AVANT-GARDE: ZERO DOLLAR

• Thursday, Apr. 9. 150th ANNIVERSARY OF APPOMATTOX/FOLK MUSIC: SHELDON CAMPBELL

• Friday, April 17. WPKN BENEFIT

• Friday, May 1. FILM FEST: “A DARK ROOM”

• Wednesday, Aug. 26. BLUEGRASS: STACY PHILLIPS & HIS BLUEGRASS CHARACTERS

Next film series—”Found Horizons: Changes and Choices in Mid-Life”—begins Mon., Feb. 9

All_7_posters_2_rows_WebThe next film series in collaboration with Temple Beth Sholom begins Monday, Feb. 9, at 7 PM with a screening of the 1937 Frank Capra-directed “Lost Horizon.” “Found Horizons: Changes and Choices in Mid-Life” will feature powerful films in which the protagonists face stark mid-life choices. As has been our practice, each screening will begin with a short, context-setting introduction and by followed by an optional discussion.

Each screening begins at 7 PM. The cost for each movie is $5 and reservations are encouraged. The series is co-sponsored by Temple Beth Sholom Adult Education.

This is the schedule:

Monday, Feb. 9: “Lost Horizon” (1937)

Action adventure meets mystical adventure in this Frank Capra, Best Picture Oscar nominated film about a disparate group of travelers whose plane crashes in Shangri-La – each individual confronts change and possibility, but is it the miraculous utopia it’s supposed to be?

Monday, Feb. 16: “About Schmidt” (2002)

In this alternately outrageous, hilarious and tender film directed by Alexander Payne (“Nebraska,” “The Descendants,” “Sideways”) Jack Nicholson offers one of his iconic roles as an insurance worker who, upon retirement from a safe, predictable life, embarks on a journey to his estranged daughter’s wedding only to discover more about himself and life than he ever expected.

Monday, Feb. 23: “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (1989)

(Martin Landau, Woody Allen) Without forsaking his self-reflexive humor, this Woody Allen film offers one of the most profound examinations of temptation and guilt. Oscar-nominated for Best actor, director and writing.

Monday, Mar. 2: “The Swimmer” (1968)

In this unique movie filmed in New Canaan, CT, a charismatic and mysterious man (played by Burt Lancaster), after a summer away, decides to swim in a succession of his neighbor’s pools that lead to his home, a stunt that winds up telling his life story. Engaging poolside encounters with an interesting cast of characters (including Joan Rivers, Marge Champion and Cornelius Otis Skinner) lead to a shattering revelation in this film that, once seen, is never forgotten.

Monday, Mar. 9: “Gran Torino” (2008)

In this multiple award winning film and old school parable, Clint Eastwood (who also directed the film) plays a disgruntled Korean veteran living alone in a Vietnamese neighborhood, determined to fight his own demons and prejudices with grit and resolve. DIRTY HARRY grows up.

Monday, Mar. 16: “Now, Voyager” (1942)

Can a Boston spinster without self-esteem and completely dominated by her wealthy mother blossom under therapy and find impossible romance? One of the most romantic movies – and perhaps most affecting Bette Davis film – ever made.

Monday, Mar. 23: “Up in the Air” (2009)

In this very contemporary film starring George Clooney and Vera Farmiga, Clooney enjoys a lucrative virtual life flying around the country firing people on behalf of their corporations, until he finds this perfect life threatened by a new hire and a frequent-traveler woman of his dreams.

Film screening: “I Confess” on Mon., Nov. 17, 7 PM, as part of “Religion and Society” film series

I_Confess_poster_WebIt’s no joke! The current film series in collaboration with Temple Beth Sholom continues next Tuesday with the Alfred Hitchcock-directed “I Confess,” starring Montgomery Clift. “A Rabbi, A Priest and A Minister Walk Into Best Video Performance Space” features powerful films with the theme of religion and society. As has been our practice, each screening begins with a short, context-setting introduction and is followed by an optional discussion.

Each screening begins at 7 PM. The cost for each movie is $5 and reservations are highly encouraged. The first two screening attracted capacity audiences.

This is the upcoming schedule:

Mon., Nov. 17: “I Confess”

In this unique drama stunningly filmed in Quebec, a murderer confesses his heinous crime to Father Michael Logan, a local priest who, because of the sanctity of the confessional, cannot reveal the confession, not even when he himself becomes the leading suspect! This model piece of film-making directed by Alfred Hitchcock features haunting location shots, mounting suspense and, as Father Logan, a charismatic Montgomery Clift whose face you will not be able to take your eyes from. In a film that will have you hooked all the way, you will discover that, while confession may be good for the soul, it also may be deadly to your life.

Mon., Nov. 24: “Babette’s Feast”

In this simple yet sumptuous Oscar winning film, adapted from an Isak Dinesen short story, two beautiful daughters of a devout, self-denying clergyman carry on his austere teachings by sacrificing their youth and passion to faith and duty. Like their entire hamlet, their lives are lived in self-denial. That is, until the arrival of Babette, a mysterious refugee from France’s civil war. As a servant to the daughters for fourteen years, Babette suddenly reveals her own passion and artistry that moves toward a tumultuous transformation of the town’s inhabitants. This film will raise issues of art and duty, self-indulgence and self-denial, asking the question: can or should there be a balance?

Mon., Dec. 1: “Doubt”

Sister Aloysius Beauvier, played by Meryl Streep, is the rigid and fearsome principal of a Bronx Catholic high school who has an extreme dislike for the progressive and popular parish priest, Father Flynn, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Looking for wrongdoing in every corner, she believes she has uncovered the ultimate sin when she hears Father Flynn has taken a special interest in a troubled boy. But there is no clear proof; the only thing certain is doubt. Based on the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play and nominated for 5 Academy Awards, there is little doubt this is one of the most honored films of recent times. Also starring Amy Adams and Viola Davis, the superbly acted, spellbindingly suspenseful film raises questions about whether doubt should interfere with action when safety is at issue, even when that issue might be personal.

Mon., Dec. 8: “The End of the Affair”

During the London blitz, a married Londoner, played by Julianne Moore, suddenly breaks off a passionate five-year affair with writer, Maurice Bendrix, portrayed by Ralph Fiennes, who suspects another love. When, years later, Fiennes accidentally meets with her dull, civil servant husband, played by Stephen Rea, and then hires a detective to follow Moore, what he discovers becomes a blitz of the soul. This intense adult drama, adapted from a Graham Greene novel and directed by Oscar winner Neal Jordan, poses questions about love, faith and betrayal that will have you searching your own soul long after the movie is done.

UPCOMING EVENTS:

UPCOMING EVENTS:

• Thursday, Nov. 13. SINGER-SONGWRITERS: FRANK CRITELLI, JASON PRINCE

• Friday, Nov. 14. INDIE FOLK: OLIVE TIGER

• Monday, Nov. 17. FILM SCREENING: “I CONFESS”

• Wednesday, Nov. 19. SONGWRITERS’ CIRCLE: MARK MIRANDO, DICK NEAL, LAURA JOY

• Thursday, Nov. 20. FILM SCREENING: “SEVEN DAYS IN MAY”

• Friday, Nov. 21. SINGER-SONGWRITERS: BECKY KESSLER (Violent Mae), SAM PERDUTA (Elison Jackson)

• Monday, Nov. 24. FILM SCREENING: “BABETTE’S FEAST”

• Friday, Nov. 28. PSYCHO-FOLK: MILKSOP: UNSUNG

• Monday, Dec. 1. FILM SCREENING: “DOUBT”

• Thursday, Dec. 4. JAZZ: REBECCA ABBOTT

• Friday, Dec. 5. ACOUSTIC ROCK: THE LONESOME SPARROWS

• Monday, Dec. 8. FILM SCREENING: “THE END OF THE AFFAIR”

• Thursday, Dec. 11. BLUEGRASS: FIVE IN THE CHAMBER

• Monday, Dec. 15. FILM SCREENING: “VISION”

• Thursday, Dec. 18. POST-PUNK: ZOO FRONT, KEVIN MF KING

• Friday, Dec. 19. ALT-COUNTRY: HEATHER FAY

• Friday, Jan. 9. MUSIC FROM “TWIN PEAKS”: DR. CATERWAUL’S CADRE OF CLAIRVOYANT CLAPTRAPS

• Wednesday, Jan. 14. JAZZ: JEFF FULLER & FRIENDS

 

“Religion & Society” movie series starts Mon., Nov. 3, at 7 PM

All_6_movies_WebA rabbi, a priest and a minister walk into Best Video Performance Space…

Wait, it’s no joke! The next film series in collaboration with Temple Beth Sholom begins Monday, Nov. 3, at 7 PM. “A Rabbi, A Priest and A Minister Walk Into Best Video Performance Space” will feature powerful films with the theme of religion and society. As has been our practice, each screening will begin with a short, context-setting introduction and by followed by an optional discussion.

Each screening begins at 7 PM. The cost for each movie is $5 and reservations are encouraged.

This is the schedule:

Mon., Nov. 3: “The Jewish Cardinal”

The Jewish Cardinal tells the true and provocative story of Jean Marie Lustiger who, while retaining his Jewish identity, converts to Catholicism at age 14 and becomes a priest. Quickly rising through the ranks of Bishop, Archbishop, and Cardinal to become personal advisor to Pope John Paul II, he withstands pressure from Jews and Catholics alike as well as his own family while viewing himself as a symbol of religious reconciliation. This human and even-handed portrait of a man both fused and torn raises questions about faith, heritage and identity that is guaranteed to provoke some lively discussions.

Mon., Nov. 10: “A Price Above Rubies”

This passionate, acclaimed film, starring Renee Zellweger and Julianna Margulies, portrays the intense drama of a young wife and mother in a Brooklyn Hasidic community who—struggling against a patriarchal world she finds isolating, lonely and oppressive—seeks to establish for herself a life of independence and artistic fulfillment beyond her community’s religious and personal strictures while attempting to overcome a terrible secret that could shatter both her and it.

Mon., Nov. 17: “I Confess”

In this unique drama stunningly filmed in Quebec, a murderer confesses his heinous crime to Father Michael Logan, a local priest who, because of the sanctity of the confessional, cannot reveal the confession, not even when he himself becomes the leading suspect! This model piece of film-making directed by Alfred Hitchcock features haunting location shots, mounting suspense and, as Father Logan, a charismatic Montgomery Clift whose face you will not be able to take your eyes from. In a film that will have you hooked all the way, you will discover that, while confession may be good for the soul, it also may be deadly to your life.

Mon., Nov. 24: “Babette’s Feast”

In this simple yet sumptuous Oscar winning film, adapted from an Isak Dinesen short story, two beautiful daughters of a devout, self-denying clergyman carry on his austere teachings by sacrificing their youth and passion to faith and duty. Like their entire hamlet, their lives are lived in self-denial. That is, until the arrival of Babette, a mysterious refugee from France’s civil war. As a servant to the daughters for fourteen years, Babette suddenly reveals her own passion and artistry that moves toward a tumultuous transformation of the town’s inhabitants. This film will raise issues of art and duty, self-indulgence and self-denial, asking the question: can or should there be a balance?

Mon., Dec. 1: “Doubt”

Sister Aloysius Beauvier, played by Meryl Streep, is the rigid and fearsome principal of a Bronx Catholic high school who has an extreme dislike for the progressive and popular parish priest, Father Flynn, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Looking for wrongdoing in every corner, she believes she has uncovered the ultimate sin when she hears Father Flynn has taken a special interest in a troubled boy. But there is no clear proof; the only thing certain is doubt. Based on the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play and nominated for 5 Academy Awards, there is little doubt this is one of the most honored films of recent times. Also starring Amy Adams and Viola Davis, the superbly acted, spellbindingly suspenseful film raises questions about whether doubt should interfere with action when safety is at issue, even when that issue might be personal.

Mon., Dec. 8: “The End of the Affair”

During the London blitz, a married Londoner, played by Julianne Moore, suddenly breaks off a passionate five-year affair with writer, Maurice Bendrix, portrayed by Ralph Fiennes, who suspects another love. When, years later, Fiennes accidentally meets with her dull, civil servant husband, played by Stephen Rea, and then hires a detective to follow Moore, what he discovers becomes a blitz of the soul. This intense adult drama, adapted from a Graham Greene novel and directed by Oscar winner Neal Jordan, poses questions about love, faith and betrayal that will have you searching your own soul long after the movie is done.

This Monday’s scheduled screening of “Memento” postponed to Mon., Mar. 30

MementoBecause of the rearranging of the store and the relocation of the Performance Space and screening room to the other side of our space, this Monday’s scheduled showing of the 2000 thriller “Memento” is being rescheduled to Monday, Mar. 30. The Mar. 24 screening of “Mulholland Drive” will take place as originally scheduled.

The theme of the current current Best Video/Temple Beth Sholom film series collaboration is “Complex and Compelling: Fun Movies That Make You Think.” Best Video owner Hank Paper and Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic take turns presenting and leading discussions of six unique and stirring films that not only make you think but change the way you think.

Each movie starts at 7 PM. Admission cost is $5. Reservations are highly recommended.

The next film to be shown now will be “Mulholland Drive,” director David Lynch’s 2001 take on film noir. Best Video owner Hank Paper will introduce the film and lead the post-screening discussion. In his 2001 review of “Mulholland Drive, ” film critic Roger Ebert wrote:

David Lynch has been working toward “Mulholland Drive” all of his career, and now that he’s arrived there I forgive him “Wild at Heart” and even “Lost Highway.” At last his experiment doesn’t shatter the test tubes. The movie is a surrealist dreamscape in the form of a Hollywood film noir, and the less sense it makes, the more we can’t stop watching it.

The now final film in the series is the 2000 thriller “Memento.” Best Video staffers Michael Wheatley and Rob Harmon will introduce the film and lead the discussion afterwards. Directed and written by Christopher Nolan, “Memento” stars Guy Pearce. In his 2000 New York Times review critic A.O. Scott wrote:

“Memento” is a brilliant feat of rug-pulling, sure to delight fans of movies like “The Usual Suspects” and “Pi.” Like Darren Aronofsky (who directed “Pi” and last year’s “Requiem for a Dream”), Mr. Nolan demonstrates a supercharged cinematic intelligence. He’s clearly excited by the way the medium can manipulate time and information, folding straightforward events and simple motives into Moebius strips of paradox and indeterminacy.

This is the remaining schedule for “Complex and Compelling”:

• Monday, Mar. 24: MULHOLLAND DRIVE
• Monday, Mar. 30: MEMENTO

Film screening: “Babel,” with Brad Pitt, on Mon., Mar. 10, at 7 PM

The theme of the current current Best Video/Temple Beth Sholom film series collaboration is “Complex and Compelling: Fun Movies That Make You Think.” Best Video owner Hank Paper and Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic will take turns presenting and leading discussions of six unique and stirring films that not only make you think but change the way you think.

Babel

Each movie starts at 7 PM. Admission cost is $5. Reservations are highly recommended.

The third film in the series is the 2006 ensemble drama “Babel.” Directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu and written by Guillermo Arriaga, “Babel” stars Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. “Babel” will be introduced by Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic, who will also moderate the optional post-film discussion.

In his 2006 review critic Roger Ebert wrote:

“Babel” weaves stories from Morocco, America, Mexico and Japan, all connected by the thoughtless act of a child, and demonstrates how each culture works against itself to compound the repercussions. It is the third and most powerful of Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s trilogy of films in which the action is connected or influenced in invisible ways. Sometimes these are called ‘hyperlink films.’ After “Amores Perros” (2000) and “21 Grams” (2003), it shows his mastery of the form, and it surprises us by offering human insight rather than obligatory tragedy.

This is the remaining schedule for “Complex and Compelling”:

• Monday, Mar. 10: BABEL

• Monday, Mar. 17: MEMENTO

• Monday, Mar. 24: MULHOLLAND DRIVE

Film screening: “American Beauty” to be shown Mon., Feb. 24, at 7 PM

American-Beauty-Poster_WebThe current Best Video/Temple Beth Sholom film series collaboration began this past Monday, Feb. 17. The theme this time is “Complex and Compelling: Fun Movies That Make You Think.” Best Video owner Hank Paper and Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic will take turns presenting and leading discussions of six unique and stirring films that not only make you think but change the way you think. There was a strong crowd for the first movie in the series, Howard Hawks’ classic postwar film noir “The Big Sleep.”

Each movie starts at 7 PM. Admission cost is $5 or $25 for all six films.

The second film in the series is the 1999 Oscar winner “American Beauty.” Directed by Sam Mendes, this drama stars Kevin Spacey and Annette Bening. Writing in The New York Times that year film critic Janet Maslin opined, “Lester Burnham, played with heavenly finesse by Kevin Spacey in his wittiest and most agile screen performance yet, is a buttoned-down 42-year-old who desperately needs to stop and smell the roses. But he won’t get much joy from the ones in his suburban yard.”

Maslin writes:

“American Beauty” hammers heavily on the notion that nonconformity is needed here. That thought is repeated frequently and never carries a whit of surprise. But scene by scene, the film is full of its own brand of corrosive novelty, from the way Lester transforms himself in hopes of attracting the cheerleader to the revitalizing effects of Carolyn’s acrobatic affair with a fellow real estate agent (a very smooth Peter Gallagher). As these characters struggle viciously — and hilariously — to escape the middle-class doldrums, the film also evinces a real and ever more stirring compassion.

This is the remaining schedule for “Complex and Compelling”:

• Monday, Feb. 24: AMERICAN BEAUTY

• Monday, Mar. 3: BEING JOHN MALKOVICH

• Monday, Mar. 10: BABEL

• Monday, Mar. 17: MEMENTO

• Monday, Mar. 24: MULHOLLAND DRIVE

New film series “Complex and Compelling” starts Mon., Feb. 17

The next Best Video/Temple Beth Sholom film series collaboration begins Monday, Feb. 17. The theme this time is “Complex and Compelling: Fun Movies That Make You Think.” Best Video owner Hank Paper and Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic will take turns presenting and leading discussions of six unique and stirring films that not only make you think but change the way you think. All movies start at 7 PM and admission is $5 (free for members of Temple Beth Sholom).

Complex_film_series_Web

This is the schedule for “Complex and Compelling”:

• Monday, Feb. 17: “The Big Sleep”

• Monday, Feb. 24: “American Beauty”

• Monday, Mar. 3: “Being John  Malkovich”

• Monday, Mar. 10: “Babel”

• Monday, Mar. 17: “Memento”

• Monday, Mar. 24: “Mulholland Drive”