Tag Archives: world music

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps play Fri., Apr. 1

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps play Best Video Film & Cultural Center Fri., Apr. 1. The show starts at 7 PM and the cover is $10.

This is an indoor show so attendance is 30 max. Proof of vaccination is required to enter and masks are required. (This will be updated if circumstances allow a loosening of these restrictions.)

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps plays music from around the world and uses it as a launching pad for improvisations that never lose their sense of groove—whether it’s Colombian cumbias, Ethiopian jazz, Romanian horas, Argentinian tangos, traditional music from the United States, or original songs by accordionist and singer Adam Matlock.

Among the material the group will play at this show are live scores to three early silent movie short films—Camille de Morlhon and Segundo de Chomón’s “A Panicky Picnic” (1909); Segundo de Chomón’s “Métamorphoses” (1912); and Segundo de Chomón’s “The Haunted House” (1908).

The members of Dr. Caterwaul’s are Adam Matlock, Brian Slattery, Chris Cretella, Mike Tepper, Chris Cretella, and Michael Paolucci.

The Mandingo Ambassadors return to Best Video Fri., Mar. 4, at 7 PM

The Mandingo Ambassadors, led by guitarist Mamady Kouyate, play Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Fri., Mar. 4. The show starts at 7 PM and the cover is $15.

This is an indoor show so attendance is 30 max. Proof of vaccination is required to enter and masks are required.

An African jazz band with beats to make chairs obsolete and melodies to put your mind at ease! Check out NYC’s magnificent Mandingo Ambassadors at this last of the old school video stores (turned non-profit cultural center)!

The Mandingo Ambassadors was founded in New York City by griot-guitarist Mamady Kouyaté in 2005. As a veteran of the great orchestras of the golden age of Guinean dance bands, Kouyate is a living library of musical science inherited from his ancestors and from a half century of experience as an arranger, band leader, accompanist and soloist.

Mamady Kouyaté carried this heritage with him to New York where he has collaborated with members of the West African diaspora and Western musicians to continue the great tradition and sound of Guinean Afro-jazz.

Since the summer of 2008 the group has been in residence at Barbes, performing every Wednesday night at this well-known Brooklyn venue. In addition, they have performed at many clubs, events and festivals including Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Celebrate Brooklyn, and the International Festival of Arts and Ideas.

In a review of a show at Barbès in 2008, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff wrote:

The music of the Mandingo Ambassadors has been structured to make you feel good. It puts dazzling vocal and guitar patterns over a rhythm section that is like a perfect system: a locked drum groove, much of it played on high-hat cymbal and drum rims; soft bass lines that fall short or start late, or leave gaps in a run of notes; fingerpicked rhythm guitar notes like clear fizz. In the small, square backroom of Barbès on Wednesday — as it will be next Wednesday and for Wednesdays to come — the music sounded loud and light and unfailingly right…

It could have gone on forever, and that was a nice thought.

The Lost Tribe perform Afro-Funk Fusion music Fri., Dec. 3

The Lost Tribe plays Best Video Performance Space Fri., Dec. 3. The show starts at 7 PM and the cover is $12.

This is an indoor show so attendance is 30 max. Proof of vaccination is required to enter and masks are required.

The Lost Tribe is a drum-centered Afro-funk fusion ensemble, led by percussionist Jocelyn Pleasant. Their sound winds through many genres that are rooted in West African rhythms and sensibilities. As a traditional percussionist and drum kit player, Pleasant wanted to create a group that showcased the drum as a lead instrument and melodic voice. She started the group in 2016, with the goal of infusing the djembe ensemble into African Diasporic music like jazz, rock, funk, and reggae and hip-hop. Her goal was also to provide a platform for musicians of different but overlapping communities to come together.

In addition to its core members, Lost Tribe performances often include various special guests that reflect the large talent pool of their community. Regardless of the line-up, the staples of a Tribe performance are energy, stage presence and GROOVE. They have opened for international acts Mokoomba (of Zimbabwe), and Trio da Kali (of Mali), were a featured artist at the 2018 Greater Hartford Festival of Jazz, and won first place at the 2019 Valley Music Showcase (of Western Massachusetts).

Their eclectic collection of music is available on Bandcamp and streaming platforms, including the EPs Diaspora and WLCT Radio, as well as two singles released in 2020, Say Their Names and Diaspora Sings.

The members of The Lost Tribe are Jocelyn Pleasant (drums, percussion), Joel Hewitt (bass), Mike Carabello (keys), Doug Wilson (guitar), and Asaad Jackson aka DJ Stealth (turntables, aux percussion).

The Mandingo Ambassadors return with joyous West African jazz Sun., Sept. 19

The Mandingo Ambassadors, led by guitarist Mamady Kouyate, play the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Sun., Sept. 19. The music starts at 5:30 PM. (This show was rescheduled from Aug. 27 due to forecasted thunderstorms that never appeared.)

An African jazz band with beats to make chairs obsolete and melodies to put your mind at ease! Check out NYC’s magnificent Mandingo Ambassadors at this last of the old school video stores (turned non-profit cultural center)!

The Mandingo Ambassadors was founded in New York City by griot-guitarist Mamady Kouyaté in 2005. As a veteran of the great orchestras of the golden age of Guinean dance bands, Kouyate is a living library of musical science inherited from his ancestors and from a half century of experience as an arranger, band leader, accompanist and soloist.

Mamady Kouyaté carried this heritage with him to New York where he has collaborated with members of the West African diaspora and Western musicians to continue the great tradition and sound of Guinean Afro-jazz.

Since the summer of 2008 the group has been in residence at Barbes, performing every Wednesday night at this well-known Brooklyn venue. In addition, they have performed at many clubs, events and festivals including Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Celebrate Brooklyn, and the International Festival of Arts and Ideas.

In a review of a show at Barbès in 2008, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff wrote:

The music of the Mandingo Ambassadors has been structured to make you feel good. It puts dazzling vocal and guitar patterns over a rhythm section that is like a perfect system: a locked drum groove, much of it played on high-hat cymbal and drum rims; soft bass lines that fall short or start late, or leave gaps in a run of notes; fingerpicked rhythm guitar notes like clear fizz. In the small, square backroom of Barbès on Wednesday — as it will be next Wednesday and for Wednesdays to come — the music sounded loud and light and unfailingly right…

It could have gone on forever, and that was a nice thought.

Joining Mamady Kouyate on Aug. 27 will be rhythm guitarist Mamady Kouruma, bass player Emanuel Gatewood, drummer Jeremy Dion.

ABOUT OUR SHOWS:

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps perform Fri., Aug. 20

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps play the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Fri., Aug. 20. The show starts at 5:30 PM.

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps plays music from around the world and uses it as a launching pad for improvisations that never lose their sense of groove—whether it’s Colombian cumbias, Ethiopian jazz, Romanian horas, Argentinian tangos, traditional music from the United States, or original songs by accordionist and singer Adam Matlock.

The members of Dr. Caterwaul’s are Adam Matlock, Brian Slattery, Chris Cretella, Mike Tepper, and Michael Paolucci. (Guitarist Chris Cretella won’t be available for this show.)

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Dr. Caterwaul’s, Leg Up Best Video deck Thurs., Apr. 22, show rescheduled to Sun., May 2

UPDATE, Thurs. morning, Apr. 22: Due to the expected cold temps today, this show has been rescheduled to Sun., May 2, at 5 PM.

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps and Leg Up share the bill on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Thursday, Apr. 22. The music starts at 5 PM.

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps plays music from around the world and uses it as a launching pad for improvisations that never lose their sense of groove—whether it’s Colombian cumbias, Ethiopian jazz, Romanian horas, Argentinian tangos, traditional music from the United States, or original songs by accordionist and singer Adam Matlock.

The members of Dr. Caterwaul’s are Adam Matlock, Brian Slattery, Chris Cretella, Mike Tepper, and Michael Paolucci.

Leo and Brian Slattery (Leg Up) are two musicians—son and father—who have used the quarantine as a chance to work up their swing repertoire with son on violin and father on guitar. Come hang for a happy hour of tunes ranging from Louis Armstrong and Cole Porter to Antonio Carlos Jobim and Django Reinhardt, in all likelihood punctuated by banter filled with outrageous puns.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and masks are mandatory. (Yes, you can lower them to take a drink but please raise them up again.)

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Click here for a complete listing of upcoming events.

Music: The Mandingo Ambassadors (from NYC) return Fri., Feb. 7, at 7:30 PM

Mamady Kouyate of The Mandingo Ambassadors.

The Mandingo Ambassadors, led by Guinean guitarist Mamady Kouyate, play Best Video Performance Space Friday, Feb. 7. The show starts at 7:30 PM and tickets are $10 in advance at BrownPaperTickets.com and $15 at the door.

An African jazz band with beats to make chairs obsolete and melodies to put your mind at ease! Check out NYC’s magnificent Mandingo Ambassadors at this last of the old school video stores (turned non-profit cultural center)!!!

The Mandingo Ambassadors was founded in New York City by griot-guitarist Mamady Kouyaté in 2005. As a veteran of the great orchestras of the golden age of Guinean dance bands, Kouyate is a living library of musical science inherited from his ancestors and from a half century of experience as an arranger, band leader, accompanist and soloist.

Mamady Kouyaté carried this heritage with him to New York where he has collaborated with members of the West African diaspora and Western musicians to continue the great tradition and sound of Guinean Afro-jazz.

Since the summer of 2008 the group has been in residence at Barbes, performing every Wednesday night at this well-known Brooklyn venue. In addition, they have performed at many clubs, events and festivals including Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Celebrate Brooklyn, and the International Festival of Arts and Ideas.

In a review of a show at Barbès in 2008, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff wrote:

The music of the Mandingo Ambassadors has been structured to make you feel good. It puts dazzling vocal and guitar patterns over a rhythm section that is like a perfect system: a locked drum groove, much of it played on high-hat cymbal and drum rims; soft bass lines that fall short or start late, or leave gaps in a run of notes; fingerpicked rhythm guitar notes like clear fizz. In the small, square backroom of Barbès on Wednesday — as it will be next Wednesday and for Wednesdays to come — the music sounded loud and light and unfailingly right…

It could have gone on forever, and that was a nice thought.

Joining Mamady Kouyate on Feb. 7 will be rhythm guitarist Mamady Kouruma, bass player Nick Cudahy, drummer Andy Algire, and conga player Jocelyn Pleasant (and perhaps others).

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Music: Semaphora, Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps play Thurs., Dec. 5, 7:30 PM

Semaphora.

Semaphora and Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps play Best Video Performance Space Thursday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 PM. The cover is a sliding scale of $5-10 (pay what you can in that range).

Semaphora is the musical project of composer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist Lydia Arachne, whose songs draw inspiration from the peculiar lyrical insights of Kate Bush and the harmonic textures of Steely Dan. At its foundation, Semaphora is rock music, but with patches of jazz, reggae, and folk sewn in, all guided forward by dense, poetic lyrics about unconventional subjects.

Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps plays music from around the world and uses it as a launching pad for improvisations that never lose their sense of groove—whether it’s Colombian cumbias, Ethiopian jazz, Romanian horas, Argentinian tangos, or traditional music from the United States.

Based in New Haven, CT, the five-piece—Chris Cretella on guitar, Adam Matlock on accordion and vocals, Michael Paolucci on drums, Brian Slattery on violin, banjo, trombone and vocals, and Mike Tepper on bass—has opened for Xenia Rubinos, the Lost Bayou Ramblers, and the Krar Collective (from Ethiopia). Apart, they have toured the country and ventured into Europe, performing everything from Appalachian fiddle to funk and reggae to experimental new music. Together, they have put on evenings of songs by Kurt Weill and Ennio Morricone and performed back-to-back sold-out sets of music from Twin Peaks. All along, they work up original material by Matlock under his own songwriting project, An Historic.

Always curious, always ready to try new music, Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps moves from genre to genre with a style that’s all its own.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Music: Thabisa, and friend MXO from South Africa, play Tues., Sept. 10

Dynamic Afro-soul singer Thabisa returns to Best Video Performance Space on Tuesday, Sept. 10. Thabisa will share the evening with her friend MXO, another South African r&b singer currently touring the U.S. The show starts at 8 PM.. The cover is a sliding scale of $5-20—pay what you can in that range to support the artists.

Thabisa, a singer songwriter from South Africa and now New Haven’s songbird, will share her talents and journey through music and storytelling. Accompanied by Jim Lawson (bass), Lamar Smith (guitar), Dylan McDonnell (sax/flute), Eric Rey (percussion), and Sam Oliver (drums), she will bring in songs unsung and a few of your favourites from both her “Eyodidi” and “The Journey” albums.

Thabisa’s story begins in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Born and raised by her grandparents in KwaZakhele township, she could always be found singing and dancing outside her home. Neighbors gave her the name “Little Brenda” for the legendary South African pop star Brenda Fassie.

In 2012 she entered the national singing competition, Idols South Africa, and finished in the Top 18. The following year, she signed on with the independent record label Tammy Music and produced two albums, Eyodidi (2015) and The Journey (2013)..

Thabisa currently lives with her family in the United States. “What makes my music worthwhile, is the opportunities it opens for me to work with children and inspire them to dream big” she explained. Thabisa volunteers with children using music, cultural exchange, and story-telling.

MXO was born in Kwa-dwesi, Port Elizabeth in 1978. Singing began quite naturally for him as a young child growing up in the township and participating in both school choir and the scout choir. It was the musical legends such as Letta Mbulu, Hugh Masikela, Miriam Makeba as well as the social and political climate of the early 1980’s that influenced the youngster and he was part of two groups – Black Power Crew and Lil Homies – that were in demand throughout Port Elizabeth.

With lyrics that celebrate life, deal with matters of the heart, are fully respectful of women and address issues like violence against women and the HIV/AIDS pandemic, MXO packs a powerful punch.Live, MXO’s undeniable sex appeal and naturalness on stage is clear for all to see and together with his band Stone (Sabelo is on the guitar, Msebenzi on Bass, Sifiso on the keyboard, Papi on the Sax and Martin on drums), his shows are a must-see event throughout the country.

Globally, MXO looks set to make an impact. Early this year, he collaborated with Grammy Nominee Jamie Catto for the second One Giant Leap project which brings together artists from all corners of the earth.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.

Music: The Mandingo Ambassadors play authentic West African music Fri., Aug. 2

Mamady Kouyate of The Mandingo Ambassadors.

The amazing Mandingo Ambassadors return to Best Video Film & Cultural Center on Friday, Aug. 2, for another sensational show of authentic West African music, led by guitarist Mamady Kouyate. The show starts at 8 PM and the cover is $10.

For those who have seen The Mandingo Ambassadors at Best Video in one of their two previous appearances here, know that they will be taking a somewhat different approach for this gig.

For this show, they are adding an element of West African Classical music to their usual West African Jazz repertoire. This will be a mostly acoustic gig featuring two new—to their performances at Best Video—traditional instruments, the kora and balafon.

The personnel will also be different, and as follows: Mamady “Djelike” Kouyate (guitar),  Arouna “Mamoudouba” Kouyate/ Aaron Latham Greenberg (Kora and Vocals), Dylan Olimpi McDonnell (Flute/Alto Sax), Andy Algire (Bala), Frank Brocklehurst (Bass), and Matt Dean (Percussion).

The show will include at least one (possibly two) performances of traditional Mande “Tariku” or oral histories, sung in the style of the court bards of the old Mali Empire (1230-1630 CE). Think “Game of Thrones”, but with about 100% less white people, and you’re halfway there. These will be performed in Maninka, but then translated into English for the few audience members whose Maninka may be a little rusty.

Click here for the complete list of upcoming events.