New releases 7/27/21

Top Hits
A Quiet Place: Part II (horror/suspense, Emily Blunt. Rotten Tomatoes: 91%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 71. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “And while this new installment is, like its predecessor, wonderfully acted and intuitively directed (by John Krasinski, who is solely responsible for the story this time around), it has also largely replaced the hushed horror of the original with full-on action. Faster, coarser and far noisier, “Part II” sacrifices emotional depth for thriller setups that do less to advance the plot than grow the younger characters.” Read more…)

Jakob’s Wife (horror, Barbara Crampton. Rotten Tomatoes: 84%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 59. From Erik Piepenburg’s capsule New York Times review: “Travis Stevens’s film layers feminism on top of comedy on top of vampire myth and gross-out splatter. It mostly clicks, and the reason is [actress Barbara] Crampton. With a decades-long career in out-there films including ‘Re-Animator,’ she’s as close to acting royalty as horror gets. Here she is fearless as a woman discovering her powers within.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
A Quiet Place: Part II

New Foreign DVDs
Le Crabe-Tambour (France, 1977, war drama. From Vincent Canby’s 1984 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “To come to the point immediately, ‘Le Crabe Tambour,’ Pierre Schoendoerffer’s 1977 French film based on his own French novel, is one of the grandest, most beautiful adventure movies in years. It may be somewhat old-fashioned in its emphasis on courage, honor and the glory of war, no matter what the cause. However, it’s also wonderfully old-fashioned in its convoluted, romantic narrative, which moves from Vietnam, during the collapse of France’s control of Indochina in the 1950’s, to East Africa, Algeria, Brittany, Newfoundland and the stormy fishing grounds on the Grand Banks.” Read more…)

La Piscine aka The Swimming Pool (France, 1969, mystery/suspense, Criterion Collection, Alain Delon. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review of the screening of the restored film: “‘La Piscine,’ made in 1969, is best known in the United States for its remake, Luca Guadagnino’s frisky, borderline frivolous 2016 ‘A Bigger Splash.’ The release of a pristine restoration of the original, directed by Jacques Deray and starring Alain Delon, Romy Schneider, Maurice Ronet and Jane Birkin, should bolster this striking movie’s reputation.” Read more…)

New British DVDs
Gangs of London: Season 1 (action/crime series, Aled ap Steffan. Rotten Tomatoes: 90%. Metacritic: 70. From Simon Abrams’ New York Times article: “The other key components of the series, which premiered in Britain last year, are brutal, dynamic fight scenes that bear the unmistakable signature of Gareth Evans, who created the series with the writer and cinematographer Matt Flannery. Evans, a Welsh filmmaker, is known for his electric action sequences, and the set pieces in ‘Gangs of London’ stand out for their visceral impact, sophisticated choreography and extreme violence.” Read more…)

Unrelated (drama, 2007, Tom Hiddleston. Rotten Tomatoes: 89%. Metacritic: 74. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Stephen Holden’s Times review: “The first film directed by [Joanna] Hogg, ‘Unrelated,’ released in Britain in 2008 and shown here for the first time [in 2014], announced the debut of a significant writing and directing talent. Her more abstract and even chillier third film, ‘Exhibition,’ recently opened in Manhattan. As in ‘Exhibition,’ Ms. Hogg casts a cold eye on the manners of the British upper middle class at play. Except for their accents, these people are identical to a certain class of spoiled, supercilious New Yorkers who exude a smug sense of entitlement.” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Kenny Scharf: When Worlds Collide (art history, pop culture. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. From Glenn Kenny’s New York Times review: “The condition of being an artist and the significance of what an artist produces are two distinct things. The post-pop artist Kenny Scharf, who came out of the same downtown art and music scene as Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Klaus Nomi, is someone whose critical and material stock has risen, fallen and risen again over decades. The documentary ‘Kenny Scharf: When Worlds Collide,’ directed by Max Basch and the artist’s daughter Malia Scharf, makes a considered and not entirely uncritical case for Scharf’s relevance.” Read more…)

Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts (race, history, art, outsider art. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%. Metacritic: 80. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “This documentary, directed by Jeffrey Wolf, is a plain, sincere, nourishing account of the artist. Wolf makes excellent use of photo and film archives, laying out the territory that fed [artist and former slave Bill] Traylor’s vision: dirt roads, railroad tracks, backwoods. These places, the critic and musician Greg Tate notes in the film, lay the ground for the “mystical realm” of Traylor’s work: The deliberately two-dimensional figures and the limited but bold colors have the transfixing power of a waking dream.” Read more…)

UPDATE 7/8—Rescheduled to Aug. 8: The Dave Mazza Group plays jazz

UPDATE: Due to the (alleged) 50-70% threat of thunderstorms, tonight’s scheduled show with The Dave Mazza Group at Best Video Film & Cultural Center has been rescheduled to Sun., Aug. 8, at 5:30 PM.

The jazz quartet The Dave Mazza Group (formerly BadSlax) plays the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Thursday, July 8 Sun., Aug. 8. The music starts at 5:30 PM.

One of the area’s liveliest and groovin’est bands, The Dave Mazza Group is four seasoned musicians who love to play. Their eclectic-but-accessible repertoire which features tunes from some of the great contemporary and classic jazz composers (John Scofield, Pat Metheny, Charles Mingus, Herbie Hancock)–along with some originals–is consistently funky, sometimes swinging, and always cooking.

They recently added a new drummer, Nick D’Errico. Nick joined the lineup of Mark Kaplan, tenor sax; Dave Mazza, guitar; and Jim Ludoviconi, bass.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

For a full list of upcoming events, click here.

Experimental music from Red Rainbow (Anne Rhodes), Carl Testa Sat., Aug. 7

Anne Rhodes aka Red Rainbow and Carl Testa share the bill for an evening of experimental and improvised music on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Sat., Aug 7. The show starts at 5:30 PM.

Anne Rhodes is an experimental vocalist based in New Haven. She performs a broad range of experimental, improvised, and classical music, as a soloist and as a member of ensembles such as Anthony Braxton’s Tri-Centric Vocal ensemble and Carl Testa’s Sway. Her solo project, Red Rainbow, incorporates voice and electronics, looping sounds as diverse as extended techniques and bel canto vocalises, to create layer upon layer of dissonance, harmony, and noise. As a composer, she creates unique embroidered graphic scores.

Carl Testa (b. 1984, Chicago, IL) is a multi-instrumentalist and composer at the intersection of improvised music, jazz, electronics, experimental music, and new media. As a performer/improviser, he is equally comfortable on string bass, electronics, lighting, and combinations thereof. As a composer, he has written acoustic and electronic music for configurations ranging from solo to chamber orchestra, including multimedia pieces that incorporate electronics, lighting, dance, and theater.

Rosalie Coleman is going to be joining Testa on Aug. 7, performing a live coding duo piece using laptops.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Robert Messore’s Toddler Tunes Sat. morning, Aug. 7, outdoors at Best Video

Robert Messore brings his Toddler Tunes kids’ music show to Best Video Film & Cultural Center’s deck Sat., Aug. 7. The event starts at 10:30 AM.

Robert Messore puts on a high-energy sing-and-dance-along program for young children and their parents.

Voted “Best Entertainer for Toddlers” in the 2011 Kidhaven.com readers poll, Messore’s public “Toddler Tunes” program at St. John’s Episcopal Church in New Haven is the place to be every week! The songs are a mix of the classics and some newer songs that folks love. He recognizes that these programs are a place for parents to get together as much as anything, so he encourages folks with newborns through 6-yr-old children to attend.

Suggested donation is $5-10 per family but nobody will be turned away for lack of funds.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are required inside Best Video.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Brian Ember, Psychic Newborns play the deck Fri., Aug. 6

Brian Ember plays the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Fri., Aug. 6. Psychic Newborns open at 5:30 PM with their debut performance.

Classically-trained composer and singer, Brian Ember, hasn’t stopped making music since singing You Are So Beautiful to his mom as a toddler in the bathtub. He loved Elton John, Michael Jackson and Xanadu in a suburban ’80s neighborhood that tried to force KISS, Mötley Crüe and Stryper down his glammy, effeminate gullet.

With a host of works for string quartet, orchestra, and choirs under his belt, Ember started the string quartet-powered rock band, The Tet Offensive in New York City, fusing his love for counterpoint and gut-string with theatrics and thrashing.

Ember left the strings in the background for his first solo endeavour, The New Chastity, a full-on baroque pop album that takes inspiration from late ’70s musicians like Pink Floyd, Leonard Cohen, Eric Carmen and Electric Light Orchestra to deliver a deeply personal record about divorce and lost love.

The follow-up EP, “Tomorrow Looked Better Yesterday” and second LP are coming soon.
Super-friends Tom Connolly and Joe Russo birthed a new project during quarantine! Come witness the debut performance of Psychic Newborns! Psych-pop wishes and waking dreams. Kaleidoscopic candy for the spirit world.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Improvised music by GoBruCCio, Bob Gorry Thurs., Aug. 5

The free improvisation trio GoBruCcio play the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Thurs., Aug. 5. The show starts at 5 PM with a short solo acoustic set by guitarist Bob Gorry.

The trio of guitarist Bob Gorry, bassist Pete Brunelli, and drummer Peter Riccio create dynamic and consistently intriguing free improvisations as GoBruCcio. The three long-time musical friends perform spontaneous interplay that takes the music in unexpected directions while offering listeners plenty of variety and surprises. They draw from their wide variety of musical experiences to construct a consistently intriguing and colorful set of unpredictable yet satisfying music. Their music progresses through varied movements with one player often taking the lead, the others following and building on his ideas, and then shifting gears to take the group improvisation in a surprisingly different direction. Their debut album, GoBruCcio, will be released this fall. http://music.nhic-records.com/

Bob Gorry will open the evening with an acoustic set of eclectic music drawing from country blues, cello music, jazz, and twisted Americana.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

UPDATE—Rescheduled to Aug. 4: On the Trail plays bluegrass at Best Video

UPDATE July 2: Due to the rainy weather, this show is being rescheduled to Wed., Aug. 4, at 5:30 PM.

On the Trail plays Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Fri., July 2, starting at 5:30 PM.

Featuring four musicians from four very different backgrounds, On The Trail is a modern acoustic quartet that explores everything from bluegrass to contemporary pop, from stunning instrumentals to beautiful traditional songs. The band bonded from their love of bluegrass and the band Punch Brothers, and has already gained recognition and praise for their exploration and strong execution of the challenging music, as well as for their new original music. On The Trail features Austin Scelzo (fiddle and vocals), Tom Polizzi (mandolin and vocals), Charlie Widmer (guitar and vocals), and Chet Duke (banjo).

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. There will also be a donation vase set out for Best Video.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

New releases 7/20/21

Top Hits
Dream Horse (drama/comedy, Toni Collette. Rotten Tomatoes: 88%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 67. From Glenn Kenny’s New York Times review: “In the comedy-drama ‘Dream Horse,’ a woman who works two jobs gets an idea. Remembering her glory days of training animals — pigeons, to be exact — she is determined to buy a mare and birth a race horse. She doesn’t have the resources to do it on her own, so she turns to her sleepy community in Wales to pool their assets. This sports underdog story, which is based on true events, has several features endemic to the genre. But ‘Dream Horse,’ an unabashed crowd-pleaser directed by Euros Lyn, earns its smiles and cheers.” Read more…)

Undergods (sci-fi/horror, Johann Myers. Rotten Tomatoes: 80%. Metacritic: 71. From Elisabeth Vincentelli in The New York Times: “The film will be anathema to those who need clear-cut — well, clear-cut anything. But Moya has made something rare: an oddity that feels both familiar and completely sui generis. Fans of ‘Delicatessen,’ ‘Brazil’ and ‘Eraserhead’ should give it a shot.” Read more…)

Spiral: From the Book of Saw (horror, Chris Rock. Rotten Tomatoes: 37%. Metacritic: 40. From Lena Wilson’s New York Times review: “In ‘Spiral,’ the latest film in the ‘Saw’ universe, the first expletives land before the two-minute mark. Blood spills right after, when a man has to decide between getting his tongue ripped out or being hit by an underground train. That the film is overall gorier and more foulmouthed than its predecessors, while still managing an R rating, is undoubtedly an accomplishment. Unfortunately, that is the film’s only notable one.” Read more…)

Wrath of Man (action, Jason Statham. Rotten Tomatoes: 66%. Metacritic: 57. From Glenn Kenny’s New York Times review: “The filmmaker Guy Ritchie has long shown an eagerness to take a whack at almost any blockbuster format a given studio is willing to offer him. Witness the noisome ‘Sherlock Holmes’ period pictures he’s made with Robert Downey Jr., or his more recent live-action consideration of Disney’s ‘Aladdin.’ But his most enjoyable movies remain the tough, nasty crime thrillers with which he kicked off his career back in 1999 with ‘Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels.’ His new ‘Wrath of Man’ is such an item, although it’s more somber and less rollicking than the likes of ‘Lock.’” Read more…)

When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (historical drama, Riva Krymalowski. Rotten Tomatoes: 74%. Metacritic: 47. From Jeannette Catsoulis’ New York Times review: “Painting a curiously cozy portrait of refugee life, Caroline Link’s ‘When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit’ views displacement and the approaching Holocaust primarily through the experiences of a child, Anna Kemper [a captivating Riva Krymalowski]. The result is a movie that’s almost as cuddly as the toy in its title.” Read more…)

New Blu-Ray
Wrath of Man

New Foreign DVDs
There Is No Evil (Iran, drama, Ehsan Mirhosseini. Rotten Tomatoes: 98%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 83. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Ben Kenigsberg’s Times review: “Because ‘There Is No Evil’ has landed in international headlines — the director, Mohammad Rasoulof, made the movie covertly and without the approval of Iranian authorities, and a ban on his leaving the country prevented him from accepting the top prize at the Berlin International Film Festival in person last year — revealing what it’s about seems fair. But the film is constructed to surprise you.” Read more…)

Slalom (France, #MeToo drama, Jérémie Renier. Rotten Tomatoes: 100%, Certified Fresh. Metacritic: 77. From Teo Bugbee’s New York Times review: “In competitive skiing, athletes balance the rewards of downhill glory against the dangers of a fall. The sensitive, discomforting drama ‘Slalom’ follows Lyz [Noée Abita], a 15-year-old recruit to a ski facility in the French Alps. There, young skiers are molded into champions by an ambitious trainer, Fred [Jérémie Renier]. From their first meeting, the relationship between Lyz and Fred is physical.” Read more…)

Sublet (Israel, drama/comedy/LGBTQ romance, John Benjamin Hickey. Rotten Tomatoes: 90%. Metacritic: 67. From Beatrice Loayza’s New York Times review: “The film doesn’t exactly subvert its clichéd ‘when two worlds meet’ premise, and its bubbly but lame music cues are no help. The Israeli director Eytan Fox offers insights into two generations of gay men that at times can seem superficial. Nevertheless, he creates a pleasurably low-key double character study.” Read more…)

Yourself & Yours (South Korea, 2016, romance, You-young Lee. Rotten Tomatoes: 94%. Metacritic: 75. A New York Times Critic’s Pick. From Glenn Kenny’s Times review: “[Director Hong Sang-soo’s] formal confidence yields a movie that’s very simply constructed and utterly engrossing. There are a lot of scenes done in a single shot, usually static, but when there’s a zoom [his preferred camera flourish] it’s unfussy and direct. He puts you in tune with the world of his sad-sack characters immediately, and their rhythm becomes the rhythm of the story.” Read more…)

New British (Commonwealth) DVDs
A Town Like Alice (Australia, 1980, drama mini-series, Helen Morse)
Brokenwood Mysteries: Series 2 (New Zealand, mystery/procedural, Neill Rea)

New Classic DVDs (pre-1960)
The Web (1947, film noir, Edmond O’Brien. From T.M.P.’s 1947 New York Times review: “There’s a big surprise in store for anyone who visits Loew’s Criterion, where ‘The Web’ opened yesterday, and it doesn’t have anything to do with the quality of the film, which is just another whodunit. The story follows a routine course, with a struggling young lawyer taking up with a rich industrialist—not as a legal adviser, but as a bodyguard—and finding himself enmeshed in a fatal shooting which has all the trappings of a first-class frame-up.” Read more…)

Larceny (1948, film noir, John Payne. From T.M.P.’s 1948 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “The old confidence game is being worked to a fare-thee-well in ‘Larceny,’ which opened yesterday at the Winter Garden. Surprisingly enough this melodrama packs considerable punch as it races along from one larcenous episode to another. Since the plot is not only old and familiar but markedly illogical as well this spectator is at a loss to justify the feeling of satisfaction engendered by this obviously contrived exercise in smouldering violence.” Read more…)

New American Back Catalog DVDs (post-1960)
Deep Cover (1992, mystery/procedural, Criterion Collection, Laurence Fishburne. Rotten Tomatoes: 83%. From Janet Maslin’s 1992 New York Times review [requires log-in]: “‘I want my cake and eat it too,’ says one of the characters in ‘Deep Cover,’ the story of a policeman assigned to masquerade as a cocaine dealer. The film itself seemingly embraces that same thought. On the one hand an upright police thriller, ‘Deep Cover’ is also a rapt exploration of all the vice and viciousness that make the drug kingpin’s life so popular with contemporary film makers. The film’s cautionary message, which is stated outright, is undercut by its fascination with seamy glamour.” Read more…)

Working Girls (1986, Lizzie Borden-dir. drama, Louise Smith. Rotten Tomatoes: 91%. From J. Hoberman’s “rewind” column for the New York Times: “‘Working Girls’ is notable for its measured structure, analytical camera placement and straightforward cool. Borden only tips her hand once, when she allows Molly — who has been sweet-talked into working a double shift — to ask Lucy if she’s ever heard of ‘surplus value.’ ‘Working Girls’ is an anticapitalist critique that has scarcely dated, save for one bit of hip social realism I neglected to note when I reviewed it in 1987 for a downtown weekly. Asked how she heard about the job, a new recruit reveals that she answered a want ad for ‘hostesses’ in The Village Voice.” Read more…)

New Documentaries
Tulsa: The Fire and the Forgotten (U.S. history, racism, civil rights. From Mike Hale’s New York Times television review: “The PBS film is journalistic, built around the reporting of The Washington Post’s DeNeen L. Brown, who appears onscreen, and narrated by NPR’s Michel Martin. It spends a little less time on the past and more on the continuing issues of race in Tulsa, including educational disparities and the protests following the police killing of Terence Crutcher, an unarmed Black man, in 2016. In the nature of the contemporary newspaper feature, it’s a touch sanctimonious.” Read more…)

UPDATE—Rescheduled to Aug. 1: Isabella Mendes and Flavio Lira play bossa nova out doors

UPDATE July 3: Due to the rainy weather, this show has been rescheduled to Sun., Aug. 1, at 5:30 PM.

Isabella Mendes and Flavio Lira play bossa nova and other Brazilian music styles on the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck Sat., July 3, at 5:30 PM.

Isabella Mendes is known for her sensitive interpretations of jazz, bossa novas, as well as the pop-tinged music and her own originals.

Isabella Mendes was born in Brazil, where she began her music studies at the age of 4. Four years later, she was composing and well advanced in mastering the piano, which earned her a scholarship to the world renowned conservatory of music Fundação Magda Tagliaferro, where she went on to earn several prizes in piano competitions and Master Classes.

In 1999, a career opportunity brought her family to the United States, where she continued her musical studies with noted instructors Rachael Elliott and Qi Liu, both then at Yale University. In her senior year of high school, Isabella received the Louis Armstrong Jazz Award and was recognized for her musical achievements with a “2002 Hamden Salutes Young Artists” by the town of Hamden and the State of Connecticut. She further her studies at New Haven’s Educational Center for the Arts (ECA) and has performed at Yale University and Woolsley Hall.

Isabella Mendes’ multicultural musical interpretations and compositions can be enjoyed at her performances throughout Connecticut.

Hailing from Brazil, Flavio Lira is very active and eclectic. Musical styles have never been a restriction for him, and since the beginning, he has performed with groups ranging from Popular Samba to Classical Chamber Music.

“Regardless of style, if there are great musicians on stage, I’m happy to be there!”

​Flavio Lira has kept developing the passion for his own musical roots, as well as working with different musical traditions of the world, such as Jazz, Caribbean music and others.

Living close to New York, Flavio Lira is able to fully employ his versatility as a musician, collaborating with different artists and performing in prestigious venues, such as Birdland and Jazz at Lincoln Center.

As part of his most recent project, Flavio Lira released the album Coffee Gold Sugar Cane, a rhythmic fusion of Brazilian grooves, Cuban clave, Colombian folkloric and jazzy chords.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are required inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. There will also be a donation vase set out for Best Video.

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.

Wally, Sam Bass play the Best Video deck Sat., July 31

Rock band Wally plays the Best Video Film & Cultural Center deck on Sat., July 31. Sam Bass opens with a set at 5:30 PM.

Wally is a dream-pop/indie rock band from New Haven, CT. Blending many elements of shoegaze to pop, brothers Lucas and (Best Video staffer) Teo Hernandez along with lifelong friend Alex Blair share a tight relationship that reflect in their recordings and live shows. The trio’s combination of effortless harmonies, ethereal arrangement, and timeless songwriting is reminiscent of The Beach Boys, Cocteau Twins, and My Bloody Valentine.

Sam Bass is a finger-style guitarist and singer/songwriter. His pieces are largely influenced by singers like Elliott Smith and Jason Molina, with an added element of math rock, i.e. bands like Toe, Covet, and Don Caballero.

We ask respect for social distancing, please, and conscientiousness on masks. Not everybody is vaccinated yet and our venue wants to advise caution and consideration for others. Masks are optional outside but required if you go inside Best Video.

No cover charge but please bring cash for the musicians’ tip jar. This has been a real hard time for musicians, almost all of whom have seen their live performance income dry up. (There will also be a Best Video tip jar for donations.)

Parking available behind Best Video and on Thornton Street.